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CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000038
Continuing Education

Animation Shows Promise in Initiating Timely Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Results of a Pilot Study

ATTIN, MINA PhD, RN; WINSLOW, KATHERYN MSN, RN, CCRN; SMITH, TYLER PhD

Continued Education
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Abstract

Delayed responses during cardiac arrest are common. Timely interventions during cardiac arrest have a direct impact on patient survival. Integration of technology in nursing education is crucial to enhance teaching effectiveness. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of animation on nursing students’ response time to cardiac arrest, including initiation of timely chest compression. Nursing students were randomized into experimental and control groups prior to practicing in a high-fidelity simulation laboratory. The experimental group was educated, by discussion and animation, about the importance of starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognizing an unresponsive patient. Afterward, a discussion session allowed students in the experimental group to gain more in-depth knowledge about the most recent changes in the cardiac resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association. A linear mixed model was run to investigate differences in time of response between the experimental and control groups while controlling for differences in those with additional degrees, prior code experience, and basic life support certification. The experimental group had a faster response time compared with the control group and initiated timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognition of deteriorating conditions (P < .0001). The results demonstrated the efficacy of combined teaching modalities for timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Providing opportunities for repetitious practice when a patient’s condition is deteriorating is crucial for teaching safe practice.

Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

 

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