Home Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Topical Collections CE For Authors Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > January 2014 - Volume 32 - Issue 1 > Online Support for Employed Informal Caregivers: Psychosocia...
CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000009
Feature Article

Online Support for Employed Informal Caregivers: Psychosocial Outcomes

KLEMM, PAULA R. PhD, RN; HAYES, EVELYN R. PhD, MPH, FNP-BC; DIEFENBECK, CYNTHIA A. PsyD, APRN, BC; MILCAREK, BARRY PhD

Collapse Box

Abstract

The overall objectives of this project were to evaluate whether psychosocial outcomes in employed family caregivers of people with chronic disease, who participate in online support, differ from nonactive participants and whether psychosocial outcomes differ based on the format of online group support. A randomized longitudinal design comparing two types of online support groups and nonactive participants, on the basis of three principal measures, was utilized. Eighty-six self-reported family caregivers of people with chronic disease, who spoke English and had Internet access, took part in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to professionally facilitated/psychoeducational or moderated/peer-directed online support groups for a period of 12 weeks. The setting was a password-protected Web page housed on a university server. Independent variables were type of online support groups and level of participation; the dependent variables were depressive symptoms, caregiver burden, and caregiver quality of life. There were significant differences in depressive symptoms and quality of life among nonactive participants and either of the two intervention groups, but not between the two intervention groups. Results suggest that professionally facilitated/psychoeducational and moderated/peer-directed online support groups help reduce depressive symptoms and improve quality of life for those who actively participate and that both types of online support groups provided similar benefits. Men and minorities should be targeted in future caregiver research.

Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

 

Login

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Featured Collections