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Critical Care Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181b42d03
Clinical Investigations

The use of a critical care consult team to identify risk for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and the potential for early intervention: A pilot study*

Keene, Adam MD, MS; Lemos-Filho, Luciano MD, MS; Levi, Michael ScD; Gomez-Marquez, Jose MD; Yunen, Jose MD; Said, Hayder; Lowy, Franklin D. MD

Erratum

Erratum

The use of a critical care consult team to identify risk for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and the potential for early intervention: A pilot study: Erratum

For the article on page 109 of the January 2010 issue, the affiliations were listed incorrectly. They should have been listed as below:

From the Division Critical Care Medicine, Departments of Medicine (AK, LL-F, JY, HS) and Pathology (ML), Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; and the Department of Medicine (FDL), Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

Critical Care Medicine. 39(2):427, February 2011.

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Abstract

Objective: To test whether a critical care consult team can be used to identify patients who have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization during a window period at which they are at highest risk for methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection and can most benefit from topical decolonization strategies.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: Two adult tertiary care hospitals.

Patients: Patients with at least one risk factor for methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization who were seen by a critical care consult team for potential intensive care unit admission were enrolled.

Interventions: Nasal cultures for methicillin-resistant S. aureus were performed on all subjects. All subjects were followed for the development of a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection for 60 days or until hospital discharge. Demographic and outcome data were recorded on all subjects.

Measurements and Main Results: Two hundred subjects were enrolled. Overall 29 of 200 (14.5%) were found to have methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections occurred in seven of 29 (24.1%) subjects with methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization vs. one of 171 (0.6%) subjects without methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization (p < .001). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus clinical specimens were recovered in 15 of 29 (51.7%) subjects with methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization vs. two of 171 (1.2%) without methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization.

Conclusions: A critical care consult team can be used to rapidly recognize patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization who are at very elevated risk for methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection. The use of such a team to recognize patients who have greatest potential benefit from decolonization techniques might reduce the burden of severe methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections.

© 2010 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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