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MicroRNAs in Vascular Disease

Qin, Shanshan MD; Zhang, Chunxiang MD, PhD

Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology:
doi: 10.1097/FJC.0b013e318203759b
Invited Review Article
Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression via degradation, translational inhibition, or translational activation of their target messenger RNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA is important as a transcription factor because it is able to regulate the expression of its multiple target genes. As a group, miRNAs are able to directly regulate at least 30% of genes in a cell. In addition, other genes may also be regulated indirectly by miRNAs. It is therefore not surprising that miRNAs could be the pivotal regulators in normal development, physiology, and pathology. Recent studies have identified that miRNAs are highly expressed in vasculature and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. miRNAs are found to be critical modulators for vascular cell functions such as cell differentiation, contraction, migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. Accordingly, miRNAs are involved in the vascular dysfunction, ischemic angiogenesis, reendothelialization, and vascular neointimal lesion formation under diverse vascular diseases. miRNAs may serve as novel therapeutic targets for vascular diseases such as impaired angiogenesis or reendothelialization, restenosis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetic vascular complication. This review article summarizes the research progress regarding the roles of miRNAs in vascular diseases.

See Editorial, MicroRNA: Redefining Mechanisms in Cardiovascular Diseases by Maha Abdellatif, Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 2010;56:441-443.

Author Information

From the RNA and Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Department of Anesthesiology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ.

Received for publication September 13, 2010; accepted October 25, 2010.

Supported by National Institutes of Health Grant HL080133, HL095707, and a grant from American Heart Association 09GRNT2250567.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Reprints: Chunxiang Zhang MD, PhD, RNA and Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Department of Anesthesiology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB-E548, Newark, NJ 07101 (e-mail: zhangc3@umdnj.edu).

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.