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Quality of Life of African American Breast Cancer Survivors: How Much Do We Know?

Russell, Kathleen M. DNS, RN; Von Ah, Diane M. PhD, RN; Giesler, R. Brian PhD; Storniolo, Anna M. MD; Haase, Joan E. PhD, RN

doi: 10.1097/01.NCC.0000339254.68324.d7
Articles

Women affected by breast cancer experience an array of quality-of-life issues that affect their daily living in both short-term and long-term survivorship. Because African American women experience disparities in breast cancer survival, their quality-of-life concerns may paint a different picture from those of other racial and ethnic groups. To gain a better understanding of quality of life in African American women breast cancer survivors, we conducted a review, using an adaptation of Brenner's quality-of-life proximal-distal continuum, of studies that have investigated these women's experiences and associated variables. Twenty-six studies, qualitative and quantitative, were reviewed that identified both deficits and positive outcomes of breast cancer treatment and sequelae, including physical, emotional, social, and patient-provider problems as well as heightened spirituality and positive growth. Although overall global quality of life was favorable in both African American and white survivors, differences existed in the nature and extent of deficits between these 2 survivor groups. Nursing implications of this review point to the need for further rigorous research and wide dissemination of results. Recommendations for practice include tailoring assessments and interventions within the context of the lives of African American women breast cancer survivors.

Women affected by breast cancer experience an array of quality-of-life issues that affect their daily living in both short-term and long-term survivorship. Because African American women experience disparities in breast cancer survival, their quality-of-life concerns may paint a different picture from those of other racial and ethnic groups. To gain a better understanding of quality of life in African American women breast cancer survivors, we conducted a review, using an adaptation of Brenner's quality-of-life proximal-distal continuum, of studies that have investigated these women's experiences and associated variables. Twenty-six studies, qualitative and quantitative, were reviewed that identified both deficits and positive outcomes of breast cancer treatment and sequelae, including physical, emotional, social, and patient-provider problems as well as heightened spirituality and positive growth. Although overall global quality of life was favorable in both African American and white survivors, differences existed in the nature and extent of deficits between these 2 survivor groups. Nursing implications of this review point to the need for further rigorous research and wide dissemination of results. Recommendations for practice include tailoring assessments and interventions within the context of the lives of African American women breast cancer survivors.

Authors' Affiliations: Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis (Drs Russell, Von Ah, and Haase); Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana (Dr Giesler); and Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (Dr Storniolo).

Corresponding author: Kathleen M. Russell, DNS, RN, Indiana University School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Dr, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (katrusse@iupui.edu).

Accepted for publication June 13, 2008.

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.