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Proceedings of the American Burn Association 49th Annual Meeting

Journal of Burn Care & Research: March/April 2017 - Volume 38 - Issue - p S1–S49
doi: 10.1097/BCR.0000000000000510
49th Annual Meeting of the American Burn Association

Tuesday through Friday

March 21–24, 2017

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Boston, MA

Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the Editor(s), publisher, the American Burn Association (ABA), or Burn Science Publishers (BSP), and the Editor(s), publisher, the ABA and BSP disclaim any responsibility or liability for such material. Neither the Editor(s), publisher, the ABA or BSP guarantees, warrants, or endorses any product or service advertised in this publication, nor do they guarantee any claim made by the manufacturer of such product or service.

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Board of Trustees

President    Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS

Phoenix, Arizona

President-Elect    Linwood R. Haith, MD, FACS, FCCM

Upland, Pennsylvania

First Vice-President    Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS

Dallas, Texas

Second Vice-President    Ernest J. Grant, RN, BSN, MSN, PhD, FAAN

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Secretary    William G. Cioffi, Jr., MD, FACS

Providence, Rhode Island

Treasurer    William L. Hickerson, MD, FACS

Memphis, Tennessee

Program Chair    Lucy Wibbenmeyer, MD, FACS

Iowa City, Iowa

Membership Officers    Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP

Seattle, Washington

Jason Woods, FF

Washington, District of Columbia

Kathe M. Conlon, BSN, RN, CEM, MSHS

West Orange, New Jersey

Vincent A. Gabriel, MD, MSc, FRCPC

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Past Presidents    Edward E. Tredget, MD, MSc, FRCS(C)

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

David H. Ahrenholz, MD, FACS

Maple Plain, Minnesota

Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS

New York, New York

Member, Board of Governors    Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS

American College of Surgeons    Seattle, Washington

Member, Trauma, Burns, and Critical Care Board    David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS

American Board of Surgery    Sacramento, California

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Past Presidents

1969    Curtis P. Artz, MD*

1970    Boyd W. Haynes Jr., MD, FACS*

1971    John A. Moncrief, MD*

1972    Robert M. McCormack, MD, FACS*

1973    Charles R. Baxter, MD, FACS*

1974    Bruce G. Macmillan, MD*

1975    John A. Boswick Jr., MD, FACS*

1976    Basil A. Pruitt Jr., MD, FACS

1977    William W. Monafo Jr., MD, FACS*

1978    Alan R. Dimick, MD, FACS

1979    Duane L. Larson, MD, FACS*

1980    Arthur D. Mason Jr., MD*

1981    Charles E. Hartford, MD, FACS

1982    John F. Burke, MD, FACS*

1983    Francis C. Nance, MD, FACS

1984    P.William Curreri, MD, FACS

1985    J. Wesley Alexander, MD, ScD, FACS

1986    Martin C. Robson,MD, FACS

1987    Joseph A. Moylan, MD, FACS*

1988    David M. Heimbach, MD, FACS

1989    C. GillonWard,MD, FACS

1990    Thomas L. Wachtel, MD, FACS

1991    Fred T. Caldwell Jr., MD, FACS*

1992    Roger E. Salisbury, MD, FACS

1993    Glenn D. Warden,MD, FACS

1994    David N. Herndon, MD, FACS

1995    Robert H. Demling, MD, FACS

1996    Andrew M. Munster, MD, FRCS, FACS*

1997    William F. McManus, MD, FACS*

1998    Edwin A. Deitch, MD, FACS

1999    Cleon W.Goodwin, MD, FACS

2000    John L. Hunt, MD, FACS

2001    Ronald G. Tompkins, MD, ScD, FACS

2002    Jeffrey R. Saffle, MD, FACS

2003    Marion H. Jordan, MD, FACS

2004    Lynn D. Solem, MD, FACS

2005    Richard L. Gamelli, MD, FACS

2006    Gary F. Purdue, MD, FACS*

2007    David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS

2008    Richard J. Kagan, MD, FACS

2009    G. Patrick Kealey, MD, FACS

2010    Robert L. Sheridan, MD, FACS

2011    Sidney F. Miller, MD, FACS*

2012    Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS

2013    Tina L. Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM

2014    Palmer Q.Bessey, MD, FACS, MS

2015    David H. Ahrenholz, MD, FACS

2016    Edward E. Tredget, MD, MSc, FRCS(C)

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Past Membership Officers Board of Trustees

1974–1975    Janet A. Marvin, RN, MN

1975–1977    Elizabeth Sheehy, RN, MEd

1977–1979    Patricia T. Mieszala, RN

1979–1981    Cornelia Kenner, RN, CCRN, MS*

1980–1982    Peter A. Brigham, MSW*

1981–1983    Madeleine T.Martin, RN, EdD

1982–1984    Carole L. Johnson, PhD

1983–1985    Elizabeth A. Bayley, RN, PhD

1984–1986    Ellen L. Heck,MA, CEBT

1985–1987    Marion E. Doctor, LCSW

1986–1988    Beth Helvig, RN, MS, CETN

1987–1990    J. Jeffrey Heinrich, PA, EdD

1988–1991    Cheryl J. Leman, OTR/L*

1989–1992    Ellen Cram, RN, MN, CCRN

1990–1993    Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN

1991–1994    Judith A. Carr, OTR/L

1992–1995    Cora K. Ogle, PhD

1993–1996    Leslie E. Robson, RN, MS

1994–1997    R. Scott Ward, PhD, RPT

1995–1998    Cathy F.Blache, RN, MSN, CCRC

1996–1999    Reginald L. Richard, MS, PT

1997–2000    Jane Shelby, PhD

1998–2002    Rosie Thompson, RN, MS

1999–2003    Mary D. Gordon, RN, MS

2000–2004    Michele Gottschlich, PhD, RD

2001–2005    David R. Patterson, PhD

2002–2006    Lynne C. Yurko, RN, BSN

2003–2007    Patricia W. Gillespie, RN, MS

2004–2008    Barry K. Bennett, LCSW

2005–2009    Ronald J. Siarnicki, Fire Chief

2006–2010    Mary Jo Baryza, PT, MS, PCS

2007–2011    Kathy G. Supple, MSN, ACNP, CCRN

2008–2012    Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

2009–2013    Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

2010–2014    Kathleen A. Hollowed, RN, MSN

2011–2015    Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS

2012–2016    Michael A. Serghiou, OTR, MBA

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Past 2nd Vice Presidents Board of Trustees

1988–1989    Thomas J. Krizek, MD, FACS

1989–1990    Phala A. Helm, MD

1990–1991    Carlos Blanco, MD

1991–1992    Paul Silverstein, MD, FACS

1992–1993    Bruce E. Zawacki, MD

1993–1994    Robert W. Gillespie, MD, FACS*

1994–1995    George M. Watkins, MD, FACS*

1995–1996    Stanley Levenson, MD

1996–1997    Sally Abston, MD, FACS

1997–1998    John P. Remensnyder, MD, FACS*

1998–1999    Albert T. McManus, PhD*

1999–2000    Richard B. Fratianne, MD, FACS

2000–2002    Daniel L. Traber, PhD*

2002–2004    John P.Heggers, PhD

2004–2006    Roger W. Yurt, MD, FACS

2006–2008    WilliamG. CioffiJr.,MD, FACS

2008–2010    Mary-Liz C. Bilodeau, RN, MS, CCRN

2010–2012    Steven T.Boyce, PhD

2012–2014    PeterC. Esselman, MD, MPT

*Deceased

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General Information

The ABA Annual Meeting, held each spring, offers an array of educational programs. The ABA is a multidisciplinary association and the program content is designed to provide all members with activities within their scope of practice, knowledge level, and interest. The program book provides a navigation tool and helpful hints to give the meeting attendee a more meaningful experience.

The ABA program book, printed proceedings of the annual meeting, will be distributed at registration. An APP will also be available to electronically access meeting information, sessions, exhibitors, abstracts and Boston highlights. Check the ABA website’s annual meeting page, www.ameriburn.org, for pdf copies of the abstracts.

Included in this book are the elected and appointed ABA officers, committee members, program summary, correlative sessions, oral and poster sessions, moderators, speakers, and more.

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2017 Annual Meeting Highlights

* New Member Welcome Breakfast & International Attendee Welcome Breakfast

* Local Burn Center Tours: Registration is required.

* Opening Ceremony, Presidential Address (“Burns-A Team Approach”), Awards

* Presidential Update & Plenary: Dr. Peck will review the “State of the ABA”

* Rising from the Ashes-Cocoanut Grove Nightclub Fire

* Fundamentals of Burn Care: Designed to provide basic information for the novice burn care provider.

* Burn Center Leadership Boot Camp: Multi-disciplined session with focus on leadership and team building in the burn unit.

* Sunrise and Luncheon Symposia: Variety of topics presented within small groups. Moderators guide discussion and active participation is expected. A light meal will be provided-these sessions are very popular. Registration is required. If there are “no shows,” space may be available at the door.

* Postgraduate Courses: Three topics are offered, (4) hour courses in two days, designed to provide knowledge for the experienced burn care professionals.

* Correlative Sessions: Short presentations of abstracts, held on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Sessions are presented simultaneously, and “room hopping” is expected.

* Plenary Sessions: Plenaries are a vehicle used to impart information on topics of broad importance, applicability and interest. All attendees are welcome.

* Poster Sessions and “Best in Category:” All are welcome to stop by the exhibit hall to view posters and attend the “Best in Category” poster presentations.

* Friday Educational Opportunities: Ethics Case Presentation, Lasers in Burn Care, Pro/Con Debate, and more.

The program book is a useful guide to assist you throughout the meeting. All details are listed in the book and posted on the ABA APP. Attendees must register for most sessions and pre-registration is required. Poster viewing is open to all attendees and stop by to visit the meeting exhibitors and sponsors, all in Hynes Convention Hall D.

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CME Accreditation and Credit

The American Burn Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Burn Association takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

The American Burn Association designates this live activity for a maximum of 29.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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AACN Credit

This program will offer accreditation for nurses. Information will be available at a later date.

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CDR Credit

The American Burn Association has applied for approved credit for up to a maximum of 29.5 CPE Category II and III contact hours through the Commission on Dietetic Registration, depending on attendance at the various educational sessions offered.

Further information and CEU statements are available at the Registration Desk.

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Speaker Ready Room

The Speaker Ready Room is located in the Exeter Room, 3rd floor. Please remember to check into the Speaker Ready Room as soon as possible and at least the day before your presentation.

Your presentation will be entered on to a “common”disc by the technician. Please make sure your presentation is in its fnal form as once “burned” onto the common disc, no changes can be made.

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Please do not bring your computer into your session.

The Speaker Ready Room will be open during the following hours and staffed with a technician to assist with any questions.

Monday    March 20   12:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Tuesday    March 21    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday    March 22    7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday    March 23    7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday    March 24    7:00 am - 2:00 pm

Publication of your manuscript in the Journal of Burn Care & Research, the offcial publication of the American Burn Association, is expected. Manuscripts should be prepared according to the format specified by the Journal, and must be submitted online through the Journal’s website at https://www.editorialmanager.com/jbcr/. All manuscripts submitted from the meeting will receive priority review and early publication in the Journal.

Registration Information for future meetings can be obtained from the ABA’s Central Office:

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American Burn Association

311 S. Wacker Dr., Suite 4150

Chicago, IL 60606

(312) 642–9260

(312) 642–9130 FAX

www.ameriburn.org info@ameriburn.org

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Future ABA Meetings

April 10–13, 2018    Chicago, Illinois

April 2–5, 2019    Las Vegas, Nevada

TBD, 2020    TBD

April 6–9, 2021    Chicago, IL

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2017 ABA Committees

The ABA Committees support the mission of the ABA. Volunteer and be active – complete the online volunteer form.

(Committee Members are listed in the ABA APP and ABA Website, http://www.ameriburn.org)

ABLS Advisory Committee    Monday, March 20, 3:30 pm-5:30 pm, Dalton

Tam N. Pham, MD, FACS, Chair

Aftercare Reintegration Committee    Monday, March 20, 12 pm -2:30 pm, Back Bay A Ballroom

Radha K. Holavanahalli, PhD, Co-Chair

Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS, Co-Chair

Archives Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm, Dalton

Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., MD, FACS, Chair

Awards Committee    No Meeting Scheduled

Michael D. Peck, ScD, FACS, Chair

Burn Prevention Committee    Monday, March 20, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Independence Ballroom

Jennifer Radics-Johnson, MBA, Chair

Burn Registry Committee    Monday, March 20, 8:00 am-9:30 pm, Berkeley

Mary Lou Patton, MD, FACS, Chair

Burn Science Advisory Panel    Monday, March 20, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Gardner B

James H. Holmes, IV, MD, FACS, Chair

David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS, Vice Chair

Bylaws Committee    Monday, March 20, 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm, Gardner A

William G. Cioffi, Jr., MD, FACS, Chair

Conflict of Interest Committee    Monday, March 20, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm, Dalton

Marion H. Jordan, MD, FACS, Chair

Education Committee    Monday, March 20, 10:00 am – 11:00 am, Hampton

Victor C. Joe. MD, FACS, Chair

Anjay K. Khandelwal, MD, Vice Chair

Ethical Issues Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Commonwealth

Sharmila D. Dissanaike, MD, FACS, Chair

Exhibitor Advisory Committee    No Meeting Scheduled

William L. Hickerson, MD, FACS, Chair

Government Affairs Committee    Monday, March 20, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm, Commonwealth

Kevin N. Foster, MD, MBA, FACS, Chair

Institutional Advisory Council    Monday, March 20, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm, Commonwealth

Dana M. Kyles, RN, MS, Chair

International Outreach Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 9:30 am – 11:30 am, Boston Common

Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN, Chair

Sarvesh Logsetty, MD, Vice Chair

Membership Advisory Committee    Monday, March 20, 8:00 am – 3:30 pm, Republic Ballroom

Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP, Chair

NBR Advisory Committee    Monday, March 20, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, Dalton

Michael J. Mosier, MD, FACS, FCCM, Chair

Nominating Committee    No Meeting Scheduled

Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS, Chair

Organization & Delivery of Burn Care Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 8:00 am – 11:00 am, Public Garden

Colleen M. Ryan, MD, FACS, Chair

Program Committee    No Meeting Scheduled

Lucy Wibbenmeyer, MD, FACS, Chair

Kathleen A. Hollowed, RN, MSN, Associate Chair

Rehabilitation Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Public Garden

Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT, Chair Jeffrey C. Schneider, MD, Vice Chair

Research Committee    Tuesday, March 21, 8:00 am – 11:00 am, The Ferns

Jeffrey W. Shupp, MD, FACS, Chair

Verification Committee    Monday, March 20, 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Gardner A/B

Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS, Chair

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2017 Special Interest Groups (SIGS)

Special Interest Group Meetings provide an opportunity for the exchange of ideas, networking with colleagues, and information sharing. All ABA meeting participants are encouraged to attend these meetings.

(SIGS are listed alphabetically. SIG descriptions are located on the ABA website, http://www.ameriburn.org, and ABA APP.)

1. Anesthesiology/Respiratory: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 9:00 am-12:00 pm, Jamaica Pond

2. APRN/PA: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 10:00 am-12:00 pm, Gardner B

3. Bioengineering/Biophysics: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 11:00 am-1:00 pm, Arnold Arboretum

4. Burn Camp: Monday, 3/20/17, 3:00 pm-6:00 pm, Riverway

5. Burn Center Physicians: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 11:00 am-1:00 pm, Clarendon

6. Burn Prevention: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, Independence Ballroom

7. Burn Registry Users: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 9:00 am-11:00 am, Gardner A

8. Burn Survivor & Reintegration: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 8:00 am-10:00 am, Republic A Ballroom

9. Canadian: Monday, 3/20/17, 7:00 pm-10:30 pm, Back Bay A Ballroom

10. Disaster: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 10:00am-12:00 pm, Republic B Ballroom

11. Epidemiology: Monday, 3/20/17, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm, Independence Ballroom

12. Federation of Burn Foundation: Monday, 3/20/17, 5:00 pm-8:00 pm, Public Garden

13. Fire Fighters: Monday, 3/20/17, 12:00 pm-5:00 pm, Back Bay B Ballroom

14. Fluid Resuscitation: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 7:00 am-9:00 am, Back Bay B Ballroom

15. Nursing: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 11:00 am-1:00 pm, Back Bay A Ballroom

16. Nutrition: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 8:00 am-10:00 am, Riverway

17. OT/PT: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, Back Bay C Ballroom

18. Pediatric Burns: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 11:00 am-1:00 pm, Back Bay B Ballroom

19. Pharmacy: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 10:00 am-1:00 pm, Berkeley

20. Reconstructive: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 9:00 am-12:00 pm, Hampton

21. Research: Tuesday, 3/21/17, 11:00 am-1:00 pm, Riverway

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Forty-Ninth Annual Meeting Program Summary

Monday, March 20

6:30 am – 5:00 pmRegistration

Ballroom Foyer

7:30 am -5:00 pmABLS Provider Course

Fairfax A

8:00 am – 9:30 amBurn Registry Committee

Berkeley

8:00 am – 1:00 pmGES Setup

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

8:00 am – 3:30 pmMembership Advisory Committee Meeting

Republic A Ballroom

9:00 am – 12:00 pmBurn Science Advisory Panel

GardnerB

9:00 am – 3:00 pmBurn Prevention Committee

Independence East Ballroom

9:30 am – 10:30 amAd Hoc Coding Committee

Gardner A

10:00 am – 11:00 amEducation Committee

Hampton

10:00 am – 11:30 amNBR Advisory Committee

Dalton

11:30 am – 1:00 pmMAC/SIG Chair Luncheon

Republic B Ballroom

12:00 pm – 1:30 pmIAC/Government Affairs Luncheon

Commonwealth

12:00 pm – 2:30 pmAftercare Reintegration Committee

Back Bay A Ballroom

12:00 pm – 4:00 pmSpeaker Ready Room

Exeter

12:00 pm – 5:00 pmFire Fighters SIG

Back Bay B Ballroom

1:00pm – 5:00 pmRehabilitation Committee Workshop

Back Bay D Ballroom

1:00pm – 5:00 pmExhibitor Set Up

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

1:30 pm – 2:30 pmBylaws Committee

Gardner A

2:30 pm – 3:30 pmConflict of Interest Committee

Dalton

3:00 pm – 5:00 pmBurn Epidemiology SIG

Independence East Ballroom

3:00 pm – 6:00 pmBurn Camp SIG

Riverway

3:30 pm – 5:30 pmABLS Advisory Committee

Dalton

4:00 pm – 7:00 pmVerification Committee (closed)

Gardner A & B

5:00 pm – 8:00 pmFederation of Burn Foundations SIG

Public Garden

5:30 pm – 6:30 pmAd Hoc Technology Committee

Dalton

7:00 pm – 10:00 pmBMS Meeting

Berkeley

7:00 pm – 10:30 pmCanadian SIG

Back Bay A Ballroom

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Tuesday, March 21

7:00 am – 7:00 pmRegistration

Ballroom Foyer

7:30 am -1:00 pmABLS Instructor Course Lecture

Fairfax A

7:00 am – 9:00 amFluid Resuscitation SIG

Back Bay B Ballroom

8:00 am – 10:00 amNutrition SIG

Riverway

8:00 am – 10:00 amBurn Survivor and Reintegration SIG

Republic A Ballroom

8:00 am – 11:00 amOrganization and Delivery of Burn Care Committee

Public Garden

8:00 am – 11:00 amResearch Committee

The Fens

8:00 am – 1:00 pmOccupational Therapy/Physical Therapy SIG

Back Bay C Ballroom

8:00 am – 1:00 pmBurn Prevention SIG

Independence E Ballroom

8:00 am – 5:00 pmSpeaker Ready Room

Exeter

8:30 am – 3:00 pmBoard of Trustees Meeting

Commonwealth

9:00 am – 11:00 pmBurn Registry SIG

Gardner A

9:00 am – 12:00 pmAnesthesiology/Respiratory SIG

Jamaica Pond

9:00 am – 12:00 pmReconstructive SIG

Hampton

9:30 am – 11:30 amInternational Outreach Committee

Boston Common

10:00 am – 12:00 pmAdvanced Practice Registered Nurse/Physician Assistant SIG

Gardner B

10:00 am – 1:00 pmPharmacy SIG

Berkeley

10:00 am – 12:00 pmDisaster SIG

Republic B Ballroom

11:00 am – 1:00 pmBioengineering/Biophysics SIG

Arnold Arboretum

11:00 am – 1:00 pmBurn Center Physicians SIG

Clarendon

11:00 am – 1:00 pmNursing SIG

Back Bay A Ballroom

11:00 am – 1:00 pmPediatric Burns SIG

Back Bay B Ballroom

11:00 am – 1:00 pmResearchSIG

Riverway

11:30 am – 1:00 pmBoardof Trustees/Committee Chair Luncheon

Constitution A Ballroom

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Tuesday, March 21 (continued)

12:00 pm – 2:00 pmPoster Set-Up (#127–212)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

12:00 pm – 4:00 pmABLS Provider Course Breakouts

1:00 pm – 2:00 pmNortheast Region Burn Conference

Dalton

1:00 pm – 5:00 pmFundamentals of Burn Care: The Outpatient Burn Clinic

Republic A/B Ballroom

1:00 pm – 5:00 pmBurn Center Leadership Boot Camp

Back Bay A & B Ballroom

2:00 pm – 3:30 pmABLS Coordinator Course

Fairfax A & B

2:00 pm – 3:00 pmRehabilitation Committee

Public Garden

2:00 pm – 3:00 pmWestern Region Burn Conference

Boston Common

2:30 pm – 3:30 pmEastern Great Lakes Regional Meeting

Gardner A

2:30 pm – 3:30 pmSouthern Regional Meeting

Gardner B

3:00 pm – 4:00 pmArchives Committee

Dalton

3:00 pm – 4:00 pmISIS Grant Meeting (closed)

Clarendon

3:00 pm – 4:00 pmEnergize Grant Meeting (closed)

Berkeley

3:00 pm – 7:00 pmExhibits Open/Poster Viewing (#127–212)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

3:00 pm – 7:00 pmSOAR Coordinator Course

The Fens

3:30 pm – 5:00 pmBurn Prevention Workshop

Independence Ballroom

3:30 pm – 5:30 pmRehabilitation Workshop

Back Bay C Ballroom

4:15 pm – 5:45 pmABuRN Town Meeting

Constitution A Ballroom

5:00 pm – 7:00 pmOpening Reception

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

5:00 pm – 7:00 pmEthical Issues Committee

Commonwealth

7:00 pm – 10:00 pmStralatech Meeting

Gardner A

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Wednesday, March 22

6:15 am – 7:00 amZumba

Fairfax B

6:30 am – 6:30 pmRegistration

Ballroom Foyer

6:30 am – 7:45 amSunrise Symposia 1–13

7:00 am – 7:45 amNew Member Welcome Breakfast

Republic Ballroom

7:00 am – 5:00 pmSpeaker Ready Room

Exeter

8:00 am – 9:30 amOpening Ceremony/Presidential Address & Awards

Grand Ballroom

9:30 am – 10:00 amCoffee with Exhibitors

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

9:30 am – 1:45 pmExhibits Open/Poster Viewing (#127–212)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr I: Critical Care I

Back Bay A Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr II: Nursing

Constitution Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr III: Public Health, Epidemiology & Prevention

Back Bay C Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr IV: Quality Improvement

Independence Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr V: Wounds-Translational

Republic Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmFire Fighter I

Hynes Convention Center Hall B

12:00 pm – 1:45 pmLunch with Exhibitors

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

12:30 pm – 1:45 pmPoster Rounds with Professors & Authors #127-#212

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

12:15 pm – 2:00 pmTransfusion Trigger DSMB (closed)

Hampton

2:00 pm – 3:00 pmPoster Dismantle (#127–212)

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course A

Back Bay A Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course B

Back Bay C Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course C

Independence Ballroom

3:00 pm – 5:00 pmPoster Setup (#213–301)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

4:00 pm – 6:00 pmCalifornia Burn Foundation

Dalton

4:00 pm – 7:00 pmExhibits Open/Poster Viewing (#213–301)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

4:15 pm – 5:30 pmRising from the Ashes: The Cocoanut Grove Symposium

Constitution Ballroom

5:00 pm – 6:30 pmWine & Cheese Reception – Posters with Authors

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

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Thursday, March 23

6:15 am – 7:00 amYoga

Fairfax B

7:00 am – 5:00 pmRegistration

BallroomFoyer

6:30 am – 7:45 amSunrise Symposia 14–26

7:00 am – 7:45 amInternational Attendee Breakfast

Republic Ballroom

7:00 am – 5:00 pmSpeaker Ready Room

Exeter

8:00 am – 8:25 amPresidential Update

Grand Ballroom

8:25 am – 9:30 amPresidential Plenary: Spirituality

Grand Ballroom

9:30 am – 10:00 amCoffee with Exhibitors

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

9:30 am – 1:45 pmExhibits Open/Poster Viewing (#213–301)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr VI: Critical Care II

Back Bay A Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr VII: Nutrition, Metabolism

Back Bay C Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr VIII: Outpatient, Pain, Quality Improvement II

Constitution Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr IX: Reconstruction

Independence Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr X: Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention II

Republic Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmFire Fighter II

Commonwealth

12:00 pm – 1:30 pmJBCR Editorial Meeting (closed)

Fairfax A & B

12:00 pm – 1:45 pmLunch with Exhibitors

Hynes ConventionCenter HallD

12:30 pm – 1:45 pmPoster Rounds with Professors & Authors (#213–301)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

2:00 pm – 3:00 pmPoster Dismantle (#213–301)

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course A

Back Bay A Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course B

Back Bay C Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPostgraduate Course C

Independence East Ballroom

4:15 pm – 5:30 pmLocal Burn Tours (bring your ticket)

Sheraton Boston Hotel Lobby

4:15 pm – 5:30 pmThe Year in Review: The Top Journal Publications

Republic Ballroom A/B

4:15 pm – 5:30 pmChanging Places

Commonwealth

5:00 pm – 6:30 pmSOAR Coordinator Update Meeting

Fairfax A/B

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Friday, March 24

7:00 am – 4:30 pmRegistration

BallroomFoyer

6:30 am – 7:45 amRepeat of Three Most Popular Sunrise Symposia

Hampton|Berkeley|GardnerA

7:00 am – 2:00 pmSpeaker Ready Room

Exeter

8:00 am – 9:30 amFriday Plenary: Top 6 Abstracts

Grand Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmBest in Category Posters (18 Categories)

Hynes Convention Center Hall D

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr XI: Critical Care III

Back Bay A Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr XII: Psychosocial

Back Bay C Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr XIII: Rehabilitation

Constitution Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr XIV: Wounds – Clinical

Independence Ballroom

10:00 am – 12:00 pmCorr XV: Critical Care Translational

Republic Ballroom

12:15 pm – 1:45 pmLuncheon Symposia 27–35

12:15 pm – 1:45 pmEthics: Social Media

Liberty A Ballroom

12:15 pm – 1:45 pmRoad Map – Burn Research

Back Bay B Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmUtilizing Legislation

Back Bay A Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmCertification – Burn Nurses & Therapists

Constitution A Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmPro Con Debate

Liberty A Ballroom

2:00 pm – 4:00 pmLasers

Republic Ballroom

4:15 pm – 5:15 pmBusiness Meeting (open to all)

Independence East Ballroom

7:45 pm – 12:30 amAnnual Banquet

Grand Ballroom

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Saturday, March 25

8:00 am – 11:30 amBoard of Trustees Meeting (closed)

Public Garden

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Special Workshops and Forums

ABLS Provider Course    Monday, March 20, 7:30 am - 5:00 pm, Fairfax A

The Provider Course provides guidelines in the assessment and management of the burn patient during the first 24 hours.

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ABLS Instructor/Coordinator Course    Tuesday, March 21, 7:30 am - 3:30 pm, Fairfax A/B

The Instructor Course is designed to introduce participants to general concepts of teaching and learning and to prepare participants as instructors of the Provider Course.

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Phoenix SOAR Coordinator Training    Tuesday, March 21, 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm, The Fens

The Phoenix Society’s Survivors Offering Assistance in Recovery (SOAR) was designed by a national advisory team of health care professionals and burn survivors to provide a structured volunteer peer support program. The program also enables the medical centers to create a pool of motivated and trained peer supporters with a minimum expenditure of staff resources.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to: Describe the framework for successful program implementation; Identify requirements of the SOAR program; Utilize the resources and materials of the SOAR program; Understand the basic elements of giving feedback and managing conflict; Understand the role of the national organization. This training is intended for existing Phoenix Society SOAR Hospitals to train additional coordinators, and for new hospitals that have completed the start up requirements. For further information on the start up requirements please contact the Phoenix Society at pam@phoenix-society.org.

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ABA Burn Research Network (ABuRN) Town Hall Meeting    Tuesday, March 21, 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm, Constitution A Ballroom

At this multidisciplinary meeting, ABA leadership and clinical researchers will review the updated infrastructure of ABuRN, the progress of current studies, and discuss the status of future projects.

4:00 pm - 4:30 pmUpdate & Review of ABuRN Infrastructure

4:30 pm - 5:00 pmStatus of Current Trials & RFPs

5:00 pm - 5:30 pmOpen-Floor Discussion

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New Member Welcome Breakfast    Wednesday, March 22, 7:00 am - 7:45 am, Republic Ballroom

Are you a new ABA member attending the Annual Meeting for the first time? Please join your colleagues and ABA leadership for breakfast at this informal networking session. Learn more about the educational opportunities, programs, activities, Committees and Special Interest Groups (SIGs) of the ABA.

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International Attendee Welcome Breakfast    Thursday, March 23, 7:00 am - 7:45 am, Republic Ballroom

All International attendees at the ABA Annual Meeting are invited to this informal breakfast session where the attendees can get to know ABA leadership and learn more about ABA educational opportunities and initiatives.

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Local Burn Center Tours    Thursday, March 23, 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm

Available tours will include the burn units at Brigham & Women’s Hospital Burn Center Adult Burn Center, Shriners Hospitals for Children - Boston Pediatric Burn Center and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. An overview of the direct care and research for the facilities will be given. Register early - Limited Availability (40 per burn center).

Meeting Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel Lobby at 4:00 pm (Bring your tour ticket).

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Fitness Classes: Zumba and Yoga Offered    Wednesday, March 22 and Thursday, March 23, 6:15 am - 7:00 am, Fairfax B

Pre-registration is required.

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Fundamentals of Burn Care – “The Outpatient Burn Clinic”

Tuesday, March 211:00 pm - 5:00 pm Republic Ballroom

Course Directors: Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS, Barbara R. Birmingham, CRNP and Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

According to most recent estimates, approximately 486,000 burn injuries occur yearly that require medical treatment. Of these, the overwhelming majority (80%) are treated in the outpatient setting. Overall survival approaches 97%, including many with very large TBSA involvement. Over time, we have recognized that burn survivors have ongoing needs that must be addressed long after discharge. Increasing pressures on resource utilization have created an environment emphasizing earlier transitions to outpatient care while maintaining high quality outcomes. All of these factors have increased greatly the importance and role of the outpatient burn clinic in recovery from burn injury.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Identify the factors that impact triage decisions in burn care (inpatient vs. outpatient)

* Identify the various products and techniques in the wound care armamentarium to maximize efficacy and efficiency of outpatient burn wound management

* Recognize the alternatives and adjuncts available for the treatment of acute and chronic burn-related pain

* Describe both the short and long-term physical and psychosocial needs of burn patients and how to address them

1:00 pm - 1:10 pmIntroduction

Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS

1:10 pm - 1:40 pmCommunity Hospital to Burn Center

Tam N. Pham, MD, FACS

1:40 pm - 2:10 pmOutpatient Wound Care

Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

2:10 pm - 2:40 pmPain Management

Jennifer L. Brandt, PharmD

2:40 pm - 3:00 pmQuestions and Answers

3:00 pm - 3:10 pmBreak

3:10 pm - 3:40 pmPsychosocial Acute Issues

James A. Fauerbach, PhD

3:40 pm - 4:10 pmPsychosocial Long Term

Colleen M. Ryan, MD, FACS

4:10 pm - 4:40 pmAncillary Services (PT/OT/SW/CM/WC/Chaplain/Child Life)

Barbara Birmingham, CRNP

Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

Anjay Khandelwal, MD, FACS

Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS

Sandra Fletchall, MPA, OT, CHT

4:40 pm - 5:00 pmQuestions and Answers

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Burn Center Leadership Boot Camp

Tuesday, March 211:00 pm - 5:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

Course Directors: David T. Harrington, MD, FACS and Stephanie L. Farquhar, RN, CCRN

Running a burn center is not just taking care of patients but being an administrator, a manager and a leader. Many practitioners are put in leadership positions in burn centers without any training in team building and leadership. Leadership skills, in all disciplines and on all levels, can increase productivity and effectiveness.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Identify available resources for leaders and managers

* Identify team building opportunities

* Discuss the importance of communication skills among all team members

* Describe the impact leaders can have on the quality of care

* Discuss the importance of competencies for burn team members

1:00 pm - 1:05 pmIntroduction

David T. Harrington, MD, FACS

1:05 pm - 1:35 pmLeadership and Management Resources

Kathleen A. Hollowed, RN, MSN

1:35 pm - 2:05 pmYou Want to be a Pediatric Burn Center?

David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS

2:05 pm - 2:35 pmWhat is Multidisciplinary Care and How Do You Actually Get it Done?

Marc G. Jeschke, MD, PhD, FACS

2:35 pm - 3:05 pmCommunication

Vina Rajski, MSN, RN, CCRN

3:05 pm - 3:20 pmBreak

3:20 pm - 3:50 pmQI/QA

Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS

3:50 pm - 4:20 pmCompetencies

Elizabeth A. Mann-Salinas, RN, PhD

4:20 pm - 4:50 pmBeyond the Criterion Deficiencies - All Politics are Local. What Does YOUR Burn Center Need?

David T. Harrington, MD, FACS

4:50 pm - 5:00 pmQuestions and Answers

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Sunrise Symposia - Wednesday

Wednesday, March 22 6:30 am - 7:45 am

1. Adjuncts to Resuscitation? Use of Vitamin C and Colloids in the Early Management of a Large Burn Injury?

Room: Hampton

Moderators: Christopher W. Lentz, MD, FACS, FCCM and Arthur P. Sanford, MD, FACS

2. Certification for Burn Physicians

Room: Berkeley

Moderators: David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS and Sharmila D. Dissanaike, MD, FACS

3. Do Acuity Metrics Work to Define Nursing FTE Requirements?

Room: Commonwealth

Moderators: Cynthia L. Reigart, RN, MSN and Jeanie M. Leggett, RN, BSN, MA

4. Explosive Trends in Consumer Products: Lithium Batteries and E-Cigarettes

Room: Riverway

Moderators: Karla Ahrns-Klas, RN, BSN, CCRP and Gretta E. Wilkinson, RN

5. Family Involvement: Too Much, Not Enough

Room: The Fens

Moderators: Anjay Khandelwal, MD, FACS and Meesha Last, PA-C

6. How Wide Is the Net? Do You Care for More Than Just Burns

Room: Jamaica Pond

Moderators: Katherine A. Lee, RN, MSN and John T. Schulz III, MD, FACS, PhD

7. Implementing Austere Guidelines in a Disaster

Room: Boston Common

Moderators: Annette F. Matherly, RN and Tina L. Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM

8. Pre-Operative Teaching - Nuances and Techniques

Room: Clarendon

Moderators: Jill Krystofinski, CRNA, MSN and Elizabeth Dey, CPNP-AC

9. Scar Contracture: What’s a Therapist To Do?

Room: Gardner A

Moderators: Lynne Benavides, OTR/L, CHT and Derek E. Murray, PT

10. Self Harm by Burning

Room: Gardner B

Moderators: Sharmila D. Dissanaike, MD, FACS and James A. Fauerbach Jr., PhD

11. Sustainability for International Outreach in Resource-Limited Countries

Room: Public Garden

Moderators: Sarvesh Logsetty, MD, FACS, and Ron Lett, MD, MSc, FCS (ECSA), FRCSC

12. The Nuts and Bolts of Verification

Room: Dalton

Moderators: Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS, Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN and Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

13. Therapeutic Community Reintegration Programs: A Collaboration Between Clinicians and Fire Fighters

Room: Fairfax A

Moderators: Lori Turgeon, PT, DPT, Christen Bradbury, CTRS, CCLS and Stephen Turley, FF

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Opening Ceremony, Awards Presentation and Presidential Address

Wednesday, March 228:00 am - 9:30 amGrand Ballroom

Burns - A Team Approach

Presented by:

Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS

Associate Medical Director, Arizona Burn Center

Phoenix, Arizona

Burn teams have an interdisciplinary nature acquired through many decades of practical experience working in the environment of burn centers. However, there is rarely a systematic, methodical approach taken to building and maintaining burn teams. When burn teams function well, they are among the best teams in the medical center. When they function poorly however, resolution of problems may be slow or incomplete because of inadequate understanding of some of the important principles that underlie team functions.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Identify the parameters by which team functioning can be measured

* Understand and describe the barriers to optimal team functioning

* Utilize one or more techniques for improving team functioning

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Correlative I: Critical Care I

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Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

Moderators: Robert C. Cartotto, MD, FRCS(C) and Amy Van Cleave, RN, CCRN

1. High Dose Ascorbic Acid for Burn Shock Resuscitation Does Not Improve Outcomes

2. Renal Replacement Therapy in Severe Burns: An Observational Study

3. Retrospective Validation of the American Burn Association Sepsis Consensus Guidelines Using a Large Multicenter Dataset

4. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Supplementation Reversed CoQ10 Insufficiency and Ameliorated Increased Circulating Mitochondrial DNA Level in Burn Patients

5. Transfusion Triggers in Burn Patients Fail To Reduce Hemoglobin Variation Over Time

6. Clinical Impact of PCR-Based Detection of S. Aureus in Burn Sepsis Patients

7. Long Term Effects of Pediatric Burn Injury on Cardiac Function

8. Introducing Phases of Illness Paradigm Tools Reduces Some Cognitive Work During Multidisciplinary Rounds

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Correlative II: Nursing

Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Constitution Ballroom

Moderators: Jeanie M. Leggett, RN, BSN, MA and Ernest J. Grant, PhD, MSN, RN, FAAN

9. Using Novel Low Cost, High-Fidelity Simulation Techniques for Burn Wound and Graft Care Education for Non-Burn Center Nurses

10. The BUGG Initiative (Burn Unit Gloves and Gown)

11. Identification of the Vulnerable Burned Child in the Burn Unit: Burn PEWS Score of Five

12. Clinical Application of Airway Management Bundles in Patients with Severe Inhalation Injury: Clinical Nursing Experience in a Northeast Burn Center in China

13. A Novel Approach to Capture Burn Nursing Work

14. The Longitudinal Prevalence of Unfinished Nursing Care

15. Reducing Triage Calls in an Outpatient Burn Clinic: A Nurse Driven Initiative

16. Burn Nurses: Perception of Psychiatric Aspects in Burn Care

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Correlative III: Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention

Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Back Bay C Ballroom

Moderators: Kathe M. Conlon, BSN, RN, CEM, MSHS and Alisa Savetamal, MD, FACS

17. An Examination of Follow-up Services Received by Vulnerable Burn Populations: A Burn Model System National Database Study

18. Overuse of Air Ambulance Services at a Regional Burn Center

19. Burn Injury and the Diabetic Patient: Significant Increases in Risk of Hospital-Acquired Infection and Mortality

20. Burn Injuries in Patients with Paralysis - A National Perspective on Injury Patterns and Outcomes

21. Factors Associated With Unplanned Readmissions Five Years After Major Burn Injury: A Population-Based Analysis

22. The Impact of Legislation on Gas Can and Mattress Related Burn Injuries

23. Epidemiology of Burns From Over a Decade of Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq

24. Persistent Gender-Based Disparities in Burn Mortality: A Single Institution Study from 2004 -2013

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Correlative IV: Quality Improvement

Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Independence Ballroom

Moderators: Cynthia L. Reigart, RN, MSN and Adam J. Singer, MD

25. Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess an E-Learning on Acute Burn Care

26. Transitions of Care: Identifying the Barriers

27. Development of an Interdisciplinary Burn Performance Improvement Program

27a. Assessing the Compatibility of Burn Databases: Making the Case for Common Data Elements

28. Assessing the Compatibility of Burn Databases: Making the Case for Common Data Elements

29. Analysis of OR Efficiency in a Burn Centre

30. Impact of Multiday Dressing on Length of Stay in Pediatric Palmar Contact Burns

31. An Initiative to Improve Interdisciplinary Patient Care Rounding

32. A Multimodality & Multidisciplinary Approach to Reduction of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs) in the Burn Unit

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Correlative V: Wounds - Translational

Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Republic Ballroom

Moderators: Edward E. Tredget, MD, MSc, FRCS(C) and Dorothy M. Supp, PhD

33. Topically Applied Stem Cell Conditioned Media Accelerates Burn-Related Wound Healing

34. Occlusion of Blood Vessels with Erythrocyte Aggregates in Periburn Tissue is the Likely Root Cause of Burn Injury Progression and is Mitigated by Arteriole Vasodilation Induced with a Bioactive Peptide

35. Novel Technology Measures Tissue Moisture to Distinguish Partial from Full Thickness Burns

36. Pre-Vascularized hMSC Sheets Improve Therapeutic Effects of Split Thickness Skin Grafting in a Rat Wound Model

37. A Translational Approach to Targeting Scleraxis for Prevention of Trauma-Induced Heterotopic Ossification

38. In Situ Delivery of Fibrin-Based Hydrogels Prevents Contraction and Reduces Inflammation

39. Pigmentation of Engineered Skin Substitutes Protects Against Ultraviolet Light-Induced DNA Damage

40. Resolvin D2 and DNase Minimize Secondary Wound Necrosis

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Fire Fighter Courses

Fire Fighter Course I: IAFF Fire Ground Survival Trailer - Comprehensive Survival Skills - Imminent Danger to Personal Safety

Wednesday, March 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Hynes Convention Center Hall B

Moderator: Gerry Adam, FF

IAFF Fire Ground Survival Trailer (FGS)-Comprehensive Survival Skills-Imminent Danger to Personal Safety. This is an interactive “hands on” session with audience participation. All are welcome and attendees will be able to practice newly learned techniques. Limited amount of PPE will be Provided.

10:00 am - 12:00 pm Speaker

Lionel Crowther, FF and Fire Ground Survival Instructors from the IAFF

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Postgraduate Courses

Post Graduate Course A: Complications in Burn Care. Do We Learn From Our Experiences?

Course Directors: Anthony Papp, MD, PhD and Patricia A. Kardos MSN, CCRN

Course Description: Education, in general, teaches us how to do things in the correct way and how to lessen the risks for complications. However, things do not always go as planned. Not enough attention is paid to complications; why they occur, how we deal with them and what the follow-up is. Managing complications is typically more challenging than managing treatment courses that are not complicated. There are lessons to be learned from complications and these give us an opportunity for both quality of care assessments and improvement.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Discuss how to review complications

* Describe the principles of peer review, loop closure, M&M rounds and quality assessment

* Describe the tools for quality improvement

Wednesday, March 22 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmCourse Overview

Anthony Papp, MD, PhD

2:10 pm - 2:30 pmWhat Does Quality Improvement Look Like?

Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS

2:30 pm - 2:45 pmMea Maxima Culpa: How Do We Deal With Our Complications?

Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP

2:45 pm - 3:00 pmA Case Failure to Heal Wounds

David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS

3:00 pm - 3:15 pmResuscitation Failure

Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS

3:15 pm - 3:40 pmSkin Graft Loss and Donor Site Issues--Everyone Can Do Better

James H. Holmes IV, MD, FACS

3:40 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion

Thursday, March 232:00 pm - 4:00 pmBack Bay A Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmOverview for the Day

Anthony Papp, MD, PhD

2:10 pm - 2:30 pmHow Do We Measure Our Performance?

Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS

2:30 pm - 2:50 pmMaximizing Morbidity and Morality Rounds for Multidisciplinary Education and Systematic Change

David T. Harrington, MD, FACS

2:50 pm - 3:10 pmOvercoming Silos

Clare L. Herlihy, MD

3:10 pm - 3:25 pmWhat is Discoverable and How Do We Protect Ourselves?

Bonnie Y. Sawusch, RN, BSN, JD

3:25 pm - 3:40 pmIntegrating QI/PI Into the Existing Hospital Structure

Patricia A. Kardos MSN, CCRN

3:40 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion

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Postgraduate Courses

Postgraduate Course B: Tools and Resources for Improving Social Reintegration: How We Do It

Course Directors: Radha K. Holavanahalli, PhD and Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS

Course Description: Burn care professionals do not regularly address issues such as improving body image, developing social skills and providing peer support with patients. This activity is designed to assist burn care team members to better understand the available resources and tools and how they can implement these tools to assist with the re-integration process. Provision of resources to help survivors integrate with their self, family, and community across the continuum of care and beyond should be a systematic and standard practice.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Identify available resources

* Implement the tools available across the continuum of care to assist patients and families in their psychosocial recovery and reintegration

Wednesday, March 22 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Back Bay C Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmIntroduction

Radha K. Holavanahalli, PhD

2:10 pm - 2:25 pmBurn Survivor Perspective

John O’Leary

2:25 pm - 2:40 pmLong-Term Community Reintegration Outcomes--What Do We Know?

Colleen M. Ryan, MD, FACS

2:40 pm - 3:00 pmSurvivor’s Anticipation of Body Image and Grieving the Loss

Muji Karim and Diana Tenney

2:50 pm - 3:00 pmVideo Presentation: Body Image Through the Eyes of Parents and Children

3:00 pm - 3:15 pmBody Image, Sexuality, and Intimacy

Cindy Rutter, RN, BSN and Anita M. Fields, RN, BSN

3:15 pm - 3:50 pmBody Image Crucial Conversations: How We Do it

Cindy Rutter, RN, BSN, Anita M. Fields, RN, BSN, Ruth B. Rimmer, PhD and Elizabeth Dideon-Hess, MSW

3:50 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion - Questions and Answers

Thursday, March 232:00 pm - 4:00 pmBack Bay C Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmThe Role of Peer Support in Recovery

Karen L. Badger, PhD, MSW

2:10 pm - 2:20 pmPeer Support in Burn Centers

Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS

2:20 pm - 2:55 pmPeer Support: Making it Happen

Jennifer Harris, MSW, LICSW, Lisa Marie Donovan, MSW, LICSW and Jude MacVicar, RN, BC

2:55 pm - 3:05 pmSocial Skills Training: Tools for Thriving After Burn Injury

Radha K. Holavanahalli, PhD

3:05 pm - 3:50 pmSocial Skills to Promote Social Control, Social Comfort, and Social Competence: How We Do it

Barbara Kammerer-Quayle, MA, Nicole C. Perry, BA, CCLS, Mona Krueger, MSW, MA and Rebekah R. Allely, OTR/L

3:50 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion - Questions and Answers

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Postgraduate Courses

Postgraduate Course C: The Management of Pain Throughout the Continuum of Care

Course Director: Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS

Course Description: Achieving adequate control of pain is a well known problem of paramount importance to burn patients and providers alike. In response to general concerns regarding underassessment and inadequate management of pain, the American Pain Society introduced the idea of “pain” as the 5th vital sign in 1996. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization (JCAHO) followed in 2001 with a statement on the standards for pain assessment and management. Fifteen to twenty years later, adequate pain control continues to be a formidable challenge, occurring within an environment where opioid abuse and addiction have become a public health concern. This course will explore the physiologic basis for pain and a broad range of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches for pain management in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Describe the physiologic mechanisms of pain

* Recognize the basic pharmacology of common opioid and non-opioid medications used in pain control and apply them to the development of effective pain control regimens in the inpatient and outpatient settings

* Identify non-pharmacologic adjuncts for pain control and when to use them

* Explain the challenges of pain control in various populations - pediatrics, chronic pain, substance abuse

Wednesday, March 22 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Independence Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmIntroduction - Background, Basics, and the Beginning of the Journey

Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS

2:10 pm - 2:35 pmUnderstanding Physiology of Pain (Nociceptive and Neuropathic)

Jennifer L. Brandt, PharmD

2:35 pm - 3:00 pmUnderstanding Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Opioid and Non-Opioid Medications and How This Affects Dosing and Administration

Solomon Liao, MD, FAAHPM

3:00 pm - 3:25 pmInpatient Care: Moderate and Deep Sedation--Who Does it and How?

Joe R. Jansen, MD

3:25 pm - 3:50 pmAnalgesic Issues in Transition from Inpatient to Outpatient Care (Opioid Weaning and Use of Non-Opioid Analgesics)

Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

3:50 pm - 4:00 pmCase Discussion with the Speakers

Thursday, March 23 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Independence Ballroom

2:00 pm - 2:10 pmIntroduction - Settings and Situations

Sam R. Sharar, MD

2:10 pm - 2:35 pmAnalgesic Inpatient Care: Non-Pharmacologic Adjuncts--Virtual Reality, Distraction, Hypnosis/Cognitive Therapy, and Music Therapy

Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP

2:35 pm - 3:00 pmChallenging Patients - Children, Elderly, and Persons with Substance Use Disorders

Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN

3:00 pm - 3:25 pmChronic Pain - Assessment, Consequences, and Management

Ariana Nelson, MD

3:25 pm - 4:00 pmCase Discussion with Speakers and Burn Survivors

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Rising from the Ashes: Cocoanut Grove Nightclub Fire

Wednesday, March 22 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm Constitution Ballroom

Course Directors: Kathe M. Conlon, BSN, RN, CEM, MSHS and Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS

The historical impact of this event has led to an increased knowledge and the development of various safety measures that, if implemented, could easily avoid repeating the same mistakes again. Although 2017 marks the 75th year anniversary of this fire, repeat violations are still occurring in present day nightclub fires.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Discuss the impact of this events to avoid future repetition that led to the deaths of 492 individuals

* Develop or modify existing burn safety programs incorporating lessons learned from the Cocoanut Grove Nightclub Fire

* Identify the importance of fire codes and the need to have these codes enforced and followed

* Implement appropriate medical practices for individuals injured as a result of similar large scale incidents

4:15 pm - 4:25 pmIntroduction and Cocoanut Grove Fire Overview

Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS

4:25 pm - 4:35 pmForensics, Tactics, Codes & Safety

Joseph Fleming, Deputy Chief

4:35 pm - 4:45 pmLegacies of the Fire

Kenneth A. Marshall, MD, FACS

4:45 pm - 5:05 pmMedical Advances in Burn Care

Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., MD, FACS

5:05 pm - 5:15 pmLegal Outcomes & Results

Professor James A. Fox

5:15 pm - 5:30 pmPanel Discussion

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Sunrise Symposia - Thursday

Thursday, March 23 6:30 am - 7:45 am

14. Achieving Optimal Outcomes with Deep Face and Neck Burns

Room: Hampton

Moderators: Beth J. Franzen, OT and Debra A. Reilly Culver, MD, FACS

15. Biologic Skin Substitutes - When to Use Term and How to Make Them Work

Room: Berkeley

Moderators: Tam N. Pham, MD, FACS and Rajiv Sood, MD, FACS

16. BQIP - What’s It All About?

Room: Commonwealth

Moderators: Palmer Q. Bessey, MD, FACS, MS and Joan M. Weber, RN, MSN, CIC

17. Communicating Your Research Results: From Presentation to Publication

Room: Riverway

Moderators: Linda E. Sousse, PhD and Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS

18. Controlling the ITCH - Prevalence, Assessment and Treatment

Room: The Fens

Moderators: Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN and Jeffrey C. Schneider, MD

19. Enhancement of Burn Rehabilitation Through Outdoor Recreation Programs

Room: Jamaica Pond

Moderators: Rebekah R. Allely, OTR/L, Charlie Shyab, FF and Lionel Crowther, FF

20. How to Incorporate Image Enhancement for Burn Survivors

Room: Boston Common

Moderators: Barbara K. Quayle, MA and Janelle Epp, CHT

21. How to Start up Burn Camp and Make It Work for All Your Burn Kids

Room: Clarendon

Moderators: Ron Fife, FF and David Petruccelli, FF

22. Meeting the Caloric Needs of the Pediatric Patient With a Large Burn Injury

Room: Gardner A

Moderators: Deborah Hutsler, RD, MS and Ludwik K. Branski, MS, MMS

23. Prevention: What Works & What Doesn’t

Room: Gardner B

Moderators: Curtis L. Ryun, RN and Susan Brown, BSN, RN, CCRN-K

24. Sleep Hygiene and Patient Satisfaction

Room: Public Garden

Moderators: Cameron Bell, RN and Michele M. Gottschlich, PhD, RD

25. Strengthening the Multidisciplinary Team Trough Case Based Discussions

Room: Dalton

Moderators: Clare Herlihy, MD and Karen L. Badger, PhD, MSW

26. Telemedicine: Pros and Cons of Providing This New Service and Lessons Learned

Room: Fairfax A

Moderators: Cathie Cannon, RN and Giavonni M. Lewis, MD, FACS

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Plenary

Presidential Update: State of the ABA

Thursday, March 23 8:00 am - 8:25 am Grand Ballroom

Course Director: Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS

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Presidential Plenary: Spirituality - An Important Tool for Burn Patients and Team Members

Thursday, March 23 8:25 am - 9:30 am Grand Ballroom

Course Directors: Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS, Robert L. Sheridan, MD, FACS, Wendy Cadge and Shirley M. Massey, Rev

Course Description: Although religion and spirituality play important roles in the lives of burn patients as well as health care providers, there is not only a gap of scientific research but also a lack of discussion in professional forums on this topic.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Describe the difference between religion and spirituality

* Understand the many ways in which both religion and spirituality influence the recovery of patients and their families from burn injuries

* Develop new ways of using spiritual principles to provide self-care for burn team members

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Correlative VI: Critical Care II

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

Moderators: Jeffrey W. Shupp, MD, FACS and Annemarie O’Connor, RN, MSN, APN, FNP

41. Hydroxyethyl Starch Use in Acutely Injured Burn Patients is Not Fluid Sparing and may Increase Rates of Renal Dysfunction

42. Clinical Course of Glucose Intolerance Secondary to Major Pediatric Burn Injury

43. Non-Operative vs. Operative Management of Burns in the Elderly: A Big Data Approach

44. Analysis of Concomitant Invasive and Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurements in Burned Children

45. Effect of Liposome Prostaglandin E1 on Pre-Thrombotic State of Patients with Severe Burns in Earlier Stage

46. Reduction in Narcotic Use and Pain Score After Indwelling Peripheral Nerve Catheter Placement in Burn Patients

47. Evaluation of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio and SpO2/FiO2 Ratio in Burned Children with Smoke Inhalation Injury

48. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score Is Better Than Modified Marshall Scoring (MMS) System at Predicting Mortality in Burn Patients

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Correlative VII: Nutrition, Metabolism

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Back Bay C Ballroom

Moderators: Beth A. Shields, RD, LD, CSNC and James H. Holmes IV, MD, FACS

49. International Burn Nutrition Survey

50. Weight Changes and Weight Measurements in Hospitalized Burn Patients

51. A Novel Perspective for Burn Induced Myopathy: Membrane Repair Defect

52. Acute Decline in Kidney Mitochondrial Respiration Post-Burn Injury

53. Burn Induced Insulin Resistance: Effect of Pre-Existing Obesity

54. Resistance Exercise Effects on Body Mass, Free Fatty Acid Concentration and Fatty Acid Metabolism in sqWAT Following Burn and Disuse in Rats

55. A Study on the Mechanism of Intestinal Trefoil Factor Promotes Glutamine Transport in Intestinal Epithelial Cells After Burn Injury

56. Oxandrolone and Propranolol Co-Administration Suppresses Mitochondrial Stress in Skeletal Muscle Following Severe Burn Trauma

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Correlative VIII: Outpatient, Pain, Quality Improvement II

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Constitution Ballroom

Moderators: Kathleen S. Romanowski, MD and Tammy L. Coffee, MSN, RN, ACNP

57. Building A Burn Bootcamp: Survey Analysis and Curriculum Development for Advanced Burn Providers

58. Impact of Returning to Work on Early Recovery for Adult Burn Survivors

59. Associations of Adult Burn Outcome Metrics with PROMIS-10: Do Condition Specific Measures Add important Information?

60. Hypoxemia and Blood Pressure Changes During Burn Dressing Changes Under Deep Monitored Anesthesia Care

61. A Pediatric Burn Outpatient Short Stay Program Decreases Patient Length of Stay with Equivalent Burn Outcomes

62. The Association Between Patient and Burn Characteristics and Itching Severity

63. Prospective, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial for the Evaluation of the Efficacy of 300 mg or 600 mg of Pregabalin versus Placebo in the Reduction of Pain and Opioid Consumption in Patients with Partial and Full Thickness Burn Injuries

64. Unplanned 30 Day Readmission Rates in Acutely Injured Pediatric Burn Patients

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Correlative IX: Reconstruction

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Independence Ballroom

Moderators: Derek Bell, MD, FACS and Anthony Papp, MD, PhD, FRCSC

65. Carbon Dioxide Laser Treatment in Burn-Related Scarring: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

66. Defining the Effects of FAK Signaling on Burn and Trauma Induced Heterotopic Ossification

67. A Prospective Study Evaluating Outcomes of Burn Scars Treated With Laser Therapy

68. Tips and Pitfalls of Burn Reconstruction Using Local Flaps - Difference Between Island and Skin Pedicle Flaps

69. A Combined Approach to Treating Hypertrophic Burn Scars: The Use of Pulsed Dye and Ablative Fractional CO2Lasers

70. Cultured Epidermal Autografts (CEA) for Coverage of Large Burn Wounds in Pediatric and Adult Patients, 1989–2015

71. Wound Bed Assessment After Enzymatic Eschar Removal: To Operate or Not to Operate?

72. Investigating the Feasibility and Reliability of Using the Dermalab Combo Skin Analysis Device in a Pediatric Setting

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Correlative X: Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention II

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Republic Ballroom

Moderators: Jason Woods, FF and David H. Ahrenholz, MD, FACS

73. Regional Disparities in the National Burn Repository

74. Prospective Review of Factors Associated with Burn Wound Cellulitis

75. Clinical Frailty Scoring is a Predictor of Outcome and Hospital Charges

76. There are No “Minor” Burns for the Elderly

77. A Pilot Survey of Southeastern Firefighters Regarding Safety Practices, Use of Protective Gear, and Associated Injury Patterns

78. Burn Injuries in the Elderly: An Opportunity for Technology-Based Active Prevention

79. Racial Disparities in Mortality and Complications After Burn Injury: Results of Analysis of the National Burn Repository

80. Cost of Burn Care Delivery in an American Burn Association Burn Center: A 10-Year Analysis

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Fire Fighter Courses

Fire Fighter Course II: Fire Fighter Response to Evolving Fuel Loads and Battery Fires

Thursday, March 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Commonwealth

Moderator: Ron Schreiber, FF

Course Description: Fire Fighter Response to Evolving Fuel Loads and Battery Fires. This class will discuss the modern fire environment and the introduction of current and upcoming battery technology. Electro-chemical battery technology is presenting challenges to the fire service and the unsuspecting public. All are welcome.

10:00 am - 11:00 amSpeaker

Sean DeCrane, Battalion Chief (Underwriters Laboratories)

11:00 am - 11:45 amSpeaker

Gavin Horn, MD (University of Illinois)

11:45 am - 12:00 pmQuestions and Answers

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Postgraduate Courses

Wednesday, March 22 and Thursday, March 23

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Post Graduate Course A:

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Complications in Burn Care. Do We Learn From Our Experiences?

Back Bay A Ballroom

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Post Graduate Course B:

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Tools and Resources for Improving Social Reintegration: How We Do It

Back Bay C Ballroom

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Postgraduate Course C:

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The Management of Pain Throughout the Continuum of Care

Independence Ballroom

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Changing Places

Thursday, March 23 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm Commonwealth

Hours after the Presidential Address at the 2014 ABA in Boston a nine-alarm fire erupted blocks away from the Sheraton in a four-story brick row house on Beacon Street in the Back Bay section of Boston. Two Boston Fire Fighters died fighting the blaze: Lt. Edward J. Walsh, 43, and Fire Fighter Michael Kennedy, 33. The fire also injured eighteen others, including thirteen Fire Fighters. Boston Fire Commissioner Joseph Finn, a 32-year veteran of the department will discuss the events of this tragic day with the participants of this year’s Changing Places.

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The Year in Review: Journal Publications

The Year in Review: The Top Burn Journal Publications in 2016

Thursday, March 23 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm Grand Ballroom

Moderator: Tina L. Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM

Course Description: A favorite session among attendees. Editors from each of the top publications in burn care present and discuss major advances in published burn research throughout the past year. Journals represented include: Journal of Burn Care & Research; Wound Repair and Regeneration; Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery; and Burns.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Discuss the latest research

* Acquire valuable citations for later review

4:15 pm - 4:20 pmIntroduction

Tina L. Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM

4:20 pm - 4:35 pmJournal of Burn Care & Research

David N. Herndon, MD, FACS

4:35 pm - 4:50 pmBurns

Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS

4:50 pm - 5:05 pmJournal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., MD, FACS

5:05 pm - 5:20 pmWound Repair and Regeneration

David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS

5:20 pm - 5:30 pmQuestions

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Three Most Popular Sunrise Symposia

Friday, March 24 6:30 am - 7:45 am

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Adjuncts to Resuscitation? Use of Vitamin C and Colloids in the Early Management of a Large Burn Injury?

Hampton

Moderators: Christopher W. Lentz, MD, FACS, FCCM and Arthur P. Sanford, MD, FACS

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Providing a Healthy Work Environment: Increasing Resiliency and Decreasing Moral Distress

Gardner A

Moderators: Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS and Roselle E. Crombie, MD, MPH

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Scar Contracture: What’s a Therapist To Do?

Berkeley

Moderator: Lynne Benavides, OTR/L, CHT

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Plenary

Plenary 1: Top 6 Abstracts (#81–86)

Friday, March 24 8:00 am - 9:30 am Grand Ballroom

Course Directors: Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS and Lucy Wibbenmeyer, MD, FACS

Course Description: The correlative sessions run concurrently which encourages attendees to select which abstracts are most important to them and, subsequently, causes other abstracts not be heard because of the timing of the presentation. The President and Program Chair will select the top six abstracts, as reviewed by the Program Committee, to be presented at the Friday Plenary to allow all attendees to hear the highest rated abstracts of the meeting.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to: Discuss the top six abstracts from the 49th Annual Meeting as designated by the Program Committee.

8:00 am - 8:15 am    Inhalation Severity of Injury Scoring System: A MultiCenter Trial Group Study

8:15 am - 8:30 am    The American Burn Association’s Randomized Controlled Evaluation of Hemofiltration in Adult Burn Patients with Septic Shock and Acute Renal Failure Trial

8:30 am - 8:45 am    Combined Oxandrolone and Propranolol with Exercise Improve Strength and Aerobic Fitness of Severely Burned Children

8:45 am - 9:00 am    Next Generation Sequencing of a Burn Unit Microbiome: A Pilot Study

9:00 am - 9:15 am    Nursing Understanding and Perceptions of Delirium: Assessing Current Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs in a Burn ICU

9:15 am - 9:30 am    Antioxidant and Trace Element Supplementation Reduce the Inflammatory Response in Critically Ill Burn Patients

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Correlative XI: Critical Care III

Friday, March 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

Moderators: William L. Hickerson, MD, FACS and William G. Cioffi Jr., MD, FACS

87. The Impact of a Nurse Driven Fluid Resuscitation Protocol

88. Tied Upon a Wheel of Fire: Distress and Delirium in Critically Ill Burn Patients

89. ABA Sepsis Criteria is Not Better than SIRS in Predicting Culture-Positive Infection in Critically Ill Burn Patients

90. Use of an Adjusted Ideal Body Weight Index Formula with FFP Rescue for the Resuscitation of Critically Ill Burn Patients

91. Evaluation of Procalcitonin for Sepsis Recognition in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Pilot Study

92. TNF/IL-10 Ratio Correlates with Prolonged Stay in the ICU

93. Incidence of Acute Kidney Injury in Computerized Decision Support System Guided Fluid Resuscitations

94. Reducing MDRO Rates in the Burn Unit: A Focus on the Environment

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Correlative XII: Psychosocial

Friday, March 2410:00 am - 12:00 pmBack Bay C Ballroom

Moderators: Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS and Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP

95. Rates and Predictors of Depression at 5 and 10 Years Post-Burn Injury

96. Participation in Burn Support Services and Quality of Life Among Burn Survivors

97. The Use of the PHQ4 as a Screening Tool for Anxiety and Depression in the Burn Patient

98. Satisfaction with Life Over Time in People with Burn Injury

99. Brief Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Acute Stress Disorder in a Regional Burn Center: A Randomized-Controlled Proof of Concept Study

100. Does Propranolol Improve the Psychosocial Outcomes of Exercise Training in Children with Severe Burns?

101. Building Bridges Using the Shriners Hospitals for Children/American Burn Association Burn Outcome Questionnaires to Follow Teenagers and Young Adults Across the Age Spans

102. Differential Effects of In-Home versus Hospital Sleep Studies Obtained from Actigraphy during the Rehabilitative Phase Post-burn

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Correlative XIII: Rehabilitation

Friday, March 241 0:00 am - 12:00 pm Constitution Ballroom

Moderators: Vincent A. Gabriel, MD, MsC, FRCPC and Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

103. Impact of Body Size on Exercise Thermoregulation with a Burn Injury: Is Bigger Better?

104. Contracture Severity at Hospital Discharge in Adults: A Burn Model System National Database Study

105. Modulation Effect of Pressure Therapy on Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and its Receptors in Hypertrophic Scar in vivo

106. Contracture Severity at Hospital Discharge in Children: A Burn Model System National Database Study

107. Burn Hand/Finger Goniometric Measurements: Sum of Isolated Parts ≠ Composite Whole

108. Effectiveness of Virtual Reality During Active Range of Motion with Burn Patients

109. Use of Bisphosphonates in Burn Patients to Decrease Ankylosis in Heterotopic Ossification

110. Improving Therapist Goniometry Reliability Using a Simulation Lab

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Correlative XIV: Wounds - Clinical

Friday, March 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Independence Ballroom

Moderators: Joan M. Weber, RN, MSN, CIC and Linwood R. Haith Jr., MD, FACS, FCCM

111. Compassionate Use of ReCell in Large Burns: A Single-Center U.S. Experience

112. How Does SCORTEN Score?

113. Challenging the 21 Day Golden Rule for Wound Closure: Lessons Learned from Rapid Enzymatic Eschar Removal in Deep Burns Assessed by LDI

114. Burn Injured Obese Experience Fewer Days to Heal

115. Reliability of a Panel of Subjective & Objective Measurement Tools for the Burn Scar

116. The Effect of Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Hydrogel on Pediatric Deep Partial Thickness Burns: A Multicenter Clinical Study

117. A Critical Review of the Clinical Experience on 44 Autologous Cell-Spray Grafting Procedures for Deep Partial Thickness Burns: An Analysis of Problems, Pitfalls, and Solutions

118. Comparison of Outcomes Between Allograft vs Xenograft Use in Burn Injuries

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Correlative XV: Critical Care - Translational

Friday, March 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Republic Ballroom

Moderators: Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS and Christopher W. Lentz, MD, FACS, FCCM

119. Assessing Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction After Burn Injury Using a Rat Scald Model

120. White Adipose Tissue Browning: The Heat is on the Liver

121. Vitamin E Supplementation in Adult Burned Patients: A Multi-Center, Randomized Clinical Trial

122. Burn Serum Stimulated Mitochondrial Fission Decreases with IL6 Antibody Treatment

123. Contribution of Xanthine Oxidase to Scald Burn Injury Induced Airway Epithelial Dysfunction

124. Mast Cell Committed Progenitors are Primed for Activation and Degranulation Temporal to Burn Injury

125. Effect of LPS on FDG Uptake in PAR-2 Knockout Mice

126. Dysregulation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Following Thermal Injury

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Best in Category Poster Presentations

Friday, March 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Hynes Convention Hall D

Moderators: Jeanie M. Leggett, RN, BSN, MA and Sandra J. Yovino, RN, BSN, MHA

Professors will award one poster for each category as “Best in Category”. These 18 “Best in Category” posters will be judged by the Program Committee Chair, the Research Committee Chair and the Membership Advisory Committee Chair.

If your poster is awarded “Best in Category”, you are expected to participate in this session where you will present a two minute overview of your poster.

At the conclusion of the session, the judges will award the three top posters of the meeting. These top three posters will be displayed in the registration area for the remainder of the meeting.

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Luncheon Symposia - Friday

Friday, March 241 2:15 pm - 1:45 pm

27. Function vs Cosmesis: Is There a Correct First Step?

Room: Hampton

Moderators: Janelle Epp, OT, CHT and Michael J. Feldman, MD

28. Making Burn Awareness Week Work for Your Burn Center

Room: Berkeley

Moderators: B. Daniel Dillard and Bonnie A. Jackson, RN, MSN, CCNS

29. Meet the New Editor and Find out How to Make the Journal of Burn Care and Research Work for You

Room: Riverway

Moderators: David N. Herndon, MD, FACS

30. Providing a Healthy Work Environment: Increasing Resiliency and Decreasing Moral Distress

Room: Boston Common

Moderators: Jill L. Sproul, RN, MS and Roselle E. Crombie, MD, MPH

31. Role of the Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants on the Burn Team

Room: Clarendon

Moderators: Annemarie O’Connor, RN, MSN, APN, FNP and Jeffrey W. Williams, MMS, PA-C

32. Should We Sweat the Small Stuff? Micronutrients, Vitamins, and Minerals

Room: Gardner A

Moderators: Caran Graves, RD, MS and Katherine F. Wallace, MS, RD

33. Spirituality in the Burn Center

Room: Gardner B

Moderators: Wendy Cadge and Shirley M. Massey, Rev

34. To Err is Human: Conducting PI/QI

Room: Public Garden

Moderators: Carolyn B. Blayney, RN, BSN and William J. Mohr, MD, FACS

35. The Nuts and Bolts of Verification

Room: Dalton

Moderators: Nicole S. Gibran, MD, FACS, Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN and Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

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A Roadmap for Conducting Meaningful Burn Research

Friday, March 24 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm Back Bay B Ballroom

Course Directors: Jeffrey W. Shupp, MD, FACS and Lauren Moffatt, PhD

In order to address the challenges and uncertainties involved in caring for burn patients, a multi-pronged research approach in both subject matter and study design is required that mirrors the multidisciplinary nature of burn care. Research that aims to improve treatment and outcomes for burn patients must take many shapes and involve many players, but maintain a core level of integrity and a defined structure in order to yield meaningful, publishable results that have the opportunity to be translated to care. The discussions, led by a panel of experienced professionals, focusing on their own area of interest and expertise, will be tailored to address gaps in knowledge and exposure to the research process that members may have. This session addresses the gap in understanding of the ethical implications of SM use by HCPs, patients and families, and promotes discussion of the complexities of this new form of communication in healthcare.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Identify the importance of research in shaping burn care

* Explain the process for becoming involved in meaningful research

* Identify what ABA resources are available to the members

12:15 pm - 12:15 pmIntroduction

Jeffrey W. Shupp, MD, FACS

12:15 pm - 12:30 pmBurn State of the Science Conference 2016: Gaps Identified and Path Forward

Edward E. Tredget, MD, MSc, FRCS(C)

12:30 pm - 12:45 pmPreclinical and Basic Science Research: Collaboration and Networking--Getting Out of Your Own Silo

Robert Christy, PhD

12:45 pm - 1:15 pmSystems Biology and Precision

Nitin Baliga, PhD, SVP

1:15 pm - 1:30 pmClinical Research: Retrospective Studies, Database Queries, Surveys, and Prospective Trials

Tina L. Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM

1:30 pm - 1:45 pmAmerican Burn Association Resources for Conducting Burn Research

James H. Holmes IV, MD, FACS

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Ethics Case Presentation: #140 Characters or Less: Burn Care in the Era of Social Media

Friday, March 24 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm Liberty Ballroom

Course Director: Sharmila D. Dissanaike, MD, FACS

Social media (SM) has become a pervasive part of modern culture and increasingly involves healthcare practitioners (HCP), patients and their families. Use of social media by HCP is under increasing scrutiny by regulatory authorities and healthcare institutions, since there are few predefined “rules” of engagement. This has unfortunately resulted in incidents of physicians and nurses losing their jobs and reputations over content deemed inappropriate. Conversely, social media can serve as a very useful tool to connect patients, burn survivors and families with resources and information they may otherwise not have access to. This session addresses the gap in understanding of the ethical implications of SM use by HCPs, patients and families, and promotes discussion of the complexities of this new form of communication in healthcare.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Navigate social media effectively and appropriately

* Understand both the dangers and benefits inherent in this medium

* Understand the ethical principles that are involved when using social media effectively

12:15 pm - 12:20 pmIntroduction

Sharmila D. Dissanaike, MD, FACS

12:20 pm - 12:25 pmCase Presentation - Case 1 - Violation of Patient Privacy and thus Autonomy

Roselle Crombie, MD, MPH

12:25 pm - 12:30 pmCase Presentations - Case 2 - Privacy Violations, Lack of Beneficence, Potential Maleficence to Family of Patient

Bradley Wiggins, RN, BSN

12:30 pm - 12:35 pmCase Presentation - Case 3 - Maleficence

Ariel M. Aballay, MD, FACS

12:35 pm - 12:55 pmPro/Con Debate - Pro: Social Media Can be Used to Educate, Connect, Meet Collaborators, Discuss Ideas

Kathleen S. Romanowski, MD

12:55 pm - 1:15 pmPro/Con Debate - Con: Perils of Exposure, Handling Patient Requests, Where to Draw the Line, Incidents of Problems. What to Do When it is the Patient or Family Talking About Healthcare Team--Do We Have Any Recourse?

Vimal K. Murthy, MD, FACS

1:15 pm - 1:35 pmSurvivor Viewpoint - How Does Social Media Help Patients Connect With Other Survivors, Build Community, and Form Support Networks?

Danny Gentile

1:35 pm - 1:45 pmQuestion and Answers

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Controversies in Modern Burn Care: The Pro Con Debates

Friday, March 24 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Liberty A Ballroom

Course Directors: Robert C. Cartotto, MD, FRCS(C) and Christopher W. Lentz, MD, FACS, FCCM

Not all therapeutic decisions in burn care are informed by large prospective randomized studies. Frequently there are opposing approaches to the same clinical problem. This course will highlight four controversial areas in burn treatment. Experts will defend their stance on a particular care plan or strategy. Audience polling will be used to identify the attendee’s biases before the debate and their positions after the debate to see if the presented arguments change opinions.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Differentiate between the scientific support and experience of the experts

* Appraise the science and experience from the experts

* Discuss the rationale for each of these topics

* Identify their own rationale for support the practice or be open to other treatment modalities

2:00 pm - 2:05 pmIntroduction

Robert C. Cartotto, MD, FRCS(C)

2:05 pm - 2:30 pmThe Bronchoscopic Grade of Smoke Inhalation Injury Severity is Relevant

Pro: Kevin N. Foster, MD, MBA, FACS

Con: Kevin K. Chung, MD, FCCM

2:30 pm - 3:00 pmOxandrolone Should Be Administered to All Adults With Burns ≥ 20% TBSA

Pro: Steven E. Wolf, MD, FACS

Con: Victor C. Joe, MD, FACS

3:00 pm - 3:30 pmPressure Garments Reduce Post Burn Hypertrophic Scarring and Should Be Used

Pro: Philip E. Fidler, MD, FACS

Con: Karen Kowalske, MD

3:30 pm - 4:00 pmHigh Dose Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) Should Be Used as an Adjunctive Agent

Pro: Christopher W. Lentz, MD, FACS, FCCM

Con: Robert C. Cartotto, MD, FRCS(C)

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MAC FORUM

From Competencies to Certification: Recognizing Specialty Practice of Burn Nurses and Therapists

Friday, March 24 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Constitution A Ballroom

Course Directors: Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP, Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN and Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

Currently there is no official recognition of specialty practice for burn therapists or burn nurses. This session will describe how burn nurses and burn therapist developed competencies and are pursuing specialty. The e-Delphi methodology used for the burn nurse competencies will be described and a final list of competencies with essential performance criteria presented. The burn therapist section will describe how their competencies were used as a foundation for the development of a burn therapist certification as a means of acknowledging expertise in burn rehabilitation. The history of the development of certification and detailed plans for implementation within the organization will be discussed. Certification requirements and the application process will be described for those interested in pursuing burn therapy certification.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Describe the process of developing competencies for therapists and nurses

* Discuss the status of this process for nurses and therapists

* Identify further requirements to do to move toward certification

* Explain the importance of using profession-based competencies in the evaluation of providers in their burn center to hospital administrators to gain support

* Identify the process of certification and how to gain hospital administration support

2:00 pm - 2:05 pmIntroduction

Shelley A. Wiechman, PhD, ABPP

2:05 pm - 2:50 pmBurn Nurse Competencies

Gretchen J. Carrougher, RN, MN

2:50 pm - 3:35 pmBurn Therapist Certification

Ingrid S. Parry, MS, PT

3:35 pm - 4:00 pmQuestions and Answers

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Transforming Burn Care: Updates on the Science and Clinical Practice of Lasers

Friday, March 24 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Republic Ballroom

Course Directors: Ludwik K. Branski, MD, MMS and Rajiv Sood, MD, FACS

LASER treatment is fast becoming a complimentary procedure for burn scar management. Through phototherapy and tissue ablation LASERS may accelerate the natural burn remodeling trajectory and result in a better cosmetic endpoint. Currently there are no standard protocols for the use of LASERS in burn scar treatment and there is little research to guide the burn practitioner on appropriate use of LASER in burn scar management. This course will review the science of LASERS. Leaders in burn LASER therapy will discuss current LASER research and clinical experience with LASER use in both pediatric and adult burn patients.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Relate current research in LASER burn scar therapy

* Discuss the science of LASERS

* Discuss the use of LASERS

2:00 pm - 2:05 pmIntroduction

Ludwik K. Branski, MD, MMS

2:05 pm - 2:20 pmWhy Use Lasers?

R. Rox Anderson, MD, FACS

2:20 pm - 2:35 pmIs Burn Scar Excision a Surgical Dodo Bird? Science Validates the Virtues of Laser Treatment

Matthias B. Donelan, MD, FACS

2:35 pm - 2:50 pmProspective Evaluation of the ScaarFX Laser Modality for Hypertrophic Burn Scars

Rajiv Sood, MD, FACS

2:50 pm - 3:00 pmPanel Discussion

R. Rox Anderson, MD, FACS

Matthias B. Donelan, MD, FACS

Rajiv Sood, MD, FACS

3:00 pm - 3:15 pmLasers: Past, Present and Future Directions

William Norbury, MD

3:15 pm - 3:30 pmThis Little Light of Mine: Reflections on the Ins and Outs of a Busy Laser Practice Focused on Remodeling Burn Scars

Renee Edkins, DNP, MA, NP-C

3:30 pm - 3:45 pmLaser Therapy in Pediatric Burn Scars: Early Insights and Outcomes

Charis Kelly, RN (EC), MN, NP-C

3:45 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion

William Norbury, MD

Renee Edkins, DNP, MA, NP-C

Charis Kelly, RN (EC), MN, NP-C

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Utilizing Legislation as a Tool for Prevention and Change

Friday, March 24 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Back Bay A Ballroom

Course Directors: Jennifer Radics-Johnson, MBA and Karla Ahrns-Klas, RN, BSN, CCRP

The ABA and its members are committed to improving the quality of care provided to burn patients. The ABA monitors changes in the legislative and policy arenas that may affect its membership. Through its annual National Leadership Conference, ongoing communications with government agencies such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service and the Consumer Product Safety Commission as well its work with other medical specialty societies, the ABA seeks to keep abreast of these “of the moment” issues - reimbursement, prevention, quality of care - and affect their outcome to benefit burn care providers and institutions with burn centers. Despite, the ABA’s advocacy and legislative initiatives and work, many ABA members, including burn care professionals, fire departments and burn foundations, do not know about the power of legislation and how it can help set standards on a local, state or federal level, as well as possibly bring funding to projects and research. This proposed course will cover the importance of legislation for burn care professionals and how they can use legislation as a powerful tool in their work to advocate for their burn units, burn patients and communities. Also, the course will cover the path to legislation including: strategic planning/ preparation (research, collecting/presenting data, collecting testimonies, etc.) and identifying/engaging key stakeholders (ABA, CPSC, NFPA, IAFF, medical equipment groups, visiting nurse/ medical care groups, etc.), as well as provide examples of how legislation has been used to successfully save lives.

As a result of attending this activity, the learner should be able to:

* Describe the importance of legislation in the burn community

* Describe the steps needed to set the stage for an ask

* Give examples of ways legislation was used in the burn community

* Understand what is the National Leadership Conference and how it can assist with legislative change

2:00 pm - 2:05 pmWelcome and Introductions

Jennifer Radics-Johnson, MBA

Karla Ahrns-Klas, RN, BSN, CCRP

2:05 pm - 2:25 pmPrevention Legislation That Has Successfully Saved Lives

Ernest Grant, PhD, MSN, RN, FAAN

2:25 pm - 2:40 pmUtilizing the National Leadership Conference as an Opportunity for Change

Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS

2:40 pm - 2:45 pmIdentifying and Engaging Key Stakeholders: Working With Community Partners

Karla Ahrns-Klas, RN, BSN, CCRP

2:45 pm - 3:05 pmIdentifying and Engaging Key Stakeholders: Working With the Fire Department

Phillip J. Tammaro, FF

3:05 pm - 3:20 pmIdentifying and Engaging Key Stakeholders: Working With Burn Survivors

Amy Acton, RN, BSN

Executive Director, Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

3:20 pm - 3:35 pmIdentifying and Engaging Key Stakeholders: Working with the NFPA

Lorraine Carli, MA

3:35 pm - 4:00 pmPanel Discussion and Q & A with Speakers

President Michael D. Peck, MD, ScD, FACS

cordially invites the attendees of the 2017 Annual Meeting to an evening celebrating the

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49th Anniversary of the American Burn Association Annual Banquet

Friday, March 24, 2017

Cocktail Reception

7:00 pm

Lobby Grand Ballroom

Dinner

8:00 pm

Grand Ballroom

Sheraton Boston Hotel

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Poster Sessions (18 Categories)

Hynes Convention Hall D

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Poster Session I: Abstracts #127 - 212

* Critical Care - Translational

* Nursing

* Reconstruction

* Outpatient Burn Management

* Critical Care

* Psychosocial

* Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention

* Quality Improvement

* Wounds - Translational

Poster Set-Up (for Wednesday Rounds)   Tuesday, March 21, 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Rounds with Professors and Authors   Wednesday, March 22, 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Poster Dismantle   Wednesday, March 22, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Poster Session II: Abstracts #213 - 301

* Nutrition, Metabolism

* Pain, Agitation, Delirium, Itch

* Rehabilitation

* Wounds - Clinical

* Critical Care II

* Psychosocial II

* Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention II

* Quality Improvement II

* Wounds - Translational II

Poster Set-Up (for Thursday Rounds)   Wednesday, March 22, 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Poster Viewing   Thursday, March 23, 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Poster Dismantle   Thursday, March 23, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Poster Viewing Hours

Refer to the Program Book Summary

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Wine & Cheese Reception with Authors

Wednesday, March 22 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

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Poster Session I: Abstracts #127–212

Critical Care - Translational

Moderators: Michael J. Mosier, MD, FACS, FCCM and Jennifer E. Kesey, RN, MSN, FNP-BC

127. Post-Burn Stress Signals Alter the Epigenetic Landscape of Transposable Repetitive Elements

128. Is Albumin Creatinine Ratio (ACR) a Prognostic Indicator in Adults with Severe Burns?

129. Alterations in Microvesicle Production Following Burn or Burn/Infection

130. Myokine Musclin Expression is Elevated in Rats After Burn

131. Fluid Deprivation Exacerbates Renal Dysfunction and Under-Perfusion in a Porcine 40% TBSA Burn Model

132. Artificial Intelligence in Burn Care: A Proof-of-Concept Review

133. Foundations for a North American SJS/TEN Research Network: Results of a Web-Based Survey of Dermatologists and Surgeons

134. Buprenorphine SR Alters Hemodynamic Parameters in a Rat Burn Model

135. Spontaneous Random Mobility and Impaired Directionality During Chemotaxis as New Aspects of Neutrophil Dysfunction in Burn Patients: Role of Protein Farnesylation

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Nursing

Moderators: Sandra J. Yovino, RN, BSN, MHA and Jennifer Boyd, MSN, RN

136. Nurse Driven Fluid Resuscitation Protocol: Maintaining Nurse Competency for High-Risk Low-Volume Patient Population

137. One University Burn Center’s Experience with Decreasing CAUTI

138. The Lived Experience of the Advanced Practice Provider in the Burn Surgery Specialty

139. Standardized Daily Wound Care Plan: A Success for Interdisciplinary Communication

140. Burn Dressing Passport

141. Sleep Disturbances Experienced by Military Bum Survivors

142. Development of a Nursing Driven Burn Resuscitation Protocol

143. Nurse Implemented Postoperative Mobility Program

144. Peer Mentorship as a Model to Increase Nursing Competency in a Burn Intensive Care Setting

145. Differences in Burn Wound Assessment and Terminology Among Three Burn Centers

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Reconstruction

Moderators: Lawrence J. Gottlieb, MD, FACS and Michael J. Feldman, MD, FACS

146. Comparison of Effects of Intermittent and Continuous Application of Tourniquet During Escharectomy and Skin Transplantation in Patients With Full-Thickness Hand Burns

147. Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars Using 1064nm Long-pulsed Nd:YAG LASER

148. Form Versus Function: Dealing with Postburn Nasal Stenosis in Children

149. Does Laser Therapy work the Same Way for All Patients? A Preliminary Study

150. A Prospective Self Controlled Trial of Fractional CO2 Laser Alone Versus Combination of CO2 Laser Continuous Pinpoint Irradiation Technique With Fractional CO2 Laser in Treatment of Hypertrophic Scar

151. Effectiveness of Supercharged Skin Pedicled Flaps for Anterior Neck Contracture Reconstruction

152. Thin and Ultra-thin Split-Thickness Skin Grafts in the Treatment of Hand Burns

153. Functional and Cosmetic Outcomes Following Neck Burn Injuries

154. Electrospun Mupirocin Loaded Polyurethane Fiber Mats for Anti-Infection Burn Wound Dressing Application

155. Post Burn Pseudo Boutonniere Deformity: Recognition and Prevention

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Outpatient Burn Management

Moderators: Kevin N. Foster, MD, MBA, FACS and Michael A. Serghiou, OTR, MBA

156. Comparison of Cardiac Monitoring Techniques in a Long-Term Study of Pediatric Burn Patients

157. Survivor Feedback on Research and Network Content

158. Prevalence of Pain in Pediatric Burn Survivors After Discharge from Hospitalization

159. Pain Prevalence and Opioid Use in Children Recovering from Burn Injuries

160. Wide Awake Local Anesthesia No Tourniquet (WALANT) Technique as a Sedation-Limiting Technique for Treating Isolated Hand Burns

161. Effects of Treating Second Degree Burns with Collagenase Everyday Versus Every Other Day

162. Race and Ethnicity Influence Burn Survivor Perception of Recovery After Injury

163. Effects of Propranolol on Lung Spirometry in Severely Burned Children With Inhalation Injury

164. Fatigue Following Burn Injury: A Burn Model System National Database Study

165. Discharge Instruction Modality in Burn Care

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Critical Care

Moderators: Laura S. Johnson, MD, FACS and Kate O. Pape, PharmD

166. A Retrospective Analysis of Medical Management, Surgical Interventions, and Outcomes over a 5-year Period in Patients with Electrical Injuries

167. Risk Factors Necessitating Early Ophthalmologic Evaluation of Facial Burns

168. Outcomes in the Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Burn Injury and ARDS

169. Prompt Laparotomy and Early Closure Dramatically Improve Survival in Burn Patients with Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

170. Does a Standardized Fluid Resuscitation Protocol Improve Patient Outcomes?

171. How Does Blood Loss Relate to the Extent of Surgical Wound Excision?

172. Return to Boomtown: A Comparison of Oil Industry and Matched Non-Oil Industry Patient Outcomes

173. Evaluation of HLA Sensitization in Burn Patients After Treatment with Skin Allografts and Transfusion of Blood Products

174. Comparison of Pretreatment Variables, Burn Severity Indices, and Machine Learning for Predicting Mortality in Severely Burned Patients Requiring Active Fluid Resuscitation

175. Is the qSOFA Score an Independent Predictor for Burn Injury Complications and Mortality?

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Psychosocial

Moderators: Lisa Forbes-Duchart, OT, Reg and Brett D. Arnoldo, MD

176. Interaction Between Physical, Functional, and Psychosocial Sequelae of Burn Injury: A Burn Model System Study

177. The Psychometric Properties of the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief

178. Is Bullying a Problem for Burn-injured Youth? Does Visible Scarring Increase the Risk?

179. Developing the LIBRE Profile Short Forms to Measure the Social Impact of Burn Injuries

180. Impact of a Week-Long Retreat for Young Women with Disfiguring Conditions

181. Assessing Appearance Concerns in Burn Injured Children Ages 5–18

182. End-of-life Decision-making: The Role of Palliative Care Consultation in Burn Management

183. Quality of Life Impairments in Youth 0–3 years in an Outpatient Pediatric Specialty Burn Clinic

184. Depression Screening In The Outpatient Burn Clinic

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Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention

Moderators: Lisa Rae, MD, MS and Taryn E. Travis, MD

185. Burn Injury & E-cigarettes: An Emerging Public Health Issue

186. Firehouse Partnering with a Burn Center: Making an Impact on Community Safety

187. No Evidence of Race-Based Disparities in Burn Mortality: A Single Institution Study from 2004 - 2013

188. Hand Hygiene: Alcohol is Best!

189. An Analysis of the Risk Factors and Frequency of Completed and Attempted Self-Inflicted Suicide by Burn in Minority Populations

190. The Management and Outcome of Electric Burn Injuries: A Retrospective Study of 595 Patients

191. UV-C Light as an Adjunct to Infection Control in a Pediatric Burn Hospital

192. Comparison of Military and Civilian Burn Patients Admitted to a Single Center During War Time

193. Elucidating the Role of Concurrent Non-Thermal Trauma in Burn Injury Morbidity and Mortality

194. Younger Patients Receive More Hospital Care than the Elderly after Similar Scald Injury

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Quality Improvement

Moderators: Gerarda M. Bozinko, RN, MSN, CCRN and Howard G. Smith, MD, FACS

195. Effectiveness of Ablative Fractional Laser on Burn Related Scar

196. Analysis of EKGs Associated with Pediatric Electrical Burns

197. A Mobile App to Improve Appropriate Burn Center Utilization - Description and Preliminary Usage

198. Length of Stay and Quality of Care in the Burn Patient

199. A Retrospective Study of Fungal Prophylaxis in Burn Patients

200. Burn Patients’ Perception of Their Care: What Can We Learn From Post-Discharge Satisfaction Surveys?

201. A Review of the First Seminar that Set the Stage for Formation of the American Burn Association

202. Mini-Mass Casualty Incident: Successes and Lessons

203. The Use of Electromagnetic Feeding Tube Placement Device in Pediatric Burn Population

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Wounds - Translational

Moderators: Kuzhali Muthu, PhD and Jeremy Goverman, MD

204. Hyper and Hypopigmentation in Burn Scar: A Characterization of the Canonical Pigmentation Signaling Cascade

205. Compression Modulates a Wide Range of Biological Functions and Pathways in a Red Duroc Model of Hypertrophic Scar

206. Hypertrophic Scar Formation Following Partial Thickness Burns: A Porcine Model

207. The Role of Rapid Enzymatic Debridement in Burn Mass Casualty Incidents: Lessons Learned from Ground Breaking Experience in the 2015 Bucharest Nightclub Fire

208. Multifunctional Elastin-like Polypeptide Nanoparticles Accelerates Wound Healing

209. Early Application of Pressure Garments Reduces Scarring Following Full-Thickness Burn Injury

210. Omega-7 Accelerates Healing of Grafted Skin Burn Wounds

211. 2.5% vs 5% Mafenide Acetate: In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity Varies with Concentration

212. PEGylated PFP Hydrogel Based Vasculogenic Dermal Substitutes

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Poster Session II: Abstracts #213–301

Nutrition, Metabolism

Moderators: Maggie L. Dylewski, PhD, RD and Charles J. Yowler, MD, FACS

213. Interruptions in Nutritional Support: How Close are We to Providing Prescribed Enteral Nutrition?

214. The Effect Of Prealbumin and C-Reactive Protein On Assessing Nutritional Adequacy in Pediatric Burn Patients

215. Oral Nutrition Supplements and Nutritional Adequacy in Pediatric Burn Patients

216. Diabetes in Burn Patients - Does it Matter?

217. Hepatic Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in the Elderly Display Delayed Recovery from Severe Burn Injury

218. Prealbumin and C-Reactive Protein Levels Predict Clinical Outcomes in Burn Patients

219. Feasibility of Diagnosing Malnutrition in a Burn Center

220. Abnormal Mitochondrial Fusion and Fission are Associated with Profound Hepatic Metabolic Alterations After Thermal Injury in Obese Mice

221. Parenteral Amino Acid Infusion Increases Leg Protein Synthesis Rate and Reduces Catabolism in Pediatric Burn Patients

222. Incidence of Hypoglycemia in Burn Patients: A Focus for Process Improvement

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Pain, Agitation, Delirium, Itch

Moderators: Patricia J. Faris, PharmD, BCPS and Tam N. Pham, MD, FACS

223. Virtual Reality Distraction for Children with Large Severe Burns During Repeated Burn Wound Debridement in the ICU

224. Risk Factors and Prevalence of QTc Prolongation in Adult Burn Patients Receiving Methadone

225. Effects of Early Gabapentin Initiation on Chronic Pain and Itch in Burn Patients

226. Efficacy and Safety of Sublingual Sufentanil for the Management of Acute Moderate to Severe Pain

227. Effect of an Inpatient Neuropathic Pain and Itch Protocol on Gabapentin Use and Patient Reported Outcomes

228. The Combination of Hydromorphone, Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine Infusions Provide Safe and Effective Post-operative Pain Control for Pediatric Burn Patients

229. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Acute Pain Management: A Prospective Study

230. Outcomes of a Pediatric and Adult Sedation Service in a Regional Burn Center Using Nurse Practitioners

231. Burn Injury Induced Alterations in Drug Metabolism and Effect: Role of Serum Albumin

232. Low-Dose Ketamine Infusion in Acute Burn Patients Improves Analgesia and Reduces Opioid Consumption After Infusion Completion

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Rehabilitation

Moderators: Karen J. Kowalske, MD and David Lorello, DPT

233. Development of Vascularized Human Three Dimensional Skin Equivalents in vitro

234. The HAAT Flap: Nerve Sparing Homodigital Artery Antegrade Transposition Flap for Dorsal PIP Joint Coverage in the Burned Hand

235. Surgical Management of Electrical Injuries Using “Spare Parts Surgery”

236. An External Wire Frame Fixation Method of Skin Grafting for Burn Reconstruction

237. Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation - An Emerging Concept for Burn Reconstruction

238. Reconstructive Treatment of Children’s Hands by Distant Pedicled Flaps from the Abdomen and Back: A Case Series

239. Use of Indocyanine Green Laser Angiography in a Pediatric Burn Hospital: Case Series Review of 8 Patients Undergoing Reconstruction

240. Acute Burn Reconstruction of the Breast

241. SCAR-Q: Developing a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument for the Pediatric and Adult Burn, Surgical, and Traumatic Scar Populations

242. Breast Burns: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Cosmetic Considerations

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Wounds - Clinical

Moderators: Leopoldo C. Cancio, MD, FACS and Kelli Yukon, RN

243. Experience and Outcomes of Micrografting in Major Paediatric Burns

244. Efficacy of Silver-Coated Dressings in Pediatric Burn Care

245. Relationship Between Scar Severity, Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction -Endothelial Dysfunction May Promote the Development and Aggravation of Pathologic Scars

246. Thin and Ultra-Thin Split-Thickness Skin Grafts are Safe and Efficacious in the Burn Population

247. Accuracy of Pre-Hospital Care Providers in Determining Total Body Surface Area Burned in Severe Pediatric Thermal Injury

248. Bromelain Based Enzymatic Debridement of Chronic Wounds: Results of a Multicenter Phase II Trial

249. Fournier’s Gangrene: Is Wide Radical Debridement Still Necessary? An Alternative Approach to Improving Outcomes Using Skin and Soft Tissue Sparing Flap Preservation Surgery

250. Faster Wound Healing of Enzymatically Debrided Deep Dermal Burns by Using Sprayed Autologous Keratinocytes

251. Functional Outcomes After Enzymatic Debridement of Hand Burns

252. A Novel Bioresorbable, Biointegratable, Biocompatible Dressing for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

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Critical Care II

Moderators: Steven A. Kahn, MD and J. Bradley Wiggins, RN, BSN

253. Frailty Influences the Subjective Decision to Conduct a Goals of Care Discussion with Burned Elders

254. A National Perspective on ECMO Utilization in Patients with Burn Injury

255. Clinical and Financial Implications of Inhaled Vasodilators in the Burn ICU Patient

256. Enhancing Current Practice with Technology: Digitizing a Manual Heads-up Display

257. Inhalation Injury Increases Mortality Risk in Civilian but Not Military Burn Patients

258. Working Toward a National Burns Disaster Plan for the UK

259. Reading Tea Leaves: Markers for Infection in Patients with Burn Injuries Using a Sepsis Algorithm

260. Combination Intravenous and Inhaled Colistin Therapy During a Burn Center Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumanii

261. Use of Midline Catheters in Burn Patients Decreases Central Line Placement and Infection Rates

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Psychosocial II

Moderators: Kristen C. Quinn, MEd, LPC, CCLS and Michael A. Marano, MD, FACS

262. Routine Psychological Screening for Parent Distress Symptoms in an Outpatient Pediatric Specialty Burn Clinic

263. “This is it...I’m Giving Up”: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient-Perceived Gaps in Mental Health Care After Major Burn Injury

264. Implementation of Stress Disorder Screening and Education into Clinical Practice

265. Pain, Stress and Fatigue Assessment of Staff at a Pediatric Burns and Plastic Surgery Hospital Justifies Alexander Technique Program

266. Differences in Parent and Provider Perceptions of Children’s Anxiety in the Outpatient Clinic

267. The Role of Parent Psychosocial Functioning and Time in the Pediatric Burn Survivors’ Perceptions of Daily Stressors

268. An Examination of a Yoga Intervention with Young Adult Burn Survivors

269. Impact of a Multi-Day Burn Support Conference on Adult Burn Survivors and Family

270. Assessing Emotional Concerns of Children with Burn Injuries

271. Should Burn Injured Youth Attend Burn Camp or Would a Typical Summer Camp Experience Provide the Same Benefits?

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Public Health, Epidemiology, Prevention II

Moderators: David G. Greenhalgh, MD, FACS and Cindy L. Nederveld, RN

272. A Web-Based Technology Changes RN-BSN Students’ Knowledge About Burn Prevention

273. Review and Comparison of Best Practice in the Identification and Management of Child Maltreatment by Burn Injury

274. Don’t Be Burned: e-Cigarette Explosions Resulting in Injury

275. The State of Firework Laws and Injury Tracking

276. Lithium Ion Battery Explosion: A Cause of Significant Burn Morbidity

277. Positive Blood Alcohol Level on Admission Associated with Increased Mortality

278. The Unrecognized Epidemic of Electronic Cigarette Burns

279. Research on Tetanus Treatment with Tetanus Quick Test of Burn Patients Admitted to the Emergency Department

280. Length of Stay and Discharge Disposition are Negatively Impacted by Obesity in Pediatric Burn Patients

281. Development and Preliminary Results from Scald a Prevention Program in a Pediatric Clinic

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Quality Improvement II

Moderators: Jody M. Rood, RN and Steven Moulton, MD, FACS

282. Improving Infection Rates in Burn Patients Using a Chlorhexidine Bathing Protocol

283. If a Tree Falls in a Forest: The Fate of Abstracts Presented at the 2012 American Burn Association Annual Meeting

284. Utilization of Advanced Practice Providers Increases Patient Satisfaction on Acute Care Burn Unit

285. Critical Analysis of Transfers to a Regional Burn Center: Lessons Learned and Recommendations

286. Clinical Significance of Accurate Total Hemoglobin Measurements in the Perioperative Setting

287. Burn Treatment Board, a Model of Communication in the Burn Intensive Care Unit

288. Evaluation of Wound Rounds Using Remote Videoconferencing: Patient and Staff Experience

289. Burn Photo Documentation Survey of ABA Members

290. Microbiological Study of Enteral Feeding Administration: Can Hang Time be Increased Without Compromising Patient Safety?

291. The Mouth Impairment and Disability Assessment

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Wounds - Translational II

Moderators: Lauren T. Moffatt, PhD and Rodney K. Chan, MD, FACS

292. Modulation of Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells by Acellular Dermal Matrix for Treatment of Chronic Wounds

293. Burn Injury Effects NF Kappa B (NFB) Expression in Non Injured Skin

294. Autologous Skin Tissue Columns in Porcine Deep Partial-Thickness Burn Wound Healing

295. Screening of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Library for the Suppression of Extracellular Matrix Deposition and Fibroblast Proliferation of Scar Tissues from Burn Patients

296. Ablative Laser Penetration Depth as Function of Scar Properties

297. Surfactant-Based Dressings Prevent Biofilm Formation in Ex-Vivo Porcine Skin

298. MMP-9 Mediated Alterations in Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction Associated with Burn Trauma

299. Electroceutical Disruption of Polymicrobial Bacterial Biofilm in a Porcine Pre Clinical Model

300. Topical Minocycline Hydrogel Penetrates the Eschar of a Full-Thickness Burn and Significantly Reduces Subeschar Tissue Biopsy Bacterial Counts

301. Propranolol Does Not Impair Skin Blood Flow in Burned and Non-Burned Skin Under Thermal Neutral and Warm Ambient Environments in Children

© 2017 The American Burn Association