Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Human Fibroblast–Like Cultures in the Presence of Platelet-Rich Plasma as a Single Growth Factor Source: Clinical Implications

Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier PhD; Luna-Bertos, Elvira de PhD; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco J. MS; García-Martínez, Olga PhD; Ruiz, Concepción PhD

Advances in Skin & Wound Care: March 2014 - Volume 27 - Issue 3 - p 114–120
doi: 10.1097/01.ASW.0000443266.17665.19
Features: Original Investigations

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the proliferation, morphology, and antigenic expression of human fibroblast–like cells between primary cultures treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or fetal bovine serum (FBS) as the growth factor source.

DESIGN: Cells from human gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy volunteers during oral surgery were studied. Isolated cells were cultured in media supplemented with 10% PRP or FBS. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from the venous blood of each patient. The authors studied short- and long-term cell cultures in the presence of PRP or FBS as the sole growth factor source in order to determine (a) cell growth rate, by MTT (3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay; (b) cell morphology, by electronic microscopy; and (c) antigenic expression, by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

RESULTS: In short-term cultures, the cell growth rate was higher with PRP versus FBS treatment. No differences in morphology or expression of vimentin, fibronectin, or α-actin antigens were observed between PRP and FBS cultures. In long-term cultures, PRP and FBS did not significantly differ in cell growth rate but differed in morphology and in the expression of vimentin, fibronectin, and α-actin.

CONCLUSION: The PRP enhances cell proliferation over the short term and induces cell differentiation of fibroblast-like cells to myofibroblast-like cells over the long term, suggesting that fibroblast differentiation to myofibroblasts may underlie the action mechanism of PRP in soft tissue regeneration.

Javier Ramos-Torrecillas, PhD, is a member of the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Spain. Elvira de Luna-Bertos, PhD, is a member of the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Spain. Francisco J. Manzano-Moreno, MS, is a PhD student in the Department of Odontology and Stomatology, Faculty of Odontology, University of Granada, Spain. Olga García-Martínez, PhD, is a member of the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Spain. Concepción Ruiz, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.

Acknowledgments: This study was supported by research group BIO277 (Junta de Andalucía) and by the Department of Nursing of the Health Sciences School of the University of Granada. The authors thank José Antonio Muñoz Gámez at Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, the Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, and the Servicio Andaluz de Salud (Junta de Andalucia), for their technical support in the laboratory. The authors have disclosed that they have no financial relationships related to this article. Submitted February 14, 2013; accepted in revised form August 6, 2013.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All world rights reserved.