Skip Navigation LinksHome > February 2013 - Volume 26 - Issue 2 > Use of Indigenously Made Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy Sys...
Advances in Skin & Wound Care:
doi: 10.1097/01.ASW.0000426716.51702.29
Features: Case Series

Use of Indigenously Made Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy System for Patients with Diabetic Foot

Saraiya, Hemant A. MS, MCh(Plastic); Shah, Mukesh N. MS

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a well-known treatment modality for chronic, difficult, nonhealing wounds. Unfortunately, many commercially available negative-pressure therapy systems for wounds are expensive, require hospitalization, and may not be available throughout the world. The authors have designed a less expensive and effective NPWT system from components readily available in the hospital.

DESIGN: The system is assembled from ethylene oxide sterilized polyurethane foam, transparent adhesive dressing, and a simple negative suction drain system, which is being routinely used in surgical cases. The multiple holes suction tube is inserted between 2 layers of polyurethane foam and is put on the wound, which is sealed by adhesive dressing. The negative pressure is created using a closed wound suction set. The dressing is changed every third day or as needed.

MAIN RESULTS: The authors have used this system in 11 patients with diabetic foot. The mean time for preparation of wound for surgery with this system was 7 days (5–9 days). The raw areas were either secondarily closed or were covered with split-thickness skin graft. The mean hospital stay for debridement and definitive surgical procedure was 11 days (8–15 days).

CONCLUSION: In the authors’ experience, the NPWT system developed from off-the-shelf components reduces the length of hospital stays and therefore cost, without any compromise on quality. It leads to a quicker wound closure and reduces the need for multiple surgeries or flaps. This modification presents a simple, cheap, and effective alternative to commercially available NPWT machines.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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