Share this article on:

Desflurane Versus Sevoflurane

Boncyk, John C. MD

doi: 10.1213/01.ANE.0000156706.95000.D7
Letters to the Editor: Letters & Announcements

Department of Anesthesiology; University of Wisconsin Medical School; Madison, WI; jcboncyk@facstaff.wisc.edu

Back to Top | Article Outline

To the Editor:

I enjoyed your recent article regarding desflurane and sevoflurane. However, I am unsure one can say that the oxygen saturations were better in the desflurane group versus the sevoflurane group because of the anesthetic used. Could the differences have been attributable to the amount of oxygen delivered to the patients on arrival to the postanesthesia care unit? I could not find any note regarding the oxygen supplementation or lack thereof on arrival to the postanesthesia care unit. Was supplemental oxygen delivered to these patients and, if so, how was the amount delivered determined? A similar study explicitly stated that oxygen given to the patients postoperatively was standardized to all the patients (2). I wish the Strum et al. article (1) had explicitly stated what oxygen was delivered to the patients on arrival to the postanesthesia care unit so that we could eliminate variations in oxygen administration as a possible cause for differences in Spo2 on arrival to the postanesthesia care unit.

John C. Boncyk, MD

Department of Anesthesiology

University of Wisconsin Medical School

Madison, WI

jcboncyk@facstaff.wisc.edu

Back to Top | Article Outline

References

1. Strum EM, Szenohradszki J, Kaufman WA, et al. Emergence and recovery characteristics of desflurane versus sevoflurane in morbidly obese adult surgical patients: A prospective, randomized study. Anesth Analg 2004;99:1848–53.
2. Juvin P, Vadam C, Malek L, Dupont H, et al. Postoperative recovery after desflurane, propofol, or isoflurane anesthesia among morbidly obese patients: A prospective, randomized study. Anesth Analg 2000;91:714–9.
© 2005 International Anesthesia Research Society