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Neighboring Look-A-Likes: Distinguishing Between Breast and Dermatologic Lesions

Desman, Garrett T. MD; Ozerdem, Ugur MD; Shin, Sandra J. MD

Advances in Anatomic Pathology: July 2014 - Volume 21 - Issue 4 - p 228–247
doi: 10.1097/PAP.0000000000000025
Review Articles

Due to the proximity of the skin, subcutis, and axilla to the breast, the possibility of a “breast mass” actually representing a dermatologic lesion should be considered, particularly if the proliferation does not look characteristically “mammary” in appearance. Even more underappreciated is the scenario of a dermatologic proliferation morphologically masquerading as a breast tumor. The pathologist can fall prey to this pitfall if he/she is led to believe that the location of the tumor is the breast proper. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of dermatologic mimickers of breast lesions and helpful ways to discern between them when possible.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Reprints: Sandra J. Shin, MD, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Starr 1031D, 525 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065 (e-mail: sjshin@med.cornell.edu).

All figures can be viewed online in color at http://www.anatomicpathology.com.

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.