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Effect of a Prolonged Endurance Marathon on Vascular Endothelial and Inflammation Markers in Runners with Exercise-Induced Hypertension

Jee, Haemi PhD; Park, Jaehyun PhD; Oh, Jae-Gun PhD; Lee, Yoon-Hee PhD; Shin, Kyung-A PhD; Kim, Young-Joo PhD

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation:
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e31829232db
Original Research Articles
Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to observe the changes in endothelial and inflammatory markers in middle-aged male runners with exercise-induced hypertension (EIH) at baseline and at 100-km, 200-km, and 308-km checkpoints during a prolonged endurance ultramarathon.

Design: Among a total of 62 ultramarathon volunteers, 8 with systolic blood pressure higher than 210 mm Hg and 8 with normal systolic blood pressure were selected for this study. The subjects were designated to EIH and control (CON) groups. Blood was collected for the analysis of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule–1, soluble E-selectin, leukocytes, creatine kinase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

Results: Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 showed a significantly greater increase in the EIH group than in the CON group at 100 km and 200 km. Soluble E-selectin also showed a significantly greater increase in the EIH group than in the CON group at 100 km. Leukocytes significantly increased in the EIH group than in the CON group at 308 km. Creatine kinase and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein showed no group differences.

Conclusions: Leukocytes, creatine kinase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein showed delayed-onset increases in both groups. Increased exercise intensity may stimulate greater endothelial responses independent of the inflammatory markers in EIH. The loss of a protective effect may be greater in those with EIH than in CONs. Acknowledging and prescribing proper exercise intensity may be critical in preventing possible vascular-related complications in runners with EIH.

Author Information

From the Department of Health & Fitness Management, Namseoul University, South Korea (HJ); School of Information and Communication, Inha University, South Korea (JP); Department of Sports Medicine (J-GO) and Department of Exercise Physiology (Y-HL), National Sport University, South Korea; Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Shinsung University, South Korea (K-AS); and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Sanggye-Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul, South Korea (Y-JK).

All correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to: Young-Joo Kim, PhD, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Sanggye-Paik Hospital, Inje University, Sanggye 7 dong 761-7, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-707, South Korea.

Supported, in part, by INHA UNIVERSITY Research Grant.

Disclosures: Financial disclosure statements have been obtained, and no conflicts of interest have been reported by the authors or by any individuals in control of the content of this article.

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins