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American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation:
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e3181a0de3a
Original Research Article: Cerebral Palsy

Relationships Between Gross Motor Functions and Health-Related Quality of Life of Taiwanese Children with Cerebral Palsy

Liu, Wen-Yu PhD; Hou, Yu-Jen MS; Wong, Alice M. K. MD; Lin, Pay-Shin DrPD; Lin, Yang-Hua PhD; Chen, Chia-Ling MD, PhD

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Abstract

Liu W-Y, Hou Y-J, Wong AMK, Lin P-S, Lin Y-H, Chen C-L: Relationships between gross motor functions and health-related quality of life of Taiwanese children with cerebral palsy.

Objective: To examine the relationships between gross motor functions and physical and psychosocial components of the health-related quality of life of children with cerebral palsy.

Design: Participants comprising 90 children (53 boys, 37 girls; mean age ± SD = 8.2 ± 2.4 yrs) with cerebral palsy were enrolled by a cross-sectional design. Gross motor function measure was used to quantify their gross motor functions. Their health-related quality of life was determined by the Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form 50 (traditional Chinese version), completed by their caregivers.

Results: A significant moderate positive correlation (r = 0.73, P < 0.01) existed between the physical summary scores of the Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form 50 and gross motor function measure, 66 scores in Taiwanese children with cerebral palsy. There was no significant correlation between the psychosocial summary scores of Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form 50 and gross motor function measure, 66 scores in cerebral palsy (r = −0.13, P = 0.23).

Conclusions: Gross motor functions may be good predictors of the physical component of health-related quality of life, but they are poor predictors of the psychosocial component of health-related quality of life in children with cerebral palsy. In the future, more comprehensive information regarding children’s comorbidities may need to be objectively gathered to provide professionals a better understanding of their health-related quality of life.

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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