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Using Functional Hemodynamic Indicators to Guide Fluid Therapy

Bridges, Elizabeth PhD, RN, CCNS

AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000429754.15255.eb
Feature Articles
Abstract

Overview: Hemodynamic monitoring has traditionally relied on such static pressure measurements as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure to guide fluid therapy. Over the past 15 years, however, there's been a shift toward less invasive or noninvasive monitoring methods, which use “functional” hemodynamic indicators that reflect ventilator-induced changes in preload and thereby more accurately predict fluid responsiveness. The author reviews the physiologic principles underlying functional hemodynamic indicators, describes how the indicators are calculated, and discusses when and how to use them to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

In Brief

A review of the physiologic principles underlying functional hemodynamic indicators, how these indicators are calculated, and when and how to use them to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients

Author Information

Elizabeth Bridges is an associate professor in biobehavioral nursing and health systems at the University of Washington School of Nursing and a clinical nurse researcher at the University of Washington Medical Center, both in Seattle. Contact author: ebridges@u.washington.edu. The author and planners have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.