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Preventing and Responding to Acute Kidney Injury

Vrtis, Mary C. PhD, MA, MSN, RN

AJN, American Journal of Nursing: April 2013 - Volume 113 - Issue 4 - pp 38,47
doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000428738.33180.2f
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Overview: Acute kidney injury is an independent risk factor for both prolonged length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality. Recent analysis shows that over the past decade the incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis rose rapidly in the United States, with associated death more than doubling. In 2007, the Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a new classification system for acute kidney injury, which recognized that incremental changes in kidney function may adversely affect outcomes. By identifying the signs and symptoms of acute kidney injury in its early stages, nurses may be able to help reduce the severity of injury and contribute to improved outcomes.

By identifying the signs and symptoms of acute kidney injury in its early stages, nurses may be able to help reduce the severity of injury and contribute to improved outcomes

Mary C. Vrtis is a legal nurse consultant at Aperio Medical Legal Consultants in Front Royal, VA, and director of professional services for Medi Home Health in Manassas, VA. Contact author: marycvrtis@aperiomlc.com. The author and planners have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.