You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Outcomes and Complications After Bariatric Surgery

Gagnon, Lauren E. BSN, RN; Karwacki Sheff, Emily J. MS, FNP-BC, CMSRN

AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000418920.45600.7a
Feature Articles
Abstract

Overview: Bariatric surgery is an effective and increasingly common treatment for obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. There are currently two major categories of such surgery, grouped according to the predominant mechanism of action: restrictive procedures, such as vertical banded gastroplasty and adjustable gastric banding; and malabsorptive procedures with a restrictive component, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. In general, the more complex the procedure, the better the results in terms of weight loss; but there's evidence that more complex procedures also have higher morbidity and mortality rates. This article outlines five of the most common procedures, discusses the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery, and describes the nursing implications for pre- and postoperative patient care.

In Brief

This article outlines five of the most common surgical procedures, discusses outcomes and complications, and describes the nursing implications for pre- and postoperative patient care.

Author Information

Lauren E. Gagnon is a nurse on the cardiovascular surgical unit at Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, NH, where Emily J. Karwacki Sheff is the nursing practice and standards coordinator. Karwacki Sheff is also a clinical instructor in the School of Nursing at MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. Contact author: Emily J. Karwacki Sheff, esheff@cmc-nh.org. The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.