Oral Hydration in Older Adults: Greater awareness is needed in preventing, recognizing, and treating dehydration.

Mentes, Janet PhD, APRN, BC

AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
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Abstract

OVERVIEW: Maintaining adequate fluid balance is an essential component of health at every stage of life. Age-related changes make older adults more vulnerable to shifts in water balance that can result in overhydration or, more frequently, dehydration. This article reviews age-related changes, risk factors, assessment measures, and nursing interventions for dehydration.

In Brief

Maintaining adequate fluid balance is an essential component of health at every stage of life.

Author Information

Janet Mentes is an assistant professor at the University of California–Los Angeles School of Nursing. Contact author: jmentes@sonnet.ucla.edu. This article is 12th in a series that’s supported in part by a grant from the Atlantic Philanthropies to the Gerontological Society of America. Nancy A. Stotts, EdD, RN, FAAN (nancy.stotts@nursing.ucsf.edu), a John A. Hartford scholar, and Carole E. Deitrich, MS, GNP, RN (carole.deitrich@nursing.ucsf.edu), are the series editors. The author of this article has no significant ties, financial or otherwise, to any company that might have an interest in the publication of this educational activity.

*The details of this case have been altered to ensure anonymity.

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