You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Readiness of U.S. Nurses for Evidence-Based Practice: Many dont understand or value research and have had little or no training to help them find evidence on which to base their practice.

Pravikoff, Diane S. PhD, RN, FAAN; Tanner, Annelle B. EdD, RN; Pierce, Susan T. EdD, RN

AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
Features: Original Research
Abstract

OVERVIEW: Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to problem solving for health care providers, including RNs, characterized by the use of the best evidence currently available for clinical decision making, in order to provide the most consistent and best possible care to patients. Are RNs in the United States prepared to engage in this process? This study examines nurses’ perceptions of their access to tools with which to obtain evidence and whether they have the skills to do so. Using a stratified random sample of 3,000 RNs across the United States, 1,097 nurses (37%) responded to the 93-item questionnaire. Seven hundred sixty respondents (77% of those who were employed at the time of the survey) worked in clinical settings and are the focus of this article. Although these nurses acknowledge that they frequently need information for practice, they feel much more confident asking colleagues or peers and searching the Internet and World Wide Web than they do using bibliographic databases such as PubMed or CINAHL to find specific information. They don’t understand or value research and have received little or no training in the use of tools that would help them find evidence on which to base their practice. Implications for nursing and nursing education are discussed.

In Brief

Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to problem solving for health care providers, including RNs. But are RNs in the United States prepared to engage in this process? This study finds that they are not.

Author Information

Diane S. Pravikoff is managing editor of the Online Journal of Clinical Innovations and director of research and professional liaison at Cinahl Information Systems in Glendale, CA. Annelle B. Tanner is regional coordinator of the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Initiative, Louisiana Office of Public Health, and an adjunct faculty member at Northwestern State University College of Nursing, Alexandria, LA. Susan T. Pierce is an associate professor at Northwestern State University College of Nursing’s main campus, Shreveport, LA. Contact author, Diane S. Pravikoff: dpravikoff@cinahl.com. The authors wish to acknowledge several organizations that contributed financially to the study: the Expert Panel on Nursing Informatics of the American Academy of Nursing; the American Medical Informatics Association’s Nursing Informatics Working Group; Cinahl Information Systems (a division of EBSCO Publishing); the Interagency Council on Information Resources for Nursing; McKesson Corporation; and Skyscape, Inc. The authors of this article have no other ties, financial or otherwise, to any company that might have an interest in the publication of this educational activity.

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.