AIDS

Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 24, 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 13 > Relationship of physical function and quality of life among...
AIDS:
doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000384
Clinical Science: Concise Communication

Relationship of physical function and quality of life among persons aging with HIV infection

Erlandson, Kristine M.; Allshouse, Amanda A.; Jankowski, Catherine M.; Mawhinney, Samantha; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Campbell, Thomas B.

Supplemental Author Material
Collapse Box

Abstract

Objective: Physical function impairments are seen among aging, HIV-infected persons on effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). The impact of physical function impairments on health-related quality of life (QoL) during ART is unknown.

Design: This was a cross-sectional study including 359 HIV-infected patients, aged 45–65 years, on ART for more than 6 months.

Methods: Patients completed the SF-36 QoL questionnaire, 400-m walk, 5-time chair rise, and grip strength. HIV-associated mortality risk was calculated using the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index. Physical function, physical activity (>500 versus ≤500 kcal/week), and VACS scores were used to estimate QoL in multivariable linear regression.

Results: For every 1 m/s increase in gait speed, we saw an estimated 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4, 15.2] point increase in the physical function scale with smaller differences across all subscales. For every 1 rise/s faster chair rise pace, we saw an estimated 16.0 (95% CI 9.1, 22.9) point increase in the physical function scale with smaller differences across all subscales. SF-36 scores were between 2.8 and 5.7 points higher among more physically active compared to less active patients. A 1 kg increase in grip strength was associated with a 0.2 (95% CI 0.01, 0.3) higher mental health score, but there were no differences in other subscales. VACS scores did not improve the model.

Conclusions: Faster gait speed and chair rise time, and greater physical activity were associated with greater QoL, independent of HIV-related mortality risk. Targeted exercise programs to increase physical activity and improve speed and power should be evaluated as interventions to improve QoL during ART.

© 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login

Article Tools

Share

Article Level Metrics

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.