AIDS

Skip Navigation LinksHome > January 2, 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 > Postpartum weight change among HIV-infected mothers by antir...
AIDS:
doi: 10.1097/01.aids.0000433243.24481.c3
Epidemiology and Social

Postpartum weight change among HIV-infected mothers by antiretroviral prophylaxis and infant feeding modality in a research setting

Cames, Cecilea; Cournil, Amandinea; de Vincenzi, Isabelleb; Gaillard, Philippeb; Meda, Nicolasc; Luchters, Stanleyd,e,f; Nduati, Ruthg; Naidu, Kevindrah; Newell, Marie-Louiseh; Read, Jennifer S.i,j; Bork, Kirstena; for the Kesho Bora Study Group

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Abstract

Objective: To assess the relationship between infant feeding, triple-antiretroviral prophylaxis and weight from 2 weeks (baseline) to 6 months postpartum among HIV-infected mothers in a mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-prevention trial in five sub-Saharan African sites.

Methods: HIV-infected pregnant women with CD4+ cell counts of 200–500 cells/μl were counselled to choose breastfeeding to 6 months or replacement feeding from delivery. They were randomized to receive perinatal zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine or triple-antiretroviral MTCT prophylaxis until breastfeeding cessation. Mixed-effect linear models were used to compare maternal weight trajectories over time by infant feeding mode. Antiretroviral prophylaxis and BMI at baseline were examined as potential effect modifiers.

Results: Among 797 mothers, 620 (78%) initiated breastfeeding. Wasting (BMI <18.5) was rare at baseline (2%), whereas overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25) was common (40%). In the model including all women, breastfeeding was not associated with weight loss up to 6 months, irrespective of baseline BMI and antiretroviral prophylaxis. Triple-antiretroviral prophylaxis was associated with weight gain among replacement-feeding mothers with baseline BMI at least 25 (+0.54 kg/month; P < 0.0001). In the model including breastfeeding mothers only, triple-antiretroviral prophylaxis was associated with weight gain among mothers with baseline BMI at least 25 who ceased breastfeeding before 3 months postpartum (+0.33 kg/month; P = 0.03).

Conclusion: The results suggest that breastfeeding up to 6 months postpartum is not detrimental for postpartum weight among well nourished HIV-infected mothers at intermediate-disease stage. In the absence of breastfeeding or after weaning, triple-antiretroviral prophylaxis is associated with weight gain among women with high BMI, even after cessation of prophylaxis.

© 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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