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Lower arterial stiffness and Framingham score after switching abacavir to tenofovir in men at high cardiovascular risk

Sinn, Kate; Richardson, Robyn; Carr, Andrew

doi: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e32833d568f
Research Letters

Abacavir's effect on cardiovascular function has not been studied prospectively. We measured augmentation index (a measure of arterial stiffness) in 20 men who switched from abacavir to tenofovir. After 4 weeks, mean augmentation index reduced from 22% by 4% (P = 0.03) and Framingham risk score by 2% (P = 0.01), which was driven by lower total cholesterol (0.8 mmol/l; P = 0.002). Consistent trends were observed through week 24. Changes in C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and D-dimer were inconsistent and only occurred from week 12. Abacavir may impair cardiovascular function by increasing total cholesterol levels.

HIV, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Unit, and Clinical Research Program, Centre for Applied Medical Research, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Received 31 May, 2010

Revised 16 June, 2010

Accepted 17 June, 2010

Correspondence to Professor Andrew Carr, HIV, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Unit, and Clinical Research Program, Centre for Applied Medical Research, St Vincent's Hospital, Level 4 Xavier Building, 390 Victoria Street, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia. Tel: +61 2 8382 3359; e-mail: acarr@stvincents.com.au

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.