Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions

Ebola Virus Disease

Much ado has been going on in the news and public conversation about "Ebola," and many are concerned and frightened. Here are some authoritative links to use. 

WHO Fact Sheet: Ebola Virus Disease 

CDC: Ebola Virus Disease [Index Page] Many topics. 

Identify, Isolate, Inform: Emergency Department Evaluation and Management for Patients Who Present with Possible Ebola Virus Disease 

Poster: Health Care Workers; Could it be Ebola? 

Poster: Ebola; What’s the diffence between infections spread through the air or by droplets? 

CDC: Guidance for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

CDC: Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) for Management of Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States

Wikipedia article: Ebola Virus Disease

PBS Newshour: This is how you get Ebola, as explained by science

AAAS: Science Magazine; Special Collection: The Ebola Epidemic 

Whitehouse.gov: FACT SHEET: U.S. Response to the Ebola Epidemic in West Africa

 

             Sincerely,

                  Tom Trimble, RN CEN

                   All opinions are solely those of the authorAdvanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

Current Issue Highlights

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Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

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Clinical Tips from AENJ

#75 What did you eat today?

In the fast-paced ED, we try to avoid the mundane and banal in the patient’s life; yet, sometimes therein lies the essential clue. Consider …

  • The hypoglycemic patient who had taken insulin but skipped breakfast.
  • Planning RSI airway management in a full-stomach patient.
  • The unexplained hyperkalemia in a well person who has spent three days consuming jars of guacamole and salsa from the big-box store.
  • The youthful hiker with ascending paralysis who paused to eat a pale wild carrot and learned what happened to Socrates.
  • The newly immigrated family who foraged for mushrooms and became ill when they found Amanita phalloides.
  • The CHF’er or Cholecystitis patient who you will probably see at Thanksgiving.
  • The Trichinosis victims who had hunted and eaten bear meat (that was undercooked).
  • The seafood-eating tourist who comes down with scombroid or ciguatera poisoning.
  • Considering food-borne Botulism in the differential diagnosis of weakness, diplopia, and ptosis.
  • Gastrointestinal illness with fecal-oral transmission. [The Four “F”s: food, fingers, feces, flies.]

Painting: "Death of Socrates" by Jacques-Louis David
"Death of Socrates" by Jacques-Louis David

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips #34 -(>)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
 Contact us with information upon conferences of interest to the readership.
 
 
Quick Poll

We never know when or where (outside of work) that we'll confront a moment of crisis and decision.
 

The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
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Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.