Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions
Forensic and Legal Medicine: 

No longer pathological, medical, or police procedural arcana, the popularity of shows such as CSI, Forensic Files, which proliferate in entertainment broadcasting; the infamy of  trials such as OJ Simpson, or Manson, or the assassination of JFK; have reached the highest peak since Sherlock Holmes, the world’s first Consulting Detective. 

As so many of our patients come from assaults, their occupational injuries and exposures, or accidents that interplay with law and liability, there is a natural interaction of emergency care and the world of forensic and legal medicine. Our observations and documentation may solve a crime, determine the order of inheritance, and either preserve or bungle evidentiary matters. 

It is worthwhile to learn something of these matters as it may better inform our examination and treatment of patients by the understanding of the specific pathophysiology encountered, enhance our clinical suspicion, and make our findings more scientific and socially useful. 

Here is a smattering of resources with which to start. 

Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine An International journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine 

What is legal medicine--are legal and forensic medicine the same?
J Forensic Leg Med. 2010 Apr;17(2):137-9. doi: 10.1016/j.hfkn,2009.09.011. Epub 2009 Nov 20.

The American Journal of Forensic Medicine And Pathology

Free medical journals: Legal medicine, forensic science

Forensic Medicine In Europe—Legal Medicine In America
Landé, K. E. (1936). Forensic Medicine in Europe—Legal Medicine in America. New England Journal of Medicine, 215(18), 826-834.

University of Minnesota Libraries: Selected Resources for Forensic Science

Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

Top 25 Forensic Science Journals and Publications from Forensic Science Technician Blog

International Journal of Forensic Science & Pathology (IJFP) an open-access journal

Cause of Death, Mechanism of Death, Manner of Death

             Sincerely,

                  Tom Trimble, RN CEN

                   All opinions are solely those of the authorAdvanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

Current Issue Highlights

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Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

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Clinical Tips from AENJ
#74 Critical Activities 

Typically, Registration provides one wrist band and many bar-code labels. Often, during active resuscitation, the band is sacrificed when in the way of a procedure; now comes the call from CT/IR/OR, until wristbands are ready, slap a bar-code sticker on the forehead where it can’t be missed, or accessible ankles. It is critical for the  patient to be labeled. 

As the patient leaves, consider having bilateral wrist bands to facilitate “Time Out” in those areas with different lay-out and access to the patient: e.g., Stroke Lab on the left, Cardiac Cath on the right, O.R. contralateral to operative site. Consider PIV site placement similarly. 

Prolonged Resuscitation coming in from the Field? Blunt Trauma Arrest? Odds, are, well … Consider placing the body bag before arrival (a sheet can conceal). This does not show lack of intent to resuscitate, nor conceding defeat before arrival, but, a practical protection of everyone’s back, confining of forensic debris, containment of liquids, etc. The strength of it may also aid in lateral transfers.

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips #34 -(>)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)
 

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
Inaugural AAENP MeetingThe American Academy of Emergency Nursing (AAENP)
Chicago Downtown Hilton Hotel
Chicago, Illinois
Saturday, October 25th, 2014
For further details see the AAENP website
 
 
Quick Poll

We never know when or where (outside of work) that we'll confront a moment of crisis and decision.
 

The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
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Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.