Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions

 We are pleased to see the award presented to Martin Bromiley by the Difficult Airway Society, who experienced personal tragedy, and using his background skills from the air industry, forgiving those responsible for his wife’s death during failed intubation (retold by the video “Just A Routine Operation”), led the way to examining and teaching the critical role of “Human Factors” research in medical catastrophes. We, too, have been moved by his experience and believe that the work resulting from his efforts needs to be incorporated within emergency care.

The video, “Just A Routine Operation,” should be seen by everyone who participates in airway management.
It is available from many sources and in different resolutions on the web [just search for the title].

 

             Sincerely,

                  Tom Trimble, RN CEN

                   All opinions are solely those of the author

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

Current Issue Highlights

Actions
View
Actions
View

 

Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

Advanced Emergency Nursing Blog
Login

Clinical Tips from AENJ

# 79 The Name Game (Bonana fana) 

Medical eponyms are a fascinating study, giving savor and appreciation to history, often a convenient nickname for a complex diagnostic description, and a fecund source of pimping material for juniors. 

When parent’s bring in their child, naming a rare eponym (which they expect me to know as well as the erudite sub-specialist they seek), I’ve resorted to Eponyms by Ossus GmbH on my phone to quickly clarify the definition. A delightful website that I’ve used for background reference and impromptu teaching is WhoNamedIt.com. 

Oh, and don’t wait for the results to come back on Cloquet’s Needle Test before acting. 

Occupational Medicine variations: 

Sherlock Holmes, and his real-life model: Dr.Joseph Bell of Edinburgh, could discern occupation by observation of typical injuries or “callosities” –probably more difficult now with fewer manual trades and greater life mobility. 

Why do hats have a little bow upon the inner hatband? In memory of the “Mad Hatters” who became so from felting with Mercury. 

Black Lung Disease or Coal Miner’s Lung. 

Chauffeur’s Fracture or Backfire Fracture is a Radial Styloid Fracture as in crank-started automobiles. 

Chimney Sweep's Carcinoma, or Soot wart, first recognized in 1775, became compensable with Bismarck’s reforms in the 1880s. 

“Jogger’s heel” = Plantar Fasciitis, not to be confused with “Policeman’s heel” = Plantar calcaneal bursitis. 

Nightstick Fracture” is the defense injury to the ulna of warding off blows with upraised arms. 

“Oyster Shucker’s Palm” is what I call the laceration resulting from inattentive or awkward use of an oyster knife by seafood workers. [Blog with recipe and tips 

Plumbism = Lead Poisoning, from plumbing with Lead Pipes (Pb).

Woolsorter’s Disease = anthrax.            

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips #34 -(>)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
 Contact us with information upon conferences of interest to the readership.
 
 
Quick Poll

We never know when or where (outside of work) that we'll confront a moment of crisis and decision.
 

The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
 Submit
 Clear
 Results
Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.