Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions

Neuromuscular Disease

Of late, there have been many “ALS Ice Bucket Challenges.” The events have produced an upwelling of contributions to a worthy cause. Seems like a good time to know neuromuscular diseases better.

Neuromuscular Disease Center | Washington University

Rehabilitation Management of Neuromuscular Disease |Emedicine Medscape

Journal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease

ALS Association [Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis]

Preparing for Emergencies: A Checklist for People with Neuromuscular Diseases | Muscular Dystrophy Association

Cirillo, Melissa L., MD Neuromuscular Emergencies Clin Ped Emerg Med 9:88-95

Gierke, Eric, M.D. Medical Director, General Neurology Swedish Neuroscience Institute Neuromuscular Emergencies Acute Care Neurology and Neurosurgery: From the ER to the OR to the NCCU [PPT] May 31, 2013

Richman, Elliot, PhD INTUBATE EARLY IN NEUROMUSCULAR RESPIRATORY FAILURE PulmonaryReviews.com (refererencing Ropper AH. Neuromuscular respiratory failure. Presented at: The Second Biennial New York Symposium on Neurologic Emergencies and Neurocritical Care; May 19, 2001; New York City.)

Mechanical Ventilation of the Patient with Neuromuscular Disease [PPT] Dean Hess PhD RRT Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School Assistant Director of Respiratory Care, Massachusetts General Hospital Editor in Chief, Respiratory Care

Treating Neuromuscular Patients Who Use Home Ventilation: Critical Issues International Ventilator Users Network

Surveillance and Referral Aid for Primary Care Providers  Early Diagnosis Makes A Difference: Learn the steps to identify pediatric muscle weakness and signs of neuromuscular disease. National Task Force for Early Identification of Childhood Neuromuscular Disorders.

Neurologic Emergencies ER [PPT]  3023-2013 Clerkship Ninith Kartha, M.D. Stritch School of Medicine Loyola University, Chicago

Kramer, C. L., Wijdicks, E. F., & Rabinstein, A. A. (2013). Acute Neuromuscular Disorders. [PDF]  © 2013 Neurocritical Care Society Practice Update 

 

            Sincerely,

 

                        Tom Trimble, RN CEN 

                        All opinions are those of the author.

                        Readers assume responsibility for verifying accuracy
                        and validity of link content for their own practice.

 

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

Current Issue Highlights

Actions
View
Actions
View

LWW iPad journals users: Not all titles are currently compatible with iOS8. Please see the list of iOS8 compatible titles before updating your iPad to iO8. List updated daily.

 

Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

Advanced Emergency Nursing Blog
Login

Clinical Tips from AENJ

#70 What’s in your trunk?

The prudent emergency person who sets out upon a journey knows that nothing is guaranteed, and being self-reliant brings supplies and provisions for unexpected necessity.

For many people, “a first aid kit in the car” is a plastic box with band-aids® and aspirin. In the dark, bad weather, overturned, or at the roadside, you may need more, in addition to your trauma supplies.

See what you’re doing: Consider head-mounted lights for hands-free work, or a set-down lantern; a long distance flashlight is good to check for ejectees or nearby help.

Be seen/don’t be hurt: a safety vest, light colored clothing (and never turn your back on traffic) is good. Clothing appropriate to weather (not the car’s heater/AC). Nitrile gloves for patient contact. Leather work gloves, safety glasses. A window-breaking, seat belt cutter tool may be useful.

Advance warning: Safety triangles don’t have dead batteries, or start fires. A, magnetic base lets you place it on your rooftop for longer visibility, Use two sets, and place them far out to slow traffic (1 car-length for each 10 mph of speed; and before blind bends/summits. Flares/Fusees are great (night & fog), but can ignite gasoline or dry brush. Flashing LED lights alert well.

Shelter/Casualty care: Sturdy tarpaulin as a working surface; shade; rain protection; safely drag casualty to safety; and prevent blankets from soaking. Disposable blankets.

Rural areas: Cell phone; signaling devices; water and food (not chips). “Flight Plan” with family: “If you don’t hear from me by __, call for help. I’ll be on route 29 and will call any changes to you.” If stranded, "I'll try calling every even hour for 5 minutes (to save battery)."

 

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips #34 ->)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)

 

 

 

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
October 2nd - 5th, 2014
Naples, Florida
Waldorf Astoria
 
ENA Annual Conference
October 7th - 11th, 2014
Indianapolis, Indiana
Indiana Convention Center
 
 
Quick Poll

We never know when or where (outside of work) that we'll confront a moment of crisis and decision.
 

The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
 Submit
 Clear
 Results
Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.