Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions

 My Personal Potpourri 

To efficiently keep track of medical advances and current work in one’s specialty fields isn’t easy. Here are some resources of exceptional utility that I use most frequently. 

Amedeo is a free, but excellent, bibliographic tracking service that sends weekly emails with links to relevant abstracts from journal lists that you may customize. It is supported by an educational grant, so there is no cost. Reviewing Amedeo’s website is not to be missed. 

PubMedCentral is an NIH repository of content received from publishers, authors, or under public-access policy of NIH-funded projects; and will provide free email updates and links to free articles within it. Copyright may be retained, so check the notice on the record. Wikipedia explains that whereas, PubMed search results link to articles stored elsewhere that may or may not be free, PubMedCentral stores articles that are free access, although there may be an initial embargo period by the publisher. 

BioMedCentral is a commercial open publisher in biomedical fields that provides open access to peer-reviewed content. BMC will email free updates with links to the free articles. 

“eTOC”s from journal publishers, usually subscribable at the publisher’s or journal’s website, are electronic tables of contents that can be sent to you to inform you of publication, pre-publication, and links. 

If speed of information is important to you, you may notice that different notification services may vary by days or weeks from each other depending on their indexing process or your personal settings. This will probably be quickest.  

Free Emergency Medicine Talks, curated by Joe Lex, MD, is a vast collection of lectures, and presentations, that are available worldwide. You will be amazed and gratified. 

YouTube and Vimeo are sources of videos. Or, enter your topic or presenter into a search engine with the specification of filetype: mp3, ppt, flv, etc. and your returns will be in that format.

 

            Sincerely,

 

                        Tom Trimble, RN CEN 

                        All opinions are those of the author.

                        Readers assume responsibility for verifying accuracy
                        and validity of link content for their own practice.

 

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

Current Issue Highlights

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Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

Advanced Emergency Nursing Blog
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Clinical Tips from AENJ

#65 Eyes in the back of the Tester’s head

Have you noticed how often Snellen chart testing is inadequately done? The victim is left at the twenty foot line unobserved supposedly covering the eye with a hand, while the tester stands at the chart pointing like a schoolteacher and reading the answer.

Why do people cheat? Perhaps, a wish to “do well,” or fear of loss of driving privilege, or to create a bogus claim.

The skillful tester stands with and facing the patient covering an eye with a card; staying the distance; recalling the most frequently used lines; requesting backwards reading to ward off guilty memorization (or use a children’s chart or “illiterate E” chart). Discard the card or clean the occlusor afterwards. Have a pinhole aperture available or punch the card with a needle if the patient’s glasses are missing.

Watch the subject, not the chart.

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips (#34 ->)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)

 

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
October 2nd - 5th, 2014
Naples, Florida
Waldorf Astoria
 
ENA Annual Conference
October 7th - 11th, 2014
Indianapolis, Indiana
Indiana Convention Center
 
 
Quick Poll

We never know when or where (outside of work) that we'll confront a moment of crisis and decision.
 

The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
The Classic "What If" Question: You are at a restaurant, and a fellow diner inescapably needs a cricothyrotomy. EMS isn't there, and isn't authorized to do one. Will you do a cricothyrotomy? NOW?
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Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.