Editor-in-Chief: K. Sue Hoyt, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, FAEN, FAANP, FAAN
Jean A. Proehl, RN, MN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
ISSN: 1931-4485
Online ISSN: 1931-4493
Frequency: 4 issues / year
Editors' Remarks

  Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

 Editor Jean A. Proehl

 Editor Karen Sue Hoyt

 

Editor Jean A. Proehl 

Editors' Remarks

   

Dear Colleague,

The Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (AENJ) has a newly enhanced online presence! This creates new possibilities for connecting, networking, and discovering information about advanced practice emergency nursing.   In addition to Current Edition Highlights previously provided, we have added the following sections:

·       Online Editor's Suggestions

·       Most Popular

·       Guidelines and Scientific Statements

·       Upcoming Conferences

·       Quick Poll

You can even follow us on Twitter via a link on the page J.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce Tom Trimble, our Online Editor.  Tom was an internet pioneer in emergency nursing having established "Emergency Nursing World !" [http://ENW.org] on July 4, 1996 and the very first emergency nursing discussion list (Em-Nsg-L: The Emergency Nursing List).  He is helping us establish and expand our cyber-presence and we are fortunate to have him on our team.

Now, we would like to hear from you. Do you have suggestions for things you would find useful online? Please let us know and send us any new resources or helpful links you would like added to this site.

Sue and Jean

Online Editor's Suggestions
Ever look around you in a public place and wonder "Where's the AED?" A fascinating student project in The Netherlands may, with great potential and speediness, solve that problem with an application of "drone" technology: "The Ambulance Drone."

I'm still waiting for a cheap "Dick Tracy Two-Way Wrist Radio." This is far better. 

ACEP reports data released by CDC that "ER Visits at Record High, 96 Percent Needed Medical Care within 2 Hours."  

"The nation's emergency departments saw more than 136 million patient visits in 2011, the highest number ever recorded, compared with 129.8 million in 2010, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The percentage of patients with nonurgent medical conditions dropped by half — an overwhelming 96 percent were triaged as needing medical treatment within 2 hours, up from 92 percent in 2010. The nation's emergency departments saw more than 136 million patient visits in 2011, the highest number ever recorded, compared with 129.8 million in 2010, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The percentage of patients with nonurgent medical conditions dropped by half — an overwhelming 96 percent were triaged as needing medical treatment within 2 hours, up from 92 percent in 2010." 

So, fewer nonurgent patients, but more visits, more patients who are sicker, three-quarters of hospitals boarding patients in the ED, long waits for that upstairs bed … WOW, I'm glad they reported this —it sure felt like it!

[More on "Trends in Emergency Department Visits, 2006–2011" from Healthcare Cost & Utilization Project of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.]

The Atlantic has a column on "The Toys That Send Kids To The Emergency Room." 

Joseph Kennedy (@JoeKennedyEM) posts a nice column on "Pearls in Digital Wound Repair" in the EMBLOG Mayo Clinic.

Bob Stuntz, MD, RDMS, has a nice description on "Developing the EM Mindset" at the emDocs blog. For a different viewpoint, see Javier Benitez, MD's "Darth Vader in the ED" from ACEPnow, which also has "ER Jingle Bells" by Robert Brandt, M.D.

             Sincerely,

                  Tom Trimble, RN CEN

                   All opinions are solely those of the author.Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is always looking for authors, articles, and suggestions for topics that inform the work of our specialty and excite the readers. If you have an article or concept to propose, or suggestions and opinions that would help us meet your needs, please use our "Feedback" form to contact the Editors. It's a direct line of communication, and the free registration of your email allows us to respond to your suggestions, and makes the entire website and all other LWW Journals more useable and functional for you.

 

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Are you a Clinical Nurse Specialist?

If so, we need you to stand up and be counted!

The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) has partnered with other nursing organizations to fill the gap left by the retirement of HRSA’s national nurse survey. If you are a graduate of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program, we want to hear from and count you. Please complete our national survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CF56ZXM and share it with your CNS colleagues.

The survey is open until December 31, 2014 to all nurses who identify themselves as or who were educated CNSs.

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Clinical Tips from AENJ

 # 82 Hands on; Hands in 

For an intellectual occupation, our use of hands still define who we are, our relationships, what we do, and the satisfaction therefrom derived. 

Far too many patients have become accustomed to the "professional" handshake: the limp-fish palm touch, or the too crisp and brief handshake while moving inwards to the room. Especially with the apprehensive, withdrawn, or very ill, linger the firm grasp a bit more, while directly engaging: "How may I help you?" or "I'm here to help." 

We derive internal satisfaction from the manual task that is well-performed; but sometimes, the hands are the best way to do the job: e.g., the Triple Airway Maneuver; the tension pneumothorax deflated, the deftly swift cricothyrotomy that averts catastrophe. 

The Triple Airway Maneuver is the best uninstrumented immediate method of opening the collapsed or obstructed airway. 

Most cannulae are too short, or likely to kink, or poorly inserted to relieve tension pneumothorax reliably, and less certain of perforating pleura without perforating lung. 

Cricothyrotomy is most swiftly done with fewest tools and less likelihood of dangerous non-endotracheal placement of the tube when one uses "Scalpel, Finger, Bougie" to ID and railroad the trachea. 

Give these authors, and your patients, a hand!

 

Defalque, R. J., & Wright, A. J. (2003). Who invented the “jaw thrust”?. Anesthesiology, 99(6), 1463-1464.
Isono, S. (2008). One hand, two hands, or no hands for maximizing airway maneuvers?. Anesthesiology, 109(4), 576-577.
Heard, A.M.B  Scalpel Bougie [CICO Airway Management - Percutaneous Emergency Oxygentation Techniques] youtube.com Dec 16, 2013
Weingart, S. Podcast 053 – Needle vs. Knife: Part I  Needle or the Knife for the Cricothyrotomy
EMCrit Blog
Reid, C. "Open thoracostomy" RESUS.ME Blog January 22, 2011
McGonigal, M MD. Why I Don’t Like Finger Thoracostomy "The Trauma Professional's Blog"
Weingart, S.
Podcast 62 – Needle vs. Knife II: Needle Thoracostomy? EMCrit Blog 2011
Nickson, C. Finger Thoracostomy "Life In the Fastlane Blog
Karrer, A. LP et al. Simple Thoracostomy: Moving Beyond Needle Decompression in Traumatic Cardiac Arrest JEMS April 2014.
"Frank F."
Finger Thoracostomy Video Vimeo.com 2014.
Brohi, K.
"simple thoracostomy = NO needles (just a finger)" Trauma List Archive. 2004.
"Finger Thoracostomy" "Taming the SRU - Emergency Medicine Tamed" Blo
g March 01, 2014.

Click to download 2014's Collected Tips #34 -(>)
Click to download 2013's Collected Tips (#1 - #33)

Guidelines & Scientific Statements
Upcoming Conferences
 Contact us with information upon conferences of interest to the readership.
 
 
Author Alert!

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal is seeking authors, articles, and topics. If you are interested in writing for publication, please check our newest (9-2013)"Topics of Interest" for your project. Please contact our Editors if you have an additional proposal or suggestion.