Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Understanding Inequalities in Access to Health Care Services for Aboriginal People: A Call for Nursing Action

Cameron, Brenda L. PhD, RN; Carmargo Plazas, Maria del Pilar PhD, RN; Salas, Anna Santos PhD, RN; Bourque Bearskin, R. Lisa MN, RN; Hungler, Krista MSc

doi: 10.1097/ANS.0000000000000039
Original Articles

We present findings from an Access Research Initiative to reduce health disparities and promote equitable access with Aboriginal peoples in Canada. We employed Indigenous, interpretive, and participatory research methodologies in partnership with Aboriginal people. Participants reported stories of bullying, fear, intimidation, and lack of cultural understanding. This research reveals the urgent need to enhance the delivery of culturally appropriate practices in emergency. As nurses, if we wish to affect equity of access, then attention is required to structural injustices that act as barriers to access such as addressing the stigma, stereotyping, and discrimination experienced by Aboriginal people in this study.

Findings from an Access Research Initiative to reduce health disparities and promote equitable access with Aboriginal peoples in Canada reveal the urgent need to enhance the delivery of culturally appropriate practices in emergency contexts. Achieving equity of access demands attention to structural barriers experienced by Aboriginal people in this study, such as stigma, stereotyping, and discrimination. www.advancesinnursingscience.com

Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (Mss Cameron, Salas, Bearskinand and Hungler and Dr Plazas).

Correspondence: Brenda L. Cameron, PhD, RN, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 3rd Floor Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, University of Alberta, 11405 87 Ave, Edmonton Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada (brenda.cameron@ualberta.ca).

Since 2002, this access research initiative has been led by eminent scholar Elder Rose Martial, who has been the head, heart, spirit, and inspiration for 8 years of investigation. We lack words to express our deepest and sincerest gratitude to our research participants who gave of their time and experience. This intervention was funded by CIHR/IGH Reducing Health Disparities initiative. This article is a cumulative work of a 6-year investigation and would not have been possible without our CHR Sarah Doust.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

© 2014Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins