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Exploring the Concept of Resuscitability in an Adult Trauma Population

Zeitzer, Mindy B. MSN, CRNP

Advances in Nursing Science:
doi: 10.1097/01.ANS.0000319569.91631.d1
Article Available Online Only for the April-June Issue
Abstract

Resuscitability is a concept often used during the resuscitation of injured patients but remains unnamed, unexplored, and undefined. This article explores resuscitability as it pertains to nurses caring for adult trauma patients for the purposes of concept development. After a review of the literature, dimensions discovered include physiologic, legal, ethical, and societal. Development of the concept of resuscitability can be used to address issues related to trauma resuscitations. Trauma nurses care for severely injured patients on each of the dimensional levels identified and thus understanding the meaning of resuscitability will help nurses better care for their injured patients.

In Brief

This article explores resuscitability as it pertains to nurses caring for adult trauma patients for the purposes of concept development. Dimensions discovered include physiologic, legal, ethical, and societal. Trauma nurses care for severely injured patients on each of the dimensional levels identified; understanding the meaning of resuscitability will help nurses better care for their injured patients.

Author Information

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing & Center for Bioethics, Philadelphia.

Corresponding Author: Mindy B. Zeitzer, MSN, CRNP, Claire M. Fagin Hall, 418 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (mindyz@nursing.upenn.edu).

The author thanks Dr Connie Ulrich for her guidance and support and Drs Therese Richmond and Barbara Riegel for their thoughtful comments in the development of this article. This article was developed with financial support by grant F31NR010432 from the National Institute of Nursing Research. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Nursing Research or the National Institutes of Health.

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.