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The Importance of Organizational Climate to Training Needs and Outcomes in Long-term Care

CORAZZINI, KIRSTEN N. PHD; MCCONNELL, ELEANOR S. PHD, RN, APRN, GCNS, BC; ANDERSON, RUTH A. PHD, RN, FAAN; REED, DAVID PHD; CHAMPAGNE, MARY T. PHD, RN, FAAN; LEKAN, DEBORAH RN, MSN; PREISSER, JOHN S. PHD; BAILEY, DONALD PHD, RN; ZIMMERMAN, SHERYL PHD

doi: 10.1097/ACQ.0b013e3181dbc070
FEATURE TOPIC: Dementia Care Training in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Settings, Part 2: Research

Efforts to improve dementia care through training occur in an organizational context that may enhance or inhibit improvement. This article used linear mixed models to examine the relationship of contextual and organizational factors to baseline knowledge, work stress, and training outcomes of a dementia care training program. Data from staff (N = 678) in 16 long-term care settings indicate that such factors related to both baseline training needs and training effects over time. On the basis of these findings, long-term care administrators are advised to consider the administrative climate, communication patterns, and the perceived need for training before implementing a training program.

Kirsten N. Corazzini, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Nursing; and Senior Fellow, Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Durham, North Carolina.

Eleanor S. McConnell, PhD, RN, APRN, GCNS, BC, is Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing; Clinical Nurse Researcher, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center; and Senior Fellow, Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Durham, North Carolina.

Ruth A. Anderson, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Professor and Senior Fellow, Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Durham, North Carolina.

David Reed, PhD, is a Senior Analyst, Program on Aging, Disability, and Long-Term Care, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Mary T. Champagne, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Laurel Chadwick Distinguished Professor, Duke University School of Nursing; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development; and Professor of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Deborah Lekan, RN, MSN, is Clinical Associate, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

John S. Preisser, PhD, is Research Professor of Biostatistics, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health; and Fellow, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Donald Bailey, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development; and Claire M. Fagin Fellow, Durham, North Carolina.

Sheryl Zimmerman, PhD, is Kenan Distinguished Professor and Director of Aging Research, School of Social Work; Adjunct Distinguished Professor, School of Public Health; and Co-Director, Program on Aging, Disability, and Long-Term Care, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Address correspondence to: Kirsten N. Corazzini, PhD, Duke University School of Nursing, Box 3322 DUMC, 307 Trent Dr, Durham, NC 27710 (coraz001@mc.duke.edu).

This research was supported by grants from the Duke University Trajectories of Aging and Care in Nursing Science Center (NIH 1 P20-NR07795-01), the University of Iowa Geriatric Nursing Interventions Research Center (NIH: P30-NR03979), the University of Iowa John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, and the Alzheimer's Association Medical and Scientific Division (grant IIRG-05-14332).

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.