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Cranial Electrical Stimulation: Cranial Electrical Stimulation Potential Use in Reducing Sleep and Mood Disturbances in Persons With Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

ROSE, KAREN M. PHD, RN; TAYLOR, ANN GILL EDD, RN; BOURGUIGNON, FAANCHERYL PHD; UTZ, RNSHARON W. PHD; GOEHLER, RNLISA E. PHD

Alzheimer's Care Today:
doi: 10.1097/ACQ.0b013e3181a4115d
Best Practice
Abstract

Family caregivers of persons with dementia and their care recipients frequently experience sleep and mood disturbances throughout their caregiving and disease trajectories. Because conventional pharmacologic treatments of sleep and mood disturbances pose numerous risks and adverse effects to elderly persons, the investigation of other interventions is warranted. As older adults use complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the relief of sleep and mood disturbances, cranial electrical stimulation, an energy-based complementary and alternative medicine, may be a viable intervention. The proposed mechanism of action and studies that support cranial electrical stimulation as a modality to reduce distressing symptoms are reviewed. Directions for research are proposed.

Author Information

Karen M. Rose, PhD, RN, is Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Ann Gill Taylor, EdD, RN, FAAN, is Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, and Director of the Center for the Study of Complementary & Alternative Therapies, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Cheryl Bourguignon, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, and Center for the Study of Complementary & Alternative Therapies, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Sharon W. Utz, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Lisa E. Goehler, PhD, Research Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Address correspondence to: Karen M. Rose, PhD, RN, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, PO Box 800905, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (kmr5q@virginia.edu).

This publication was supported in part by a scholarship provided by the John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Scholarship Program and by grant nos. 5-T32-AT000052 and 5-K30-AT000060 from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine or the National Institutes of Health.

Reprinted with permission from Rose KM, Taylor AG, Bourguignon C, Utz SW, Goehler LE. Cranial Electrical Stimulation: Potential Use in Reducing Sleep and Mood Disturbances in Persons With Dementia and Their Family Caregivers. Fam Community Health. 2008;31(3):240–246.

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.