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Effects of Pseudoephedrine on Maximal Cycling Power and Submaximal Cycling Efficiency

H. HODGES, ALASTAIR N.; LYNN, BRENNA M.; BULA, JONATHAN E.; DONALDSON, MEGHAN G.; DAGENAIS, MARC O.; MCKENZIE, DONALD C.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: August 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 8 - p 1316-1319
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000078925.30346.F8
BASIC SCIENCES: Original Investigations

HODGES, A. N. H., B. M. LYNN, J. E. BULA, M. G. DONALDSON, M. O. DAGENAIS, and D. C. MCKENZIE. Effects of Pseudoephedrine on Maximal Cycling Power and Submaximal Cycling Efficiency. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 35, No. 8, pp. 1316–1319, 2003.

Purpose To study the effects of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on anaerobic cycling power and aerobic cycling efficiency.

Methods Eleven healthy moderately trained males (V̇O2peak 4.4 ± 0.8 L·min−1) participated in a double-blinded crossover design. Subjects underwent baseline (B) tests for anaerobic (Wingate test) and aerobic (V̇O2peak test) cycling power. Subjects ingested either 60 mg of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (D) or a placebo (P) and, after 90 min of rest, a Wingate and a cycling efficiency test were performed. During the cycling efficiency test, heart rate (HR) and V̇O2 were averaged for the last 5 min of a 10-min cycle at 40% and 60% of the peak power achieved during the V̇O2peak test.

Results There were no significant differences in peak power (B = 860 ± 154, D = 926 ± 124, P = 908 ± 118 W), total work (B = 20 ± 3, D = 21 ± 3, P = 21 ± 3 kJ), or fatigue index (B = 39 ± 8, D = 45 ± 5, P = 43 ± 5%). There were no significant differences in HR at 40% power (D = 138 ± 10, P = 137 ± 10 beats·min−1) or 60% power (D = 161 ± 11, P = 160 ± 11 beats·min−1). There were no significant differences in cycling efficiency at 40% power (D = 18.8 ± 1.8, P = 18.5 ± 1.8%) or 60% power (D = 20.3 ± 2.0, P = 20.1 ± 2.1%).

Conclusion A therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride does not affect anaerobic cycling performance or aerobic cycling efficiency.

Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre and School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA

Address for correspondence: Donald C. McKenzie, Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre and School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, 3055 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z3, Canada; E-mail: kari@interchange.ubc.ca.

Submitted for publication April 2002.

Accepted for publication February 2003.

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine