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Noninvasive estimation of the maximal lactate steady state in trained cyclists

SWENSEN, THOMAS C.; HARNISH, CHRISTOPHER R.; BEITMAN, LAURA; KELLER, BETSY A.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 1999 - Volume 31 - Issue 5 - pp 742-746
Special Communications: Methods

Noninvasive estimation of the maximal lactate steady state in trained cyclists. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 5, pp. 742-746, 1999.

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to estimate noninvasively the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) in trained cyclists on a windload simulator with a velocity based technique and to determine whether the HR at MLSS (HRMLSS) elicited a similar blood lactate concentration (BLC) during field testing.

Methods: To determine and verify MLSS, 10 male cyclists performed five to seven laboratory trials on separate days, including a V̇O2max test; a 5-km time trial (TT); and two or more 30-min trials at specific percentages of each subject's average 5-km TT speed (AVS5km). Mean ± SD for the following variables were obtained at MLSS: velocity was 90.3 ± 2.7% of the AVS5km, BLC was 5.4 ± 1.6 mM, RPE was 15 ± 2.1, V̇O2 was 80 ± 6.3% of V̇O2max, and HR was 167 ± 9.5 beats·min−1, which was 88 ± 3.8% of the mean maximum HR. Field tests included three laps of an 8-km road circuit at HRMLSS ± 3 beats·min−1 and one lap at maximum sustainable velocity (a road TT).

Results: There were no significant differences in BLC, HR, and RPE between the three steady-state road laps and the lab MLSS trial. There was also good agreement between the road and lab MLSS velocity/TT velocity ratios.

Conclusions: Our data suggest that 5-km TT cycling velocity, as measured on a windload simulator, may be used to estimate MLSS and the HR at MLSS for training purposes.

Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850

Submitted for publication May 1997.

Accepted for publication January 1998.

The authors are deeply indebted to Al Kreitler, who generously donated the windload simulator used in this study.

This project was supported by a Small Grant for Faculty Research and a Summer Research Grant from Ithaca College.

Address for correspondence: Thomas Swensen, Ph.D., Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850. E-mail: tswensen@ithaca.edu.

© 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.