Home Current Issue Previous Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Collections For Authors Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > December 1989 - Volume 21 - Issue 6 > The frequency of anemia and iron deficiency in the runner
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
CLINICAL SCIENCES CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS: PDF Only

The frequency of anemia and iron deficiency in the runner

BALABAN, EDWARD P.; COX, JOHN V.; SNELL, PETER; VAUGHAN, ROBERT H.; FRENKEL, EUGENE P.

Collapse Box

Abstract

BALABAN, E. P., J. V. COX, P. SNELL, R. H. VAUGHAN, and E. P. FRENKEL. The frequency of anemia and iron deficiency in the runner. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 21, No. 6, pp. 643-648, 1989. The current consensus is that runners commonly experience a mild anemia influenced by iron deficiency. We compared hematologic parameters of 72 (35 males and 37 females) runners with 48 (27 males and 21 females) nonrunners and assessed the impact of iron supplementation. Male runners had lower hemoglobin (Hb) values than male nonrunners (14.8 vs 15.3 g +/- d1-1) (P < 0.05) regardless of iron usage. Female runners had higher (P = 0.05) Hb values than female controls (13.5 vs 12.8 g +/- d1-1). Female runners off iron had Hbs similar to controls off iron (P = 0.30). Iron parameters (total serum iron, TSI; total iron-binding capacity, TIBC; percent saturation of the TIBC, %sat TIBC; and serum ferritin) of runners vs controls, runners vs runners (on or off iron), and nonrunners vs nonrunners (on or off iron) were comparable except 1) male runners off iron had lower (P < 0.05) %sat TIBC values (26%) than male runners on iron (34%) and 2) female runners taking iron had ferritin values (32 ng +/- m1-1) similar to those of female nonrunners taking iron (39 ng +/- m1-1) but higher (P < 0.05) than their counterparts off iron (15 and 15 ng +/- m1-1, respectively). This study concludes that running affects Hb in a variable manner and suggests that the runner's iron status is similar to that of the general population.

(C)1989The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Connect With Us