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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402753.19053.98
C-14 Thematic Poster - Incident Disease and Mortality: JUNE 2, 2011 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM: ROOM: 403

Combined Impact of Lifestyle Factors on Cancer Mortality in Men: 621: Board #3 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Lee, Chong-Do FACSM1; Sui, Xuemei2; Hooker, Steven P. FACSM2; Hébert, James R.2; Blair, Steven N. FACSM2

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Author Information

1Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ. 2University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

Email: chong.lee@asu.edu

(No relationships reported)

The impact of lifestyle factors on cancer mortality in U.S. population has not been thoroughly explored.

PURPOSE: We examined the combined effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, never smoking, and normal waist girth on total cancer mortality in men.

METHODS: We followed a total of 24,741 men ages 20-82 years who participated in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. A low-risk profile was defined as never smoking, moderate or high fitness, and normal waist girth, and they were further categorized as having 0, 1, 2, or 3 combined low-risk factors.

RESULTS: During an average of 14.5 years of follow-up, there were a total of 384 cancer deaths. After adjustment for age, examination year, and multiple risk factors, men who were physically fit, never smoked, and had a normal waist girth had a 62% lower risk of total cancer mortality (95% confidence interval [CI], 45%-73%) compared with men with zero low-risk factors. Men with all 3 low-risk factors had a 12-year (95% CI: 8.6-14.6) longer life expectancy compared with men with 0 low-risk factors. Approximately 41% (95% CI, 17%-56%) of total cancer deaths might have been avoided if the men had maintained all three low-risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS: Being physically fit, never smoking, and maintaining a normal waist girth is associated with lower risk of total cancer mortality in men.

Supported by National Institutes of Health grants AG06945 and HL62508; National Cancer Institute K05 CA136975.

© 2011 American College of Sports Medicine

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