Skip Navigation LinksHome > May 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 > RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENT SKILLS, ENERGY EX...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
D-14L Free Communication/Poster Children and Exercise

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENT SKILLS, ENERGY EXPENDITURE, AND FITNESS, AMONG LEAN AND OVERWEIGHT CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Okely, A D.1; Booth, M L. FACSM1; Chey, T1

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1A.E. Bauman Faculty of Education and Metabolic Research Centre, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia

Among adults, being fit has been shown to offer more protection against cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality than being lean. With the prevalence of child and adolescent obesity high and escalating, and weight loss hard to maintain among obese children, it may be timely to focus on factors influencing fitness among obese children to most effectively reduce the short- and long-term consequences of child obesity. One potential factor may be the fundamental movement skills (FMS) that are used to participate in aerobic activities.

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PURPOSE

To examine the relationship of cardiorespiratory endurance (CRE) and activity energy expenditure (AEE) to FMS among lean and overweight/obese young people.

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METHODS

Cross-sectional survey of 2897 lean and 891overweight/obese boys and girls in Grades 4, 6, 8, and 10, randomly selected as part of the New South Wales Schools Fitness and Physical Activity Survey, 1997. CRE was assessed using the Multistage Fitness Test (PACER). Six FMS (run, jump, catch, throw, kick, and strike) were measured. Physical activity was assessed (Grade 8 and 10 only) using a self-report instrument where students reported their participation during a usual week in summer school terms.

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RESULTS

Multiple regression analysis (adjusted for age, rurality, SES, and cultural background) indicated that there was a significant positive trend for CRE and summer AEE as FMS increased for both lean and overweight/obese boys and girls. For both CRE and AEE, this trend was stronger for girls than boys.

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CONCLUSIONS

Among lean and overweight/obese boys and girls, FMS are significantly associated with CRE and AEE and should be considered in developing interventions and programs to promote fitness and physical activity among children and adolescents. NSW Department of Education and Training, the NSW Department of Health and the National Professional Development Program

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine

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