Skip Navigation LinksHome > May 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 > PROLIFERATON RATE REGULATION BY OSCILLATORY FLUID FLOW IN ST...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Bone and Aletered Mechanical Loading: Basic Science Approaches

PROLIFERATON RATE REGULATION BY OSCILLATORY FLUID FLOW IN STEM CELLS

You, L D.1; Li, Y J.1; Batra, N N.1; Jacobs, C R.1

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1Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Mechanical loading can regulate bone adaptation. Changes in bone could be induced by the changes in osteoblast number, which could be a result of changes in osteoprogenitor proliferation. When bone is mechanically loaded, bone cells will be exposed to the loading induced oscillatory fluid flow (OFF). How this OFF is related to the changes in bone is not well understood. One potential mechanism is that OFF can affect the changes in bone through changing the osteoprogentor activity.

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PURPOSE

To investigate the effects of OFF on marrow stromal cells (MSCs), which are the osteoprogenitors of osteoblasts.

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METHODS

MSCs were cultured on 0.01% poly-l-lysine coated glass slides at standard conditions of 5% CO2, 37°C and 95% humidity to subconfluent level (3 days). Cells were then subjected to 1Hz OFF at peak shear stress of 1 Pa for 2 hours. Cells cultured on slides at the same conditions with no flow served as control. These cells remained in the incubator while the flow groups were exposed to OFF. After 24 hours, cells were collected and cell proliferation were assessed by the incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU).

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RESULT

The fraction of cells proliferating in OFF group (26 +/− 2.7%) is significantly higer than cells in no flow group (17+/− 1.3%, p < 0.0005).

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CONCLUSION

Loading induced OFF upregulates osteoblasts number by increasing the proliferation rate of MSCs.

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine

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