Skip Navigation LinksHome > May 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 > PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO MOUNTAIN CLIMBING ASSESSED BY A S...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
D-14H Free Communication/Poster Altitude Effects/Hyperbaria

PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO MOUNTAIN CLIMBING ASSESSED BY A SMALL ELECTRONIC RECORDING DEVICE

Hashimoto, I FACSM1; Saito, M1; Iwamura, A1; Hara, M1

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1Institute of Human Living Sciences, Otsuma Women's University, Tokyo, Japan

(Sponsor: Isao Hashimoto, FACSM)

Recent development of a lightweight, portable, electronic device has made it possible to record and store physiological data in field settings in subjects undergoing strenuous exercise.

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PURPOSE

The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using the Mac Quarto Model, VM-064 (Vine Co., Ltd., Tokyo) to describe selected physiological responses to mountain climbing in young adult women.

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METHODS

Three healthy women, aged 21–22 y, volunteered to climb Mt. Fuji (3,776m) while having their physiological responses monitored electronically. Informed consent was obtained according to institutional guidelines. The electronic device was powered by 12 V batteries, and it's four-channels of memory recorded the following data each minute: heart rate (HR), ventilatory volume (VV), oxygen concentration in the expired gas (ogc), and body temperature (BT).

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RESULTS

The estimated mean energy expenditure of climbing Mt.Fuji was 3,340 kcal. Body temperatures fell during mountain climbing as the rate of heat loss to the progressively colder environment exceeded the rate of heat production created by muscular exercise.

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CONCLUSION

The Mac Quarto device provides a convenient method of recording physiological data during heavy exercise, even in a remote field setting. Further research is needed to determine the reliability of the data provided by the instrument.

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine

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