Skip Navigation LinksHome > May 2001 - Volume 33 - Issue 5 > COMPARISON OF BASAL METABOLIC RATE AMONG OF CHAMPION ATHLETE...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
F19m Free Communication/Poster Characteristics of Athletes

COMPARISON OF BASAL METABOLIC RATE AMONG OF CHAMPION ATHLETES WITH PREVALENCE OF “LONG‐TERM AND SHORT‐TERM ENERGY SYSTEMS”

Biehl, C1; Alvarenga, S M.R.1; Guimarães, J N.F.1; Segura C, R2

Free Access
Collapse Box

Author Information

1Departmento de Biociências da Atividade Fisica, UFRJ - RJ - Brazil

2Universidade de Barcelona- Spain

e-mail: biehl@unisys.com.br

The Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) is considered to be one of the main components that condition the expenditure of the athlete's total energy. Therefore an elaboration of a classification of BMR based on high level athletes would be of value in order to establish reference points. This study's objective was to compare BMR among champion athletes some with prevailing “long-term energy system” (L-TES) (marathon, route cyclism, athletic march, n = 16, 25.58 ± 2.79yrs; 173 ± 5.98cm) and others with “short-term energy system” (S-TES) (rowing, n = 10; 23.79 ± 2,79 years; 189 ± 3.84 cm), male athletes. The date of evaluation of BMR gathered after the Olympic and World games is characterized in the Sport Calendar as a period of “post competition”. A Mijjnhardt gas analyzer was used for calculating of VO2 and VCO2. Routine procedures were strictly followed in the preparation of basal conditions and during its measurements for BMR calculation. The measurement of the oxygen consumption was taken within 35 minutes.

Table. No caption av...
Image Tools

These results suggest that the S-TES athletes weigh (WT) more and have a higher lean body mass (LBM), which could sugest a higher BMR. The relative percentages showed S-TES athletes to have 27.27 % more BMR absolute (LO2min−1) than L-TES athletes, however there was hardly any difference in relative BMR (WT and LBM). Conclusion: An increased BMR in relation to WT and LBM in L-TES athletes could be as a result of a predominance of a “long-term energy system” developed during training.

Supported by the FAPERG (P 150.206/99 and 170.169/99)

©2001The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Images

Share

Connect With Us