Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 1996 - Volume 28 - Issue 8 > Accuracy of five electronic pedometers for measuring distanc...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Special Communications: Technical Note

Accuracy of five electronic pedometers for measuring distance walked

BASSETT, DAVID R. JR.; AINSWORTH, BARBARA E.; LEGGETT, SUE R.; MATHIEN, CLARA A.; MAIN, JAMES A.; HUNTER, DAVID C.; DUNCAN, GLEN E.

Free Access
Article Outline
Collapse Box

Author Information

Exercise Science Unit, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics & Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Submitted for publication January 1996.

Accepted for publication April 1996.

The authors gratefully acknowledge the help of Pamela Andrews in data collection and analysis.

This research was partially supported by a grant from the Exhibit, Performance and Publication Expense Fund of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville Faculty Senate Research Council.

No financial support was received from any of the pedometer companies.

Address for correspondence: David R. Bassett, Jr., Exercise Science Unit, 1914 Andy Holt Ave., Knoxville, TN 37996.

Collapse Box

Abstract

This is a three-part study that examined the accuracy of five brands of electronic pedometers (Freestyle Pacer, Eddie Bauer, L.L. Bean, Yamax, and Accusplit) under a variety of different conditions. In Part I, 20 subjects walked a 4.88-km sidewalk course while wearing two devices of the same brand(on the left and right side of the body) for each of five different trials. There were significant differences among pedometers (P < 0.05), with the Yamax, Pacer, and Accusplit approximating the actual distance more closely than the other models. The Yamax pedometers showed close agreement, but the left and right Pacer pedometers differed significantly (P = 0.0003) and the Accusplit displayed a similar trend (P = 0.0657). In Part II, the effects of walking surface on pedometer accuracy were examined. Ten of the original subjects completed an additional five trials around a 400-m rubberized outdoor track. The devices showed similar values for sidewalk and track surfaces. In Part III, the effects of walking speed on pedometer accuracy were examined. Ten different subjects walked on a treadmill at various speeds (54, 67, 80, 94, and 107 m·min-1). Pedometers that displayed both distance and number of steps were examined. The Yamax was more accurate than the Pacer and Eddie Bauer at slow-to-moderate speeds(P < 0.05), though no significant differences were seen at the fastest speed. While there are variations among brands in terms of accuracy, electronic pedometers may prove useful in recording walking activities in free-living populations.

The electronic pedometer is a simple device used to measure walking distance. This instrument has the potential to provide epidemiologists with a lowcost, objective measure of walking behavior, which accounts for a substantial fraction of the calories expended in physical activity(5,7). Recently, Ainsworth et al.(2) reported that some physical activity questionnaires may yield imprecise estimates of daily walking distance. For instance, on the Harvard alumnus questionnaire, subjects recalled walking an average of 0.6 miles·d-1, while in their daily activity logs the walking distance was approximately 3.0 miles·d-1. Richardson et al.(13) showed similar patterns from the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Survey. These studies(2,13) have served as the impetus for carrying out a validation study to determine whether electronic pedometers could accurately track distance and number of steps over a range of different conditions.

The 1993 Summary Statement of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) states that Americans should accumulate at least 30 min of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days of the week (12). They further recommend that this goal can be met by walking two miles briskly. The Japanese recommend that adults walk at least “10,000 steps/day” to maintain optimum health (5,16). These goals emphasize walking behaviors, and the Japanese recommendation can only be monitored through the use of electronic pedometers. Electronic pedometers are increasingly being used in physical activity research. In one recent study, obese diabetic patients were given electronic pedometers and instructed to walk at least 10,000 steps·d-1 (16). They walked an average of 19,200 ± 2,100 steps·d-1 (mean± SE) with beneficial effects on weight loss and insulin sensitivity(16). The sale of pedometers in sporting good stores shows their acceptance by the general population. Thus, practitioners may find that these devices are useful as a motivational tool in exercise prescription.

The question is, how accurate are these commercial pedometers in measuring distance walked? The electronic pedometers tested in the present study are worn on the belt or waistband. They all operate on the same principle-a horizontal, spring-suspended lever arm moves up and down with vertical accelerations of the hip. With each step, the lever arm makes an electrical contact and one event is recorded (Fig. 1). Previous research on the older, mechanical style pedometers was carried out by Gayle et al. (4), Montoye (11), Washburn et al. (15), Bassey (3), and Kemper and Verschuur (8). In general, researchers have concluded that the large errors involved with the gear-driven, mechanical pedometers make them unsuitable for precise work (9,11). Limited information is available on the accuracy of the newer electronic pedometers (5,10). The purpose of the present study was to examine the accuracy of five brands of electronic pedometers for measuring distance walked and number of steps. The goals of this three-part study were: (a) to examine the accuracy of five different pedometers over a 3.03-mile (4.88-km) sidewalk course; (b) to compare the accuracy of the pedometers on different surfaces (concrete sidewalk versus rubber track); and(c) to examine the effects of walking speed on pedometer accuracy during treadmill walking at 2.0-4.0 mph (54-107 m·min-1).

Figure 1-Photograph ...
Figure 1-Photograph ...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline

METHODS

Pedometers

Five models of commercially available electronic pedometers were tested(Fig. 2)-Freestyle Pacer 798 (Camarillo, CA), Eddie Bauer Compustep II (Redmond, WA), L.L. Bean Pedometer (Freeport, ME), Yamax Digi-walker DW-500 (Tokyo, Japan), and the Accusplit Fitness Walker (San Jose, CA). All of these pedometers measure vertical oscillations, and all, excluding the Yamax DW-500, utilize the individual subject's stride length to compute the distance walked. The decision to use the Yamax DW-500 was based upon the fact that this model is being used by researchers at the Aerobics Center in Dallas, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of South Carolina, and the Center for Health Promotion in Indians in New Mexico. Several other Yamax models (DW-400, DW-450, DW-480, DW-550, DW-580) do have a stride length function, but they were not selected for study inclusion. The Yamax DW-500 was selected based upon its growing use in research studies.

Figure 2-Electronic ...
Figure 2-Electronic ...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
Subjects

To obtain results that would be generalizable to a broad population, both male and female adults (18-65 yr of age) were asked to participate in the study. Twenty persons (13 females and 7 males) volunteered for Part I of the study. A subset of 10 of them also volunteered for Part II. Another group of 10 different subjects (five females and five males) participated in Part III of the study. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects prior to their participation in the study. Age was recorded, and height and weight were measured in one layer of street clothing (without shoes). To characterize the subjects' physical profile, skinfold measurements were taken at three sites using a Lange skinfold caliper, and percent body fat was estimated from the formulas provided by Jackson and Pollock (6). The subjects' physical characteristics are shown in Table 1.

Table 1
Table 1
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
Part I-Accuracy of Pedometers on Sidewalks

The accuracy of the pedometers in measuring distance walked and number of steps taken was determined by having the subjects cover a 3.03-mile (4.88-km) level course on cement sidewalks. The sidewalk course length was measured twice and determined to be 3.02879 and 3.02784 miles by using a calibrated measuring wheel (Rolatape Corporation, Model 400, Spokane WA). Each subject completed six different trials on different days, wearing the same pair of shoes for all trials. Table 2

Table 2
Table 2
Image Tools

Subjects wore two pedometers of the same brand (on left and right sides) for each trial. Pedometer placement was standardized by placing them on the belt or waistband, approximately 5-7 cm from the umbilicus. This placement was consistent with the manufacturer's instructions (which all specified the“belt or waistband” and the mid-line of the thigh or “as close to the center of the body as possible”).

The stride length was measured to compute distances walked. To determine stride length, subjects were asked to take 20 strides at their normal walking pace, in an indoor hallway. The distance covered was divided by 20, to compute the average stride length. This value was entered into the electronic pedometers. The L.L. Bean and Accusplit pedometers, however, did not allow the stride length to be entered in this fashion. Instead, the manufacturer's instructions were followed. This involved a calibration routine where the subject walked a fixed distance while the pedometer calculated the stride length. Pedometers with a variable sensitivity switch were always placed in the highest setting. Some pedometers had two sensitivity settings-“walk” and “run.” The Pacer had a number of settings ranging from “+” (more sensitive) to “-”(less sensitive). Adjusting the pedometer sensitivity setting alters the amount of vertical acceleration at the hip that is needed to register a footstrike.

The actual number of steps taken during the 4.88-km walk was determined using a hand-tally counter. Subjects clicked the counter once for each left foot heelstrike, and the final number was doubled to give the total number of steps. Each subject walked at his/her self-selected velocity, and the amount of time it took to complete the walk was recorded.

Back to Top | Article Outline
Part II-Effects of Walking Surface on Pedometer Accuracy

To examine the effects of variations in the “hardness” of walking surfaces, 10 of the original 20 subjects completed additional trials with all five pedometers on rubberized track surface. A 400-m outdoor track was used for this purpose. To obtain a distance equal to 3.03 miles (4.88 km) the subjects walked 12 laps around the track, doing two laps in lane 1 (400 m·lap-1) and 10 laps in lane 2 (407.5 m·lap-1). They walked counter-clockwise around the track, approximately 10 inches (25 cm) to the right of the inside lane marker.

Back to Top | Article Outline
Part III-Effects of Walking Speed on Pedometer Accuracy

To examine the effects of walking speed on the accuracy of three pedometers(Freestyle Pacer, Eddie Bauer, and Yamax) 10 different subjects walked at various speeds on a motor-driven treadmill (Quinton model Q55XT, Seattle, WA). The treadmill speed was calibrated by measuring the belt length (3.190 m) and measuring the time it took to complete 25 revolutions of the treadmill belt. A carpenter's level was used to calibrate the treadmill grade to 0.0%, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The accuracy of the carpenter's level itself was checked by turning it horizontally 180°, and observing that the bubble was still centered.

The order in which the pedometers were worn was randomized to account for the possibility of an “order effect.” All pedometers were worn on the right side of the body using the landmarks specified previously. Stride length was first measured in the hallway at a “normal walking speed,” and then on the treadmill at 3.0 mph (80.4 m·min-1). The latter value was entered into the pedometer. Five speeds were used (2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 mph). The actual number of steps taken was determined by using a hand-tally counter, as previously described. Each stage lasted 5 min, and the stages were interrupted just long enough to increase the treadmill speed and record data. Dependent variables were stride length, stride frequency, the percentage of footstrikes recorded, and the percentage of actual distance covered.

Back to Top | Article Outline
Statistical Analysis

In Part I of this study (Accuracy of Pedometers on Sidewalks), comparisons of distance and percentage of actual steps recorded were analyzed using contrasts (1). Planned contrasts were carried out between each of the five different pedometer brands, and between the same-brand pedometers worn on the left and right sides of the body.

In Part II (Effects of Walking Surface on Pedometer Accuracy), comparisons of percent difference scores for distance (sidewalk-track) were analyzed using contrasts. Planned contrasts were carried out between each of the five pedometer brands, and between the same-brand pedometers worn on the left and right sides of the body.

In Part III (Effects of Walking Speed on Pedometer Accuracy), comparisons of percentage of actual steps recorded and percentage of actual distance were analyzed using contrasts. We wanted to determine if there was a significant difference between the three pedometer brands (Yamax, Pacer, and Eddie Bauer), at each velocity. Hence, three contrasts were carried out at five walking velocities, for a total of 15 contrasts. Two-sided comparisons and an overall significance level of P = 0.05 were used throughout.

Back to Top | Article Outline

RESULTS

Part I: Accuracy of Pedometers on Sidewalks

The mean scores for 20 subjects were computed for each brand of motion sensor. Figure 3 shows the mean distance recorded by each pedometer over the 3.03-mile (4.88-km) walking course, using pedometers worn on either the left or right side of the body. There were significant differences in distance walked between pedometers (see significance bars in figure legend). The Yamax, Pacer, and Accusplit were significantly more accurate than the L.L. Bean and Eddie Bauer models. The two Yamax pedometers showed very close agreement, while the Pacer showed significantly higher distance scores for the pedometer worn on the left side of the body(P = 0.0003) versus the right side, and the Accusplit showed a trend in this direction (P = 0.0657). For the three pedometers that displayed steps (Eddie Bauer, Pacer, and Yamax), there was no statistical difference in the percent of actual steps recorded. No differences were observed between trials in walking speed over the 4.88-km sidewalk course.

Figure 3-Comparison ...
Figure 3-Comparison ...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
Part II: Effects of Walking Surface on Pedometer Accuracy

In general, the effect of walking surface (track versus sidewalk) on distance recorded was not significant (Fig. 4). However, the distance value for the left-side Pacer pedometer was 14% higher on the track, compared with the sidewalk (P = 0.0220). All other devices, regardless of which side of the body they were worn on, showed similar values for sidewalk and track surfaces (P > 0.05).

Figure 4-Comparison ...
Figure 4-Comparison ...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
Part III: Effects of Walking Speed on Pedometer Accuracy

Three pedometer brands were compared to determine if there were differences in the percentage of steps recorded and the percentage of actual distance, at various speeds. At slow-to-moderate speeds (2.0-3.0 mph or 54-80 m·min-1), the Yamax pedometer was more accurate than the Eddie Bauer and Pacer brands. At faster speeds (4.0 mph or 107 m·min-1) the Eddie Bauer and Pacer accuracy improved, showing better agreement with the Yamax pedometer.

The average stride length at each of the walking speeds was as follows: 0.59 ± 0.03 m·stride-1 (54 m·min-1); 0.65± 0.02 m·stride-1 (67 m·min-1); 0.72± 0.03 m·stride-1 (80 m·min-1); 0.78± 0.04 m·stride-1 (94 m·min-1); and 0.86± 0.05 m·stride-1 (107 m·min-1) (mean± SD).

Back to Top | Article Outline

DISCUSSION

Part I of this study was designed to test the ability of pedometers to record walking distance and steps taken on a sidewalk course. The electronic pedometers were found to provide a reasonably accurate estimate of the distance walked and number of steps taken. The fact that several pedometers underestimated distance is probably due to a failure to register each footstrike. The Yamax was the most accurate, recording 100.7% (left) and 100.6% (right) of all steps taken. The Pacer recorded 102.6% and 87.5% of actual steps for the left and right pedometers, respectively. The Eddie Bauer recorded 94.0% (left) and 91.6% (right) of actual steps.

When the individual subject's stride length was taken into account, the average distance for two pedometers of the same brand was always within 0.53 km for the 4.88-km course (an 11% difference). The Yamax pedometer differed by only 0.05 km for the 4.88-km course (a 1% difference). The Yamax also had the smallest between-subject standard deviation (0.36 km). All of these pedometers respond to vertical accelerations of the body, and their sensitivity is determined by the “threshold” for vertical acceleration that is needed to trigger an event (3). Therefore, some brands are more sensitive than others (i.e., they have a lower threshold acceleration), resulting in an increased ability to register actual steps.

The variability in results from two units of the same model for the Pacer and Accusplit pedometers was a cause for concern. Earlier work on mechanical pedometers by Gayle et al. (4), Washburn et al.(15), and Saris and Binkhorst (14) showed differences between two units of the same model, which they attributed to variations in spring tension. Our results indicate that the same concern exists with some of the newer electronic pedometers. Only the Yamax pedometer was very consistent between units. The inaccuracy between units of the same model is probably due to quality control in manufacturing. When all of the pedometers were considered together, the devices worn on the left side of the body did not differ significantly from those worn on the right. Even though the subjects made several right-hand turns when walking around the sidewalk course, this was not evidenced in significant differences between right and left pedometers. Hence, we conclude that it does not matter which side of the body they are worn on.

In Part II of the study, we compared differences in the walking surface on the accuracy of the pedometers. The major finding was that different walking surfaces did not affect pedometer accuracy. We had hypothesized that cushioned surfaces might decrease the impact force, and thus lessen the vertical acceleration experienced by the pedometers worn on the hip. However, most of the pedometers gave similar readings for distance, regardless of whether the subjects walked on a concrete sidewalk or cushioned, rubberized track surface.Figure 5

Figure 5-Effects of ...
Figure 5-Effects of ...
Image Tools

In Part III, we examined the effect of walking speed on three pedometers that provided information on the number of steps taken (Yamax, Eddie Bauer, and Pacer). The Yamax was more accurate at slower speeds compared with the other pedometers. This may reflect a high level of quality control-in the proposed Japanese Industrial Standards set by the Ministry of Industry and Trading Regulations, the maximum permissible rate of miscounting steps is 0.3%(5). The Yamax met this specification during treadmill walking at speeds over 80 m·min-1. However, at very slow speeds(e.g., 54 m·min-1) all three brands tended to underestimate distance. This was due to a “failure to register” footstrikes, which was especially apparent in the Eddie Bauer pedometer (it registered only 40% of the steps taken at 2.0 mph). The inaccuracy results from the fact that vertical accelerations measured at the hip are less pronounced at slow speeds. Similarly, at faster speeds (e.g., 107 m·min-1) the pedometers also underestimated distance. This error was due to a lengthening of the actual stride length rather than a miscounting of steps.

The electronic pedometer would appear to be useful for validating questions about “distance walked” on physical activity questionnaires. Despite the fact that variations in walking speed will affect the results, if a subject walks between 2.0 mph (54 m·min-1) and 4.0 mph (107 m·min-1), the most accurate pedometer brand (Yamax) should yield distance values that are within 20% of the actual distance(Fig. 6). In addition, if most of the walking is performed at intermediate speeds, the pedometer value should be within 10% of the actual distance. Respondents are reported to underestimate daily walking distance by as much as 5-fold on physical activity surveys(2). Thus, even with an error rate of 10-20%, pedometers are likely to be considerably more accurate than a respondent's subjective estimate of walking distance. Electronic pedometers could be used as a criterion measure of “distance walked” to validate questions about walking on physical activity surveys.

Figure 6-Effects of ...
Figure 6-Effects of ...
Image Tools

Several other points are worth noting regarding the comparison of these pedometers. The Eddie Bauer and L.L. Bean have a maximum distance of 99.9 miles, while the Yamax has a maximum step count of 99,999 steps (approximately 50 miles or 80 km). The other pedometers are able to record maximum distances of 999.9 miles. Battery life according to the manufacturer varied substantially: Accusplit (7 yr), Eddie Bauer (“long-life battery”), Yamax (3 yr), L.L. Bean (not specified), and Pacer (1 yr). One Accusplit and one Pacer pedometer began to malfunction during the course of the study, and thus several trials had to be redone. This indicates that there may be differences in durability among the brands. However, we did not test a large enough sample of each brand to draw conclusions about durability. For epidemiologic studies, there may be an advantage to models that have a plastic cover that can be closed to prevent accidental resetting. The plastic cover on the Yamax and the Accusplit restricted the subject from viewing the display when it was closed. This could be advantageous in“blinding” the subject to the distance walked.

The generalizability of this study has some potential limitations. The results were determined on adults who were within the normal range for body weight and body fatness. Therefore, one should be cautious when extrapolating these findings to children or the extremely obese. Further research is needed to validate the pedometers in these groups. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of pedometers in correlating walking behaviors with health outcomes in public health settings.

In summary, this study tested the accuracy of electronic pedometers. During overground walking at self-selected velocities, most pedometers were accurate to within 11% for distance. However, one pedometer brand (Yamax) measured the number of steps and distance to within 1% of actual on the 4.88-km sidewalk course. The walking surface (sidewalk versus track) did not affect the accuracy of most pedometers. Treadmill studies showed that the Yamax pedometer was more accurate than the Eddie Bauer and Pacer at slow-to-moderate walking speeds, though no differences were seen at the fastest speed (4.0 mph or 107 m·min-1). The results indicate that some of the newer electronic pedometers have a greater absolute accuracy than the old-style mechanical pedometers. Electronic pedometers could prove to be useful in epidemiological studies of physical activity in free-living populations.

No Caption Available...
No Caption Available...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline

REFERENCES

1. Abacus Concepts. Super ANOVA. Berkely, CA: Abacus Concepts, Inc., 1989, pp. 198-204.

2. Ainsworth, B. E., A. S. Leon, M. T. Richardson, D. R. Jacobs, and R. S. Paffenbarger. Accuracy of the college alumnus physical activity questionnaire. J. Clin. Epidemiol. 46:1403-1411, 1993.

3. Bassey, E. J. Validation of a simple mechanical accelerometer (pedometer) for the estimation of walking activity. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 56:323-330, 1987.

4. Gayle, R., H. J. Montoye, and J. Philpot. Accuracy of pedometers for measuring distance walked. Res. Q. 48:632-636, 1977.

5. Hatano, Y. Use of the pedometer for promoting daily walking exercise. International Council for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 29:4-8, 1993.

6. Jackson, A. S. and M. L. Pollock. Practical assessment of body composition. Physician Sportsmed. 13(5):76-90, May 1985.

7. Kashiwazaki, H., T. Inaoka, T. Suzuki, and Y. Kondo. Correlations of pedometer readings with energy expenditure in workers during free-living daily activities. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 54:585-590, 1986.

8. Kemper, H. C. G., and R. Verschuur. Validity and reliability of pedometers in habitual physical activity research. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 37:71-82, 1977.

9. Meijer, G. A. L., K. R. Westerterp, F. M. H. Verhoeven, H. B. M. Koper, and F. T. Hoor. Methods to assess physical activity with special reference to motion sensors and accelerometers. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 38:221-228, 1991.

10. Mizuno, C., T. Yoshida, and M. Udo. Estimation of energy expenditure during walking and jogging by using an electro-pedometer.Ann. Physiol. Anthropol. 9:283-289, 1990.

11. Montoye, H. J. Use of movement sensors in measuring physical activity. Sci. Sports 3:223-236, 1988.

12. Pate, R. R., M. Pratt, S. N. Blair, et al. Physical activity and public health: a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine.J.A.M.A. 273:402-407, 1995.

13. Richardson, M. T., A. S. Leon, D. R. Jacobs, B. E. Ainsworth, and R. Serfass. Comprehensive evaluation of the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire. J. Clin. Epidemiol. 47:271-281, 1993.

14. Saris, W. H. M. and R. A. Binkhorst. The use of pedometer and actometer in studying daily physical activity in man.Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 37:219-228, 1977.

15. Washburn, R., M. K. Chin, and H. J. Montoye. Accuracy of pedometer in walking and running. Res. Q. 51:695-702, 1980.

16. Yamanouchi, K., T. Schinozaki, K. Chikada, et al. Daily walking combined with diet therapy is a useful means for obese NIDDM patients not only to reduce body weight but also to improve insulin sensitivity.Diabetes Care 18:775-778, 1995.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY; WALKING; EXERCISE; TREADMILL; SPEED; ENERGY COST

Cited By:

This article has been cited 247 time(s).

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Obesity: Responding to the global epidemic
Wadden, TA; Brownell, KD; Foster, GD
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3): 510-525.
10.1037//0022-006X.70.3.510
CrossRef
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Relationships between physical activity and motor skills in middle school children
Reed, JA; Metzker, A; Phillips, DA
Perceptual and Motor Skills, 99(2): 483-494.

British Journal of Sports Medicine
The validity and reliability of a novel activity monitor as a measure of walking
Ryan, CG; Grant, PM; Tigbe, WW; Granat, MH
British Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(9): 779-784.
10.1136/bjsm.2006.027276
CrossRef
American Journal of Medicine
Functional status and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Reardon, JZ; Lareau, SC; ZuWallack, R
American Journal of Medicine, 119(): S32-S37.
10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.08.005
CrossRef
Journal of American College Health
A pilot intervention to promote walking and wellness and to improve the health of college faculty and staff
Haines, DJ; Davis, L; Rancour, P; Robinson, M; Neel-Wilson, T; Wagner, S
Journal of American College Health, 55(4): 219-225.

Gait & Posture
Measuring distance walked and step count in children with cerebral palsy: An evaluation of two portable activity monitors
Kuo, YL; Culhane, KM; Thomason, P; Tirosh, O; Baker, R
Gait & Posture, 29(2): 304-310.
10.1016/j.gaitpost.2008.09.014
CrossRef
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
The impact of body-mass index and steps per day on blood pressure and fasting glucose in older adults
Swartz, AM; Strath, SJ; Parker, SJ; Miller, NE
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 16(2): 188-200.

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
The provision of compulsory school physical activity: Associations with physical activity, fitness and overweight in childhood and twenty years later
Cleland, V; Dwyer, T; Blizzard, L; Venn, A
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5(): -.
ARTN 14
CrossRef
Health Promotion Journal of Australia
The effectiveness of a brief intervention using a pedometer and step-recording diary in promoting physical activity in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance
Furber, S; Monger, C; Franco, L; Mayne, D; Jones, LA; Laws, R; Waters, L
Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 19(3): 189-195.

Public Health Nursing
Self-reported physical activity validated by pedometer: A pilot study
Speck, BJ; Looney, SW
Public Health Nursing, 23(1): 88-94.

American Journal of Medicine
Functional status and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Reardon, JZ; Lareau, SC; ZuWallack, R
American Journal of Medicine, 119(): S32-S37.
10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.08.005
CrossRef
Multiple Sclerosis
Walking capacities in multiple sclerosis measured by global positioning system odometer
Creange, A; Serre, I; Levasseur, M; Audry, D; Nineb, A; Boerio, D; Moreau, T; Maison, P
Multiple Sclerosis, 13(2): 220-223.
10.1177/1352458506070667
CrossRef
Pediatric Exercise Science
Comparison of pedometer and accelerometer measures of physical activity in preschool children
Cardon, G; De Bourdeaudhuij, I
Pediatric Exercise Science, 19(2): 205-214.

Health Psychology
Ongoing physical activity advice by humans versus computers: The community health advice by telephone (CHAT) trial
King, AC; Friedman, R; Marcus, B; Castro, C; Napolitano, M; Alm, D; Baker, L
Health Psychology, 26(6): 718-727.
10.1037/0278-6133.26.6.718
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Accuracy of step recording in free-living adults
Behrens, TK; Dinger, MK; Vesely, SK; Fields, DA
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 78(5): 542-547.

Quest
Adherence to exercise and physical activity - Preface
Morgan, WP; Dishman, RK
Quest, 53(3): 277-+.

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Effects of rope-jump training on the os calcis stiffness index of postpubescent girls
Arnett, MG; Lutz, B
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34(): 1913-1919.
10.1249/01.MSS.0000041196.58973.11
CrossRef
Pediatric Exercise Science
Free-living pedometer step counts of high school students
Wilde, BE; Corbin, CB; Le Masurier, GC
Pediatric Exercise Science, 16(1): 44-53.

Patient Education and Counseling
The effectiveness of physical activity counseling in a work-site setting - A randomized, controlled trial
Aittasalo, M; Miilunpalo, S; Suni, J
Patient Education and Counseling, 55(2): 193-202.
10.1016/j.pec.2003.09.003
CrossRef
Multiple Sclerosis
Accuracy of two electronic pedometers for measuring steps taken under controlled conditions among ambulatory individuals with multiple sclerosis
Motl, RW; McAuley, E; Snook, EM; Scott, JA
Multiple Sclerosis, 11(3): 343-345.
10.1191/1352458505ms1161oa
CrossRef
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Step Counting and Energy Expenditure Estimation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Healthy Elderly: Accuracy of 2 Motion Sensors
Furlanetto, KC; Bisca, GW; Oldemberg, N; Sant'Anna, TJ; Morakami, FK; Camillo, CA; Cavalheri, V; Hernandes, NA; Probst, VS; Ramos, EM; Brunetto, AF; Pitta, F
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(2): 261-267.
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.10.024
CrossRef
Research in Nursing & Health
Outcomes of a program to enhance exercise self-efficacy and improve fitness in black and hispanic college-age women
D'Alonzo, KT; Stevenson, JS; Davis, SE
Research in Nursing & Health, 27(5): 357-369.
10.1002/nur.20029
CrossRef
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
A preliminary study of one year of pedometer self-monitoring
Tudor-Locke, C; Bassett, DR; Swartz, AM; Strath, SJ; Parr, BB; Reis, JP; DuBose, KD; Ainsworth, BE
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 28(3): 158-162.

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Objectively-measured physical activity in new Zealand workers
Schofield, G; Badlands, H; Oliver, M
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 8(2): 143-151.

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Accuracy of pedometer steps and time for youth with disabilities
Beets, MW; Combs, C; Pitetti, KH; Morgan, M; Bryan, RR; Foley, JT
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 24(3): 228-244.

American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Promoting physical activity through hand-held computer technology
King, AC; Ahn, DK; Oliveira, BM; Atienza, AA; Castro, CM; Gardner, CD
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 34(2): 138-142.
10.1016/j.amepre.2007.09.025
CrossRef
Sociology of Health & Illness
Output that counts: pedometers, sociability and the contested terrain of older adult fitness walking
Copelton, DA
Sociology of Health & Illness, 32(2): 304-318.
10.1111/j.1467-9566.2009.01214.x
CrossRef
Diabetes Educator
Impact of using a pedometer on time spent walking in older adults with type 2 diabetes
Engel, L; Lindner, H
Diabetes Educator, 32(1): 98-107.
10.1177/0145721705284373
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
The association of objectively determined physical activity behavior among adolescent female friends
Schofield, L; Mummery, WK; Schofield, G; Hopkins, W
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 78(2): 9-15.

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Comparison of pedometer and accelerometer measures of free-living physical activity
Tudor-Locke, C; Ainsworth, BE; Thompson, RW; Matthews, CE
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34(): 2045-2051.
10.1249/01.MSS.0000039300.76400.16
CrossRef
Preventive Medicine
Increasing daily walking improves glucose tolerance in overweight women
Swartz, AM; Strath, SJ; Bassett, DR; Moore, JB; Redwine, BA; Groer, M; Thompson, DL
Preventive Medicine, 37(4): 356-362.
10.1016/S0091-7435(03)00144-0
CrossRef
Journal of School Health
Impact of Promoting Lifestyle Activity for Youth (PLAY) on children's physical activity
Pangrazi, RP; Beighle, A; Vehige, T; Vack, C
Journal of School Health, 73(8): 317-321.

Sports Medicine
How many steps/day are enough? Preliminary pedometer indices for public health
Tudor-Locke, C; Bassett, DR
Sports Medicine, 34(1): 1-8.

Sozial-Und Praventivmedizin
Assessment of physical activity with a pedometer and its relationship with VO(2)max among adolescents in Switzerland
Michaud, PA; Cauderay, M; Narring, F; Schutz, Y
Sozial-Und Praventivmedizin, 47(2): 107-115.

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
A home-based pedometer-driven walking program to increase physical activity in older adults with osteoarthritis of the knee: A preliminary study
Talbot, LA; Gaines, JM; Huynh, TN; Metter, EJ
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 51(3): 387-392.

American Journal of Health Behavior
Randomized trial of 2 interventions to increase older women's exercise
Conn, VS; Burks, KJ; Minor, MA; Mehr, DR
American Journal of Health Behavior, 27(4): 380-388.

Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology-Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee
Ambulatory activity and simple cardiorespiratory parameters at rest and submaximal exercise
Ludor-Locke, C; Ainsworth, BE; Whitt, MC; Thompson, RW; Addy, CL; Jones, DA
Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology-Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee, 28(5): 699-709.

Qjm-An International Journal of Medicine
Quantification of walking mobility in neurological disorders
Pearson, OR; Busse, ME; van Deursen, RWM; Wiles, CM
Qjm-An International Journal of Medicine, 97(8): 463-475.
10.1093/qjmed/hch084
CrossRef
Health Psychology
Sources and types of social support in youth physical activity
Duncan, SC; Duncan, TE; Strycker, LA
Health Psychology, 24(1): 3-10.
10.1037/0278-6133.24.1.3
CrossRef
American Journal of Cardiology
Influence of age and gender on exercise training-induced blood pressure reduction in systemic hypertension
Ishikawa, K; Ohta, T; Zhang, JG; Hashimoto, S; Tanaka, H
American Journal of Cardiology, 84(2): 192-196.

Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
Randomized Controlled Trial of Aerobic Exercise on Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factors in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Yale Exercise and Survivorship Study
Irwin, ML; Varma, K; Alvarez-Reeves, M; Cadmus, L; Wiley, A; Chung, GG; DiPietro, L; Mayne, ST; Yu, H
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 18(1): 306-313.
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0531
CrossRef
Sports Medicine
Estimating human energy expenditure - A review of techniques with particular reference to doubly labelled water
Ainslie, PN; Reilly, T; Westerterp, KR
Sports Medicine, 33(9): 683-698.

Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Bodies in motion: Monitoring daily activity and exercise with motion sensors in people with chronic pulmonary disease
Steele, BC; Belza, B; Cain, K; Warms, C; Coppersmith, J; Howard, J
Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 40(5): 45-58.

Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
Comparison of the LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire with a 7-day diary and pedometer
Stel, VS; Smit, JH; Pluijm, SMF; Visser, M; Deeg, DJH; Lips, P
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 57(3): 252-258.
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2003.07.008
CrossRef
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Modifying physical activity in a multiethnic sample of low-income women: One-year results from the IMPACT (increasing motivation for physical activity) project
Albright, CL; Pruitt, L; Castro, C; Gonzalez, A; Woo, S; King, AC
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 30(3): 191-200.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association
Promotion of physical activity in low-income mothers using pedometers
Clarke, KK; Freeland-Graves, J; Klohe-Lehman, DM; Milani, TJ; Nuss, HJ; Laffrey, S
Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(6): 962-967.
10.1016/j.jada.2007.03.010
CrossRef
Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Validity of Four Gait Models to Estimate Walked Distance From Vertical COG Acceleration
Lopez, AM; Alvarez, D; Gonzalez, RC; Alvarez, JC
Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 24(4): 360-367.

Gerontology
Glucose control and walking in a multiethnic sample of older adults
Swartz, AM; Strath, SJ; Miller, NE; Cashin, SE; Cieslik, LJ
Gerontology, 53(6): 454-461.
10.1159/000118600
CrossRef
Annals of Human Biology
UK adults exhibit higher step counts in summer compared to winter months
Hamilton, SL; Clemes, SA; Griffiths, PL
Annals of Human Biology, 35(2): 154-169.
10.1080/03014460801908058
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Waist Circumference, Pedometer Placement, and Step-Counting Accuracy in Youth
Abel, MG; Hannon, JC; Eisenman, PA; Ransdell, LB; Pett, M; Williams, DP
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 80(3): 434-444.

Bmc Public Health
Influence of socio-economic status on habitual physical activity and sedentary behavior in 8-to 11-year old children
Drenowatz, C; Eisenmann, JC; Pfeiffer, KA; Welk, G; Heelan, K; Gentile, D; Walsh, D
Bmc Public Health, 10(): -.
ARTN 214
CrossRef
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Relation of lifestyle factors to metacarpal bone mineral density was different depending on menstrual condition and years since menopause in Japanese women
Ishikawa, K; Ohta, T; Hirano, M; Yoshimoto, K; Tanaka, S; Inoue, S
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 54(1): 9-13.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Reliability and validity issues concerning large-scale surveillance of physical activity
Washburn, RA; Heath, GW; Jackson, AW
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 71(2): S104-S113.

American Journal of Health Behavior
Minimal-contact physical activity interventions in women: A pilot study
DuVall, C; Dinger, MK; Taylor, EL; Bemben, D
American Journal of Health Behavior, 28(3): 280-286.

Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing
Position-sensing technologies for movement analysis in stroke rehabilitation
Zheng, H; Black, ND; Harris, ND
Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, 43(4): 413-420.

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
The effects of prosthetic foot design on physiologic measurements, self-selected walking velocity, and physical activity in people with transtibial amputation
Hsu, MJ; Nielsen, DH; Lin-Chan, SJ; Shurr, D
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87(1): 123-129.
10.1016/j.apmr.2005.07.310
CrossRef
Journal of Sports Sciences
Pedometer reliability, validity and daily activity targets among 10-to 15-year-old boys
Jago, R; Watson, K; Baranowski, T; Zakeri, I; Sunmi, YM; Baranowski, J; Conry, K
Journal of Sports Sciences, 24(3): 241-251.
10.1080/02640410500141661
CrossRef
Physical Therapy
Using activity monitors to measure physical activity in free-living conditions
Berlin, JE; Storti, KL; Brach, JS
Physical Therapy, 86(8): 1137-1145.

Metabolism-Clinical and Experimental
Regular use of pedometer does not enhance beneficial outcomes in a physical activity intervention study in type 2 diabetes mellitus
Bjorgaas, MR; Vik, JT; Stolen, T; Lydersen, S; Grill, V
Metabolism-Clinical and Experimental, 57(5): 605-611.
10.1016/j.metabol.2007.12.002
CrossRef
Sports Medicine
Physical activity assessment in children and adolescents
Sirard, JR; Pate, RR
Sports Medicine, 31(6): 439-454.

Journal of Arthroplasty
Comparative study of the activity of total hip arthroplasty patients and normal subjects
Goldsmith, AAJ; Dowson, D; Wroblewski, BM; Siney, PD; Fleming, PA; Lane, JM; Stone, MH; Walker, R
Journal of Arthroplasty, 16(5): 613-619.

Physical Therapy
Identifying early decline of physical function in community-dwelling older women: Performance-based and self-report measures
Brach, JS; VanSwearingen, JM; Newman, AB; Kriska, AM
Physical Therapy, 82(4): 320-328.

Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
Balance and mobility performance as treatable risk factors for recurrent falling in older persons
Stel, VS; Smit, JH; Pluijm, SMF; Lips, P
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 56(7): 659-668.
10.1016/S0895-4356(03)00082-9
CrossRef
American Journal of Health Promotion
The relationship between convenience of destinations and walking levels in older women
King, WC; Brach, JS; Belle, S; Killingsworth, R; Fenton, M; Kriska, AM
American Journal of Health Promotion, 18(1): 74-82.

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Accelerometer monitoring of home- and community-based ambulatory activity after stroke
Haeuber, E; Shaughnessy, M; Forrester, LW; Coleman, KL; Macko, RF
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 85(): 1997-2001.
10.1016/j.apmr.2003.11.035
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
The Impact of a Student-Led Pedometer Intervention Incorporating Cognitive-Behavioral Strategies on Step Count and Self-Efficacy
Raedeke, TD; Focht, BC; King, JS
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 81(1): 87-96.

Pediatric Exercise Science
An examination of the activity patterns of elementary school children
Vincent, SD; Pangrazi, RP
Pediatric Exercise Science, 14(4): 432-441.

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Accuracy and reliability of 10 pedometers for measuring steps over a 400-m walk
Schneider, PL; Crouter, SE; Lukajic, O; Bassett, DR
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(): 1779-1784.
10.1249/01.MSS.0000089342.96098.C4
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Accumulating 10,000 steps: Does this meet current physical activity guidelines?
Le Masurier, GC; Sidman, CL; Corbin, CB
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 74(4): 389-394.

Journal of Transcultural Nursing
An investigation of habitual and incidental physical activity among Costa Rican and Costa Rican American teenage girls
D'Alonzo, KT; Cortese, LB
Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(3): 201-207.
10.1177/1043659607301296
CrossRef
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
The influence of wear paths produced by hip replacement patients during normal walking on wear rates
Bennett, D; Humphreys, L; O'Brien, S; Kelly, C; Orr, J; Beverland, DE
Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 26(9): 1210-1217.
10.1002/jor.20583
CrossRef
Clinical Rehabilitation
Pedometer step counts in individuals with neurological conditions
Elsworth, C; Dawes, H; Winward, C; Howells, K; Dennis, A; Sackley, C; Wade, D
Clinical Rehabilitation, 23(2): 171-175.
10.1177/0269215508098895
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Objective monitoring of physical activity using motion sensors and heart rate
Freedson, PS; Miller, K
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 71(2): S21-S29.

International Journal of Obesity
Open-loop feedback to increase physical activity in obese children
Goldfield, GS; Kalakanis, LE; Ernst, MM; Epstein, LH
International Journal of Obesity, 24(7): 888-892.

American Journal of Health Behavior
Recording activity in older women with TriTrac
Conn, VS; Minor, MA; Mehr, DR; Burks, KJ
American Journal of Health Behavior, 24(5): 370-378.

Acsms Health & Fitness Journal
Count your steps to health & fitness
Sidman, CL
Acsms Health & Fitness Journal, 6(1): 13-17.

Patient Education and Counseling
Preliminary outcome evaluation of the First Step Program: a daily physical activity intervention for individuals with type 2 diabetes
Tudor-Locke, CE; Myers, AM; Bell, RC; Harris, SB; Rodger, NW
Patient Education and Counseling, 47(1): 23-28.
PII S0738-3991(01)00169-0
CrossRef
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
The measurement and interpretation of children's physical activity
Rowlands, AV; Eston, RG
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 6(3): 270-276.

Preventive Medicine
Achieving 10,000 steps: A comparison of public transport users and drivers in a University setting
Villanueva, K; Giles-Corti, B; McCormack, G
Preventive Medicine, 47(3): 338-341.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.03.005
CrossRef
Journals of Gerontology Series A-Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Daily ambulation activity and task performance in community-dwelling older adults aged 63-71 years with preclinical disability
Petrella, JK; Cress, ME
Journals of Gerontology Series A-Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 59(3): 264-267.

Pediatric Exercise Science
Measuring physical activity in children with pedometers: Reliability, reactivity, and replacement of missing data
Rowe, DA; Mahar, MI; Raedeke, TD; Lore, J
Pediatric Exercise Science, 16(4): 343-354.

International Journal of Sports Medicine
Validity and reliability of the FitSense FS-1 speedometer during walking and running
Conger, SA; Strath, SJ; Bassett, DR
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 26(3): 208-213.
10.1055/s-2004-820958
CrossRef
Preventive Medicine
Precision and accuracy of an ankle-wom accelerometer-based pedometer in step counting and energy expenditure
Foster, RC; Lanningham-Foster, LM; Manohar, C; McCrady, SK; Nysse, LJ; Kaufman, KR; Padgett, DJ; Levine, JA
Preventive Medicine, 41(): 778-783.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.07.006
CrossRef
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Determinants of physical activity in an inclusive setting
Kodish, S; Kulinna, PH; Martin, J; Pangrazi, R; Darst, P
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 23(4): 390-409.

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Accuracy of voice-announcement pedometers for youth with visual impairment
Beets, MW; Foley, JT; Tindall, DWS; Lieberman, LJ
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 24(3): 218-227.

Sports Medicine
Measurement of physical activity in children with particular reference to the use of heart rate and pedometry
Rowlands, AV; Eston, RG; Ingledew, DK
Sports Medicine, 24(4): 258-272.

Chest
Quantitating physical activity in COPD using a triaxial accelerometer
Steele, BG; Holt, L; Belza, B; Ferris, S; Lakshminaryan, S; Buchner, DM
Chest, 117(5): 1359-1367.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association
Active living: On the Road with the 10,000 steps(sm) program
Lindberg, R
Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 100(8): 878-879.

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Increasing daily walking lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women
Moreau, KL; Degarmo, R; Langley, J; McMahon, C; Howley, ET; Bassett, DR; Thompson, DL
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(): 1825-1831.

Journal of Womens Health & Gender-Based Medicine
Evaluation of a two-part survey item to assess moderate physical activity: The cross-cultural activity participation study
Whitt, MC; Levin, S; Ainsworth, BE; Dubose, KD
Journal of Womens Health & Gender-Based Medicine, 12(3): 203-212.

American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Neighborhood design and walking - A quasi-experimental longitudinal study
Wells, NM; Yang, YZ
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 34(4): 313-319.
10.1016/j.amepre.2008.01.019
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
A prospective study of pedometer-determined physical activity and physical self-perceptions in children
Morgan, CF; Graser, SV; Pangrazi, RP
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 79(2): 133-140.

Clinical Biomechanics
Activity levels and polyethylene wear of patients 10 years post hip replacement
Bennett, D; Humphreys, L; O'Brien, S; Kelly, C; Orr, J; Beverland, DE
Clinical Biomechanics, 23(5): 571-576.
10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2007.12.006
CrossRef
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Physical Activity Measurement in Older Adults: Relationships With Mental Health
Parker, SJ; Strath, SJ; Swartz, AM
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 16(4): 369-380.

Circulation-Cardiovascular Genetics
Social- and Behavioral-Specific Genetic Effects on Blood Pressure Traits The Strong Heart Family Study
Franceschini, N; Rose, KM; Storti, KL; Rutherford, S; Voruganti, VS; Laston, S; Goring, HHH; Dyer, TD; Umans, JG; Lee, ET; Best, LG; Fabsitz, RR; Cole, SA; MacCluer, JW; North, KE
Circulation-Cardiovascular Genetics, 2(4): 396-U250.
10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.853630
CrossRef
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Lessons Learned from the Mothers' Overweight Management Study in 4 West Virginia WIC Offices
Krummel, D; Semmens, E; MacBride, AM; Fisher, B
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 42(3): S52-S58.
10.1016/j.jneb.2010.02.012
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Physical activity and situational motivation in physical education: Influence of the motivational climate and perceived ability
Parish, LE; Treasure, DC
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 74(2): 173-182.

American Journal of Hypertension
How much exercise is required to reduce blood pressure in essential hypertensives: A dose-response study
Ishikawa-Takata, K; Ohta, T; Tanaka, H
American Journal of Hypertension, 16(8): 629-633.
10.1016/S0895-7061(03)00895-1
CrossRef
Health Education & Behavior
Walking patterns in a sample of African American, native American, and Caucasian women: The cross-cultural activity participation study
Whitt, MC; DuBose, KD; Ainsworth, BE; Tudor-Locke, C
Health Education & Behavior, 31(4): 45S-56S.
10.1177/1090198104266034
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Quantifying physical activity in first- through fourth-grade physical education via pedometry
Scruggs, PW; Beveridge, SK; Watson, DL; Clocksin, BD
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 76(2): 166-175.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Middle school physical education quantification: A pedometer physical activity steps/min guideline
Scruggs, PW
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 78(4): 284-292.

Plos Medicine
Safe to walk? Neighborhood safety and physical activity among public housing residents
Bennett, GG; McNeill, LH; Wolin, KY; Duncan, DT; Puleo, E; Emmons, KM
Plos Medicine, 4(): 1599-1607.
ARTN e306
CrossRef
Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology-Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee
Physical activity assessment options within the context of the Canadian physical activity, fitness, and lifestyle appraisal
Tremblay, MS; Shephard, RJ; McKenzie, TL; Gledhill, N
Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology-Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee, 26(4): 388-407.

Preventive Medicine
Commercially available pedometers: considerations for accurate step counting
Melanson, EL; Knoll, JR; Bell, ML; Donahoo, WT; Hill, JO; Nysse, LJ; Lanningham-Foster, L; Peters, JC; Levine, JA
Preventive Medicine, 39(2): 361-368.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.01.032
CrossRef
Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Measuring energy expenditure in cardiac patients using the Body Media (TM) Armband versus indirect calorimetry - A validation study
Cole, PJ; Lemura, LM; Klinger, TA; Strohecker, K; McConnell, TR
Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 44(3): 262-271.

British Journal of Sports Medicine
Validity of the inexpensive Stepping Meter in counting steps in free living conditions: a pilot study
De Cocker, K; Cardon, G; De Bourdeaudhuij, I
British Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(8): 714-716.
10.1136/bjsm.2005.025296
CrossRef
Bmc Public Health
Socio-economic and lifestyle factors associated with overweight in Flemish adult men and women
Duvigneaud, N; Wijndaele, K; Matton, L; Deriemaeker, P; Philippaerts, R; Lefevre, J; Thomis, M; Duquet, W
Bmc Public Health, 7(): -.
ARTN 23
CrossRef
Journal of Family Practice
Have pedometer, will travel
Rowland, K; Schumann, SA
Journal of Family Practice, 57(2): 90-93.

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Ambulatory Physical Activity Profiles of Older Adults
Strath, SJ; Swartz, AM; Cashin, SE
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 17(1): 46-56.

International Journal of Sports Medicine
Pedometer Accuracy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure
Jehn, M; Schmidt-Trucksass, A; Schuster, T; Hanssen, H; Halle, M; Kohler, F
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 31(3): 186-191.
10.1055/s-0029-1243641
CrossRef
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Continuous activity monitoring in persons at high risk for diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation
Armstrong, DG; Abu-Rumman, PL; Nixon, BP; Boulton, AJM
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, 91(9): 451-455.

International Journal of Sports Medicine
Ability of different physical activity monitors to detect movement during treadmill walking
Leenders, NYJM; Nelson, TE; Sherman, WM
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 24(1): 43-50.

Journal of Human Movement Studies
Changes in physical activity influenced by using a pedometer
Glazener, H; DeVoe, D; Nelson, T; Gotshall, R
Journal of Human Movement Studies, 46(6): 473-482.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Prompting physical activity among sedentary women using pedometers
Sidman, CL; Corbin, CB; Le Masurier, G
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 75(2): 122-129.

Preventive Medicine
BMI-referenced standards for recommended pedometer-determined steps/day in children
Tudor-Locke, C; Pangrazi, RP; Corbin, CB; Rutherford, WJ; Vincent, SD; Raustorp, A; Tomson, LM; Cuddihy, TF
Preventive Medicine, 38(6): 857-864.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2003.12.018
CrossRef
Journal of Womens Health
The relationship between daily steps and body composition in postmenopausal women
Krumm, EM; Dessieux, OL; Andrews, P; Thompson, DL
Journal of Womens Health, 15(2): 202-210.

Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Walking activity, body composition and blood pressure in adults with intellectual disabilities
Stanish, HI; Draheim, CC
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(3): 183-190.
10.1111/j.1468-3148.2006.00314.x
CrossRef
Preventive Medicine
Effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention and a structured exercise intervention in older adults
Opdenacker, J; Boen, F; Coorevits, N; Delecluse, C
Preventive Medicine, 46(6): 518-524.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.02.017
CrossRef
European Journal of Sport Science
Validation of a one-day self-report questionnaire for physical activity assessment in healthy adults
Leicht, A
European Journal of Sport Science, 8(6): 389-396.
10.1080/17461390802368994
CrossRef
Obesity
Exercise Improves Body Fat, Lean Mass, and Bone Mass in Breast Cancer Survivors
Irwin, ML; Alvarez-Reeves, M; Cadmus, L; Mierzejewski, E; Mayne, ST; Yu, H; Chung, GG; Jones, B; Knobf, MT; DiPietro, L
Obesity, 17(8): 1534-1541.
10.1038/oby.2009.18
CrossRef
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Expected values for pedometer-determined physical activity in older populations
Tudor-Locke, C; Hart, TL; Washington, TL
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6(): -.
ARTN 59
CrossRef
International Journal of Obesity
Controlled outcome evaluation of the First Step Program: a daily physical activity intervention for individuals with type II diabetes
Tudor-Locke, C; Bell, RC; Myers, AM; Harris, SB; Ecclestone, NA; Lauzon, N; Rodger, NW
International Journal of Obesity, 28(1): 113-119.
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802485
CrossRef
Health Education Research
Differences in physical activity levels between urban and rural school children in Cyprus
Loucaides, CA; Chedzoy, SM; Bennett, N
Health Education Research, 19(2): 138-147.
10.1093/her/cyg014
CrossRef
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Does augmented feedback from pedometers increase adults' walking behavior?
Eastep, E; Beveridge, S; Eisenman, P; Ransdell, L; Shultz, B
Perceptual and Motor Skills, 99(2): 392-402.

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Assessment of walking activity using a pedometer and survey in adults with mental retardation
Stanish, HI; Draheim, CC
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 22(2): 136-145.

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Spring-levered versus piezo-electric pedometer accuracy in overweight and obese adults
Crouter, SE; Schneider, PL; Bassett, DR
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(): 1673-1679.
10.1284/01.mss.0000181677.36658.a8
CrossRef
Ethnicity & Disease
Physical activity assessment methods in the Jackson Heart Study
Dubbert, PM; Carithers, T; Ainsworth, BE; Taylor, HA; Wilson, G; Wyatt, SB
Ethnicity & Disease, 15(4): S56-S61.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Methodological considerations for researchers and practitioners using pedometers to measure physical (ambulatory) activity
Tudor-Locke, CE; Myers, AM
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 72(1): 1-12.

International Journal of Obesity
The relationship between pedometer-determined ambulatory activity and body composition variables
Tudor-Locke, C; Ainsworth, BE; Whitt, MC; Thompson, RW; Addy, CL; Jones, DA
International Journal of Obesity, 25(): 1571-1578.

Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Agreement between participant-rated and compendium-coded intensity of daily activities in a triethnic sample of women ages 40 years and older
Wilcox, S; Irwin, ML; Addy, C; Ainsworth, BE; Stolarczyk, L; Whitt, M; Tudor-Locke, C
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23(4): 253-262.

Pediatric Exercise Science
Does reactivity exist in children when measuring activity levels with pedometers?
Vincent, SD; Pangrazi, RP
Pediatric Exercise Science, 14(1): 56-63.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Contribution of structured exercise class participation and informal walking for exercise to daily physical activity in community-dwelling older adults
Tudor-Locke, C; Jones, GR; Myers, AM; Paterson, DH; Ecclestone, NA
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 73(3): 350-356.

Mental Retardation
Walking habits of adults with mental retardation
Stanish, HI; Draheim, CC
Mental Retardation, 43(6): 421-427.

Canadian Medical Association Journal
Prescribing exercise as preventive therapy
Warburton, DER; Nicol, CW; Bredin, SSD
Canadian Medical Association Journal, 174(7): 961-974.

Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Self-reported physical activity in Hispanic adults living with HIV: Comparison with accelerometer and pedometer
Ramirez-Marrero, FA; Rivera-Brown, AM; Nazario, CM; Rodriguez-Orengo, JF; Smit, E; Smith, BA
Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 19(4): 283-294.
10.1016/j.jana.2008.04.003
CrossRef
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Influence of non-level walking on pedometer accuracy
Leicht, AS; Crowther, RG
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12(3): 361-365.
10.1016/j.jsams.2008.01.007
CrossRef
Public Health Nutrition
Effects of peer influence on dietary intake and physical activity in schoolchildren
Finnerty, T; Reeves, S; Dabinett, J; Jeanes, YM; Vogele, C
Public Health Nutrition, 13(3): 376-383.
10.1017/S1368980009991315
CrossRef
British Journal of Health Psychology
The theory of planned behaviour predicts self-reports of walking, but does not predict step count
Scott, EJ; Eves, FF; French, DP; Hoppe, R
British Journal of Health Psychology, 12(): 601-620.
10.1348/135910706X160335
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
A preliminary study to determine instrument responsiveness to change with a walking program: Physical activity logs versus pedometers
Tudor-Locke, C
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 72(3): 288-292.

Controlled Clinical Trials
The DOSE study: a clinical trial to examine efficacy and dose response of exercise as treatment for depression
Dunn, AL; Trivedi, MH; Kampert, JB; Clark, CG; Chambliss, HO
Controlled Clinical Trials, 23(5): 584-603.
PII S0197-2456(02)00226-X
CrossRef
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Initial validation of the CSA activity monitor during rehabilitative exercise among older adults with chronic disease
Focht, BC; Sanders, WM; Brubaker, PH; Rejeski, WJ
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 11(3): 293-304.

Osteoporosis International
Effect of daily walking steps on ultrasound parameters of the calcaneus in elderly Japanese women
Kitagawa, J; Omasu, F; Nakahara, Y
Osteoporosis International, 14(3): 219-224.
10.1007/s00198-002-1339-2
CrossRef
Pediatric Exercise Science
Does reactivity exist in children when measuring activity levels with unsealed pedometers?
Ozdoba, R; Corbin, C; Le Masurier, G
Pediatric Exercise Science, 16(2): 158-166.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Steps counts among middle school students vary with aerobic fitness level
Le Masurier, GC; Corbin, CB
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 77(1): 14-22.

American Journal of Public Health
Television viewing and pedometer-determined physical activity among multiethnic residents of low-income housing
Bennett, GG; Wolin, KY; Viswanath, K; Askew, S; Puleo, E; Emmons, KM
American Journal of Public Health, 96(9): 1681-1685.
10.2105/AJPH.2005.080580
CrossRef
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Ambulatory physical activity during United States Army Basic Combat Training
Knapik, JJ; Darakjy, S; Hauret, KG; Canada, S; Marin, R; Jones, BH
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 28(2): 106-115.
10.1055/s-2006-924147
CrossRef
Journal of the American Dietetic Association
Predictors of weight loss in low-income mothers of young children
Clarke, KK; Freeland-Graves, J; Klohe-Lehman, DM; Bohman, TM
Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(7): 1146-1154.
10.1016/j.jada.2007.04.016
CrossRef
Pediatrics
Small changes in dietary sugar and physical activity as an approach to preventing excessive weight gain: The America on the move family study
Rodearmel, SJ; Wyatt, HR; Stroebele, N; Smith, SM; Ogden, LG; Hill, JO
Pediatrics, 120(4): e869-e879.
10.1542/peds.2006-2927
CrossRef
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
Electromyographic patterns suggest changes in motor unit physiology associated with early osteoarthritis of the knee
Ling, SM; Conwit, RA; Talbot, L; Shermack, M; Wood, JE; Dredge, EM; Weeks, MJ; Abernethy, DR; Metter, EJ
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 15(): 1134-1140.
10.1016/j.joca.2007.03.024
CrossRef
Gastroenterology
AGA technical review on obesity
Klein, S; Wadden, T; Sugerman, HJ
Gastroenterology, 123(3): 882-932.
10.1053/gast.2002.35514
CrossRef
Archives of Internal Medicine
Physical activity and functional status in community-dwelling older women - A 14-year prospective study
Brach, JS; FitzGerald, S; Newman, AB; Kelsey, S; Kuller, L; VanSwearingen, JM; Kriska, AM
Archives of Internal Medicine, 163(): 2565-2571.

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Occupational physical activity across occupational categories
Steele, R; Mummery, K
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 6(4): 398-407.

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Accuracy of pedometers and walking activity in adults with mental retardation
Stanish, HI
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 21(2): 167-179.

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
The role of energy expenditure in the differential weight loss in obese women on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets
Brehm, BJ; Spang, SE; Lattin, BL; Seeley, RJ; Daniels, SR; D'Alessio, DA
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 90(3): 1475-1482.
10.1210/jc.2004-1540
CrossRef
International Journal of Obesity
A physical activity program to reinforce weight maintenance following a behavior program in overweight/obese subjects
Villanova, N; Pasqui, F; Burzacchini, S; Forlani, G; Manini, R; Suppini, A; Melchionda, N; Marchesini, G
International Journal of Obesity, 30(4): 697-703.
10.1038/sj.ijo.0803185
CrossRef
Preventive Medicine
Physical activity among adults with intellectual disabilities living in community settings
Peterson, JJ; Janz, KF; Lowe, JB
Preventive Medicine, 47(1): 101-106.
10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.01.007
CrossRef
Motriz-Revista De Educacao Fisica
Habitual physical activity and resting heart rate variability in nipo-brazilians practitioners and non practitioners of PARK GOLF
Riquena, JP; Soares-Caldeira, LF; Perandini, LAB; Bara, MG; Nakamura, FY
Motriz-Revista De Educacao Fisica, 15(3): 582-591.

Journal of Applied Physiology
Validity of heart rate, pedometry, and accelerometry for predicting the energy cost of children's activities
Eston, RG; Rowlands, AV; Ingledew, DK
Journal of Applied Physiology, 84(1): 362-371.

Angiology
Relationship between free-living daily physical activity and ambulatory measures in older claudicants
Gardner, AW; Womack, CJ; Sieminski, DJ; Montgomery, PS; Killewich, LA; Fonong, T
Angiology, 49(5): 327-337.

American Heart Journal
Does the 6-minute walk test predict the prognosis in patients with NYHA class II or III chronic heart failure?
Roul, G; Germain, P; Bareiss, P
American Heart Journal, 136(3): 449-457.

Women & Health
Factors related to postpartum depressive symptoms in low-income women
Boury, JM; Larkin, KT; Krummel, DA
Women & Health, 39(3): 19-34.
10.1300/jo13v39003_02
CrossRef
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Objective measures of neighborhood environment and physical activity in older women
King, WC; Belle, SH; Brach, JS; Simkin-Silverman, LR; Soska, T; Kriska, AM
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 28(5): 461-469.
10.1016/j.amepre.2005.02.001
CrossRef
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Comparison of methods to estimate physical activity and energy expenditure in African American children
Ramirez-Marrero, FA; Smith, BA; Sherman, WM; Kirby, TE
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 26(5): 363-371.
10.1055/s-2004-821011
CrossRef
Diabetes Obesity & Metabolism
Relationship between pedometer-registered activity, aerobic capacity and self-reported activity and fitness in patients with type 2 diabetes
Bjorgaas, M; Vik, JT; Saeterhaug, A; Langlo, L; Sakshaug, T; Mohus, RM; Grill, V
Diabetes Obesity & Metabolism, 7(6): 737-744.
10.1111/j.1463-1326.2004.00464.x
CrossRef
Jama-Journal of the American Medical Association
Using pedometers to increase physical activity and improve health - A systematic review
Bravata, DM; Smith-Spangler, C; Sundaram, V; Gienger, AL; Lin, N; Lewis, R; Stave, CD; Olkin, I; Sirard, JR
Jama-Journal of the American Medical Association, 298(): 2296-2304.

Age and Ageing
Detection of walking periods and number of steps in older adults and patients with Parkinsons disease: accuracy of a pedometer and an accelerometry-based method
Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W; Scherder, E; Kamsma, Y
Age and Ageing, 37(4): 436-441.
10.1093/ageing/afn097
CrossRef
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Pedometer accuracy during stair climbing and bench stepping exercises
Ayabe, M; Aoki, J; Ishii, K; Takayama, K; Tanaka, H
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 7(2): 249-254.

Public Health Nutrition
What do pedometer counts represent? A comparison between pedometer data and data from four different questionnaires
De Cocker, KA; De Bourdeaudhuij, IM; Cardon, GM
Public Health Nutrition, 12(1): 74-81.
10.1017/S1368980008001973
CrossRef
Pediatric Exercise Science
Validation of an electronic pedometer for measurement of physical activity in children
Kilanowski, CK; Consalvi, AR; Epstein, LH
Pediatric Exercise Science, 11(1): 63-68.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Validity and reliability issues in objective monitoring of physical activity
Bassett, DR
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 71(2): S30-S36.

Diabetes Educator
Development of a theory-based daily activity intervention for individuals with type 2 diabetes
Tudor-Locke, CE; Myers, AM; Rodger, NW
Diabetes Educator, 27(1): 85-93.

International Journal of Sports Medicine
Effects of body mass index on the accuracy of an electronic pedometer
Swartz, AM; Bassett, DR; Moore, JB; Thompson, DL; Strath, SJ
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 24(8): 588-592.

Diabetes Care
Measuring habitual walking speed of people with type 2 diabetes - Are they meeting recommendations?
Johnson, ST; Tudor-Locke, C; McCargar, LJ; Bell, RC
Diabetes Care, 28(6): 1503-1504.

Oncology Nursing Forum
Social cognitive theory and physical activity during breast cancer treatment
Rogers, LQ; Shah, P; Dunnington, G; Greive, A; Shanmugham, A; Dawson, B; Courneya, KS
Oncology Nursing Forum, 32(4): 807-815.
10.1188/05.ONF.807-815
CrossRef
Canadian Journal of Public Health-Revue Canadienne De Sante Publique
Evaluation of quality of commercial pedometers
Tudor-Locke, C; Sisson, SB; Lee, SM; Craig, CL; Plotnikoff, RC; Bauman, A
Canadian Journal of Public Health-Revue Canadienne De Sante Publique, 97(): S10-S15.

Psychology of Sport and Exercise
Predicting attitudes and physical activity in an "at-risk" minority youth sample: A test of self-determination, theory
Vierling, KK; Standage, M; Treasure, DC
Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 8(5): 795-817.
10.1016/j.psychsport.2006.12.006
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Pedometer-determined physical activity and its comparison with the international physical activity questionnaire in a sample of Belgian adults
De Cocker, K; Cardon, G; De Bourdeaudhuij, I
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 78(5): 429-437.

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Activity-monitor accuracy in measuring step number and cadence in community-dwelling older adults
Grant, PM; Dall, PM; Mitchell, SL; Granat, MH
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 16(2): 201-214.

Psychology & Health
Effect of pretesting on intentions and behaviour: A pedometer and walking intervention
Spence, JC; Burgess, J; Rodgers, W; Murray, T
Psychology & Health, 24(7): 777-789.
10.1080/08870440801989938
CrossRef
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Validity of three accelerometers during treadmill walking and motor vehicle travel
Maddocks, M; Petrou, A; Skipper, L; Wilcock, A
British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44(8): 606-U31.
10.1136/bjsm.2008.051128
CrossRef
Sports Medicine
Challenges and opportunities for measuring physical activity in sedentary adults
Tudor-Locke, CE; Myers, AM
Sports Medicine, 31(2): 91-100.

Sports Medicine
Utility of pedometers for assessing physical activity - Convergent validity
Tudor-Locke, C; Williams, JE; Reis, JP; Pluto, D
Sports Medicine, 32(): 795-808.

Health Education Research
Harnessing motivational forces in the promotion of physical activity: the Community Health Advice by Telephone (CHAT) project
King, AC; Friedman, R; Marcus, B; Castro, C; Forsyth, L; Napolitano, M; Pinto, B
Health Education Research, 17(5): 627-636.

International Journal of Obesity
Relationship between ambulation and obesity in older persons with and without low back pain
Yamakawa, K; Tsai, CK; Haig, AJ; Miner, JA; Harris, MJ
International Journal of Obesity, 28(1): 137-143.
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802478
CrossRef
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Validity of a questionnaire to assess historical physical activity in older women
Winters-Hart, CS; Brach, JS; Storti, KL; Trauth, JM; Kriska, AM
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(): 2082-2087.
10.1249/01.MSS.0000147592.20866.07
CrossRef
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Physical activity and self-perception in school children assessed with the Children and Youth - Physical Self-Perception Profile
Raustorp, A; Stahle, A; Gudasic, H; Kinnunen, A; Mattsson, E
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 15(2): 126-134.
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2004.00406.x
CrossRef
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
Examining the interrelations among knowledge, interests, and learning strategies
Shen, B; Chen, A
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 25(2): 182-199.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Reliability of pedometer-determined free-living physical activity data in college women
Felton, GM; Tudor-Locke, C; Burkett, L
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 77(3): 304-308.

Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism-Physiologie Appliquee Nutrition Et Metabolisme
The effect of pedometer position and normal gait asymmetry on step count accuracy
Horvath, S; Taylor, DG; Marsh, JP; Kriellaars, DJ
Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism-Physiologie Appliquee Nutrition Et Metabolisme, 32(3): 409-415.
10.1139/H07-001
CrossRef
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Physical Activity Levels in American-Indian Adults The Strong Heart Family Study
Storti, KL; Arena, VC; Barmada, M; Bunker, CH; Hanson, RL; Laston, SL; Yeh, JL; Zmuda, JM; Howard, BV; Kriska, AM
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(6): 481-487.
10.1016/j.amepre.2009.07.019
CrossRef
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Pedometry Methods for Assessing Free-Living Youth
Tudor-Locke, C; McClain, JJ; Hart, TL; Sisson, SB; Washington, TL
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 80(2): 175-184.

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
The relationship among physical activity, motor competence and health-related fitness in 14-year-old adolescents
Hands, B; Larkin, D; Parker, H; Straker, L; Perry, M
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 19(5): 655-663.
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00847.x
CrossRef
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth With Intellectual Disabilities During Dynamic Movements
Pitetti, KH; Beets, MW; Flaming, J
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 26(4): 336-351.

European Journal of Applied Physiology
Effects of daily activity recorded by pedometer on peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)peak), ventilatory threshold and leg extension power in 30-to 69-year-old Japanese without exercise habit
Zhang, JG; Ohta, T; Ishikawa-Takata, K; Tabata, I; Miyashita, M
European Journal of Applied Physiology, 90(): 109-113.
10.1007/s00421-003-0860-0
CrossRef
Acta Paediatrica
Physical activity level and body mass index among schoolchildren in south-eastern Sweden
Raustorp, A; Pangrazi, RP; Stahle, A
Acta Paediatrica, 93(3): 400-404.
10.1080/08035250310007484
CrossRef
Journal of Nursing Scholarship
Physical activity in low-income postpartum women
Wilkinson, S; Huang, CM; Walker, LO; Sterling, BS; Kim, M
Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(2): 109-114.

Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Feasibility and Acceptability of Using Pedometers as an Intervention Tool for Latinas
Pekmezi, D; Dunsiger, S; Gaskins, R; Barbera, B; Marquez, B; Neighbors, C
Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 10(3): 451-457.

Journal of Physical Activity & Health
The Use of Pedometers for Monitoring Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents: Measurement Considerations
Clemes, SA; Biddle, SJH
Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 10(2): 249-262.

Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Comparison of GT3X Accelerometer and YAMAX Pedometer Steps/Day in a Free-Living Sample of Overweight and Obese Adults
Barreira, TV; Tudor-Locke, C; Champagne, CM; Broyles, ST; Johnson, WD; Katzmarzyk, PT
Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 10(2): 263-270.

Bmc Public Health
Randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention by primary care nurses to increase walking in patients aged 60-74 years: protocol of the PACE-Lift (Pedometer Accelerometer Consultation Evaluation - Lift) trial
Harris, T; Kerry, S; Victor, C; Ekelund, U; Woodcock, A; Iliffe, S; Whincup, P; Beighton, C; Ussher, M; David, L; Brewin, D; Adams, F; Rogers, A; Cook, D
Bmc Public Health, 13(): -.
ARTN 5
CrossRef
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Validity of Pedometers in People With Physical Disabilities: A Systematic Review
Kenyon, A; McEvoy, M; Sprod, J; Maher, C
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(6): 1161-1170.
10.1016/j.apmr.2012.11.030
CrossRef
Journal of School Health
The Effect of Physical Education Climates on Elementary Students' Physical Activity Behaviors
Wadsworth, DD; Robinson, LE; Rudisill, ME; Gell, N
Journal of School Health, 83(5): 306-313.
10.1111/josh.12032
CrossRef
Cancer Prevention Research
Effect of Exercise on Markers of Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Yale Exercise and Survivorship Study
Jones, SB; Thomas, GA; Hesselsweet, SD; Alvarez-Reeves, M; Yu, H; Irwin, ML
Cancer Prevention Research, 6(2): 109-118.
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-12-0278
CrossRef
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Step By Step: A Proof of Concept Study of C-Mill Gait Adaptability Training in the Chronic Phase After Stroke
Heeren, A; van Ooijen, MW; Geurts, ACH; Day, BL; Janssen, TWJ; Beek, PJ; Roerdink, M; Weerdesteyn, V
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 45(7): 616-622.
10.2340/16501977-1180
CrossRef
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Measurement of children's physical activity using a pedometer with a built-in memory
Trapp, GSA; Giles-Corti, B; Bulsara, M; Christian, HE; Timperio, AF; McCormack, GR; Villanueva, K
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16(3): 222-226.
10.1016/j.jsams.2012.06.011
CrossRef
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Behavioral Impacts of Sequentially versus Simultaneously Delivered Dietary Plus Physical Activity Interventions: the CALM Trial
King, AC; Castro, CM; Buman, MP; Hekler, EB; Urizar, GG; Ahn, DK
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 46(2): 157-168.
10.1007/s12160-013-9501-y
CrossRef
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The Influence of Monitoring Interval on Data Measurement: An Analysis of Step Counts of University Students
Sigmundova, D; Vasickova, J; Stelzer, J; Repka, E
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 10(2): 515-527.
10.3390/ijerph10020515
CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Comparison of accelerometers with oxygen consumption in older adults during exercise
FEHLING, PC; SMITH, DL; WARNER, SE; DALSKY, GP
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 31(1): 171-175.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Gait Speed and Step-Count Monitor Accuracy in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
STORTI, KL; PETTEE, KK; BRACH, JS; TALKOWSKI, JB; RICHARDSON, CR; KRISKA, AM
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(1): 59-64.
10.1249/mss.0b013e318158b504
PDF (141) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Pedometer Accuracy in Nursing Home and Community-Dwelling Older Adults
CYARTO, EV; MYERS, AM; TUDOR-LOCKE, C
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36(2): 205-209.

PDF (118)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Pedometer Measures of Free-Living Physical Activity: Comparison of 13 Models
SCHNEIDER, PL; CROUTER, SE; BASSETT, DR
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36(2): 331-335.

PDF (141)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
The Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time during Walking in Children
BEETS, MW; PATTON, MM; EDWARDS, S
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 37(3): 513-520.

PDF (218)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity and Reliability of Omron Pedometers for Prescribed and Self-Paced Walking
HOLBROOK, EA; BARREIRA, TV; KANG, M
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 41(3): 670-674.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181886095
PDF (104) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Comparison of Kenz Lifecorder EX and ActiGraph Accelerometers in 10-yr-old Children
MCCLAIN, JJ; SISSON, SB; WASHINGTON, TL; CRAIG, CL; TUDOR-LOCKE, C
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(4): 630-638.
10.1249/mss.0b013e3180313056
PDF (113) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Influence of Speed and Step Frequency during Walking and Running on Motion Sensor Output
ROWLANDS, AV; STONE, MR; ESTON, RG
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(4): 716-727.
10.1249/mss.0b013e318031126c
PDF (540) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity of the Omron HJ-112 Pedometer during Treadmill Walking
HASSON, RE; HALLER, J; POBER, DM; STAUDENMAYER, J; FREEDSON, PS
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 41(4): 805-809.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31818d9fc2
PDF (182) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Measurement of daily walking distance-questionnaire versus pedometer
BASSETT, DR
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(5): 1018-1023.

PDF (86)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Quantifying Physical Activity via Pedometry in Elementary Physical Education
SCRUGGS, PW; BEVERIDGE, SK; EISENMAN, PA; WATSON, DL; SHULTZ, BB; RANSDELL, LB
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 35(6): 1065-1071.

PDF (147)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Objective Assessment of Activity in Older Adults at Risk for Mobility Disability
MARSH, AP; VANCE, RM; FREDERICK, TL; HESSELMANN, SA; REJESKI, WJ
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(6): 1020-1026.
10.1249/mss.0b013e3180423ac3
PDF (266) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Overview of the Activity Counseling Trial (ACT) intervention for promoting physical activity in primary health care settings
KING, AC; SALLIS, JF; DUNN, AL; SIMONS-MORTON, DG; ALBRIGHT, CA; COHEN, S; REJESKI, WJ; MARCUS, BH; CODAY, MC; FOR THE ACTIVITY COUNSELING TRIAL RESEARCH GROUP,
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 30(7): 1086-1096.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Comparisons of four methods of estimating physical activity in adult women
LEENDERS, NY; SHERMAN, WM; NAGARAJA, HN
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(7): 1320-1326.

PDF (95)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity of the Actical Accelerometer Step-Count Function
ESLIGER, DW; PROBERT, A; GORBER, SC; BRYAN, S; LAVIOLETTE, M; TREMBLAY, MS
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(7): 1200-1204.
10.1249/mss.0b013e3804ec4e9
PDF (122) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Walking and Measurement
BASSETT, DR; MAHAR, MT; ROWE, DA; MORROW, JR
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(7): S529-S536.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31817c699c
PDF (290) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Revisiting "How Many Steps Are Enough?"
TUDOR-LOCKE, C; HATANO, Y; PANGRAZI, RP; KANG, M
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(7): S537-S543.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31817c7133
PDF (136) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Effects of a Controlled Pedometer-Intervention Trial for Low-Active Adolescent Girls
SCHOFIELD, L; MUMMERY, WK; SCHOFIELD, G
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 37(8): 1414-1420.

PDF (164)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Descriptive Epidemiology of Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity
TUDOR-LOCKE, C; HAM, SA; MACERA, CA; AINSWORTH, BE; KIRTLAND, KA; REIS, JP; KIMSEY, CD
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36(9): 1567-1573.

PDF (185)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Pedometer Indices for Weekly Physical Activity Recommendations in Postmenopausal Women
JORDAN, AN; JURCA, GM; TUDOR-LOCKE, C; CHURCH, TS; BLAIR, SN
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 37(9): 1627-1632.
10.1249/01.mss.0000177455.58960.aa
PDF (227) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Improving the Accuracy of Pedometer Used by the Elderly with the FFT Algorithm
ICHINOSEKI-SEKINE, N; KUWAE, Y; HIGASHI, Y; FUJIMOTO, T; SEKINE, M; TAMURA, T
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 38(9): 1674-1681.
10.1249/01.mss.0000227641.68360.c2
PDF (345) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity and Reliability of Omron Pedometers At Slow Walking Speeds
Jehn, ML; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Halle, M
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 41(9): 1826.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181ad81c1
PDF (47) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity of accelerometry for the assessment of moderate intensity physical activity in the field
HENDELMAN, D; MILLER, K; BAGGETT, C; DEBOLD, E; FREEDSON, P
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(9): S442-S449.

PDF (85)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity of four motion sensors in measuring moderate intensity physical activity
BASSETT, DR
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(9): S471-S480.

PDF (290)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
The utility of the Digi-Walker step counter to assess daily physical activity patterns
WELK, GJ; DIFFERDING, JA; THOMPSON, RW; BLAIR, SN; DZIURA, J; HART, P
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(9): S481-S488.

PDF (130)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
A Comparative Analysis of Pedometry in Measuring Physical Activity of Children
SCRUGGS, PW
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(10): 1837-1846.
10.1249/mss.0b013e318126c1aa
PDF (409) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Pedometer Accuracy during Walking over Different Surfaces
LEICHT, AS; CROWTHER, RG
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(10): 1847-1850.
10.1249/mss.0b013e3181405b9f
PDF (86) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Lapses and Psychosocial Factors Related to Physical Activity in Early Postmenopause
CONROY, MB; SIMKIN-SILVERMAN, LR; PETTEE, KK; HESS, R; KULLER, LH; KRISKA, AM
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39(10): 1858-1866.
10.1249/mss.0b013e318137388d
PDF (170) | CrossRef
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
An Environmental Intervention Aimed at Increasing Physical Activity Levels in Low-Income Women
Speck, BJ; Hines-Martin, V; Stetson, BA; Looney, SW
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 22(4): 263-271.
10.1097/01.JCN.0000278957.98124.8a
PDF (462) | CrossRef
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Cardiovascular Risks and Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Elderly African American Women
Crane, PB; Wallace, DC
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 22(4): 297-303.
10.1097/01.JCN.0000278960.82877.91
PDF (442) | CrossRef
Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention
Effects of a Pedometer‐Based Intervention on Physical Activity Levels After Cardiac Rehabilitation: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Butler, L; Furber, S; Phongsavan, P; Mark, A; Bauman, A
Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 29(2): 105-114.
10.1097/HCR.0b013e31819a01ff
PDF (353) | CrossRef
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
Assessing Pedometer Accuracy while Walking, Skipping, Galloping, Sliding, and Hopping
Smith, JD; Schroeder, CA
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 22(1): 276-282.
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31815f2f42
PDF (263) | CrossRef
Nursing Research
Correlates of Physical Activity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Belza, B; Steele, BG; Hunziker, J; Lakshminaryan, S; Holt, L; Buchner, DM
Nursing Research, 50(4): 195-202.

PDF (107)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Ambulatory Activity, Body Composition, and Lower-Limb Muscle Strength in Older Adults
SCOTT, D; BLIZZARD, L; FELL, J; JONES, G
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 41(2): 383-389.
10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181882c85
PDF (280) | CrossRef
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Comparison of Pedometer and Accelerometer Accuracy under Controlled Conditions
LE MASURIER, GC; TUDOR-LOCKE, C
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 35(5): 867-871.

PDF (111)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Evaluation of the SenseWear Pro Armband™ to Assess Energy Expenditure during Exercise
JAKICIC, JM; MARCUS, M; GALLAGHER, KI; RANDALL, C; THOMAS, E; GOSS, FL; ROBERTSON, RJ
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36(5): 897-904.

PDF (241)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Motion Sensor Accuracy under Controlled and Free-Living Conditions
LE MASURIER, GC; LEE, SM; TUDOR-LOCKE, C
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36(5): 905-910.

PDF (363)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Pedometer-Determined Walking and Body Composition Variables in African-American Women
HORNBUCKLE, LM; BASSETT, DR; THOMPSON, DL
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 37(6): 1069-1074.

PDF (273)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Validity of 10 Electronic Pedometers for Measuring Steps, Distance, and Energy Cost
CROUTER, SE; SCHNEIDER, PL; KARABULUT, M; BASSETT, DR
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 35(8): 1455-1460.

PDF (171)
Nursing Research
Effects of a Minimal Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Women: Daily Activity Records
Speck, BJ; Looney, SW
Nursing Research, 50(6): 374-378.

PDF (88)
Back to Top | Article Outline

©1996The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Images

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Connect With Us