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00005768-200905001-0283200005768_2009_41_410_killebrew_untrained_5miscellaneous< 15_0_1_0 >Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise©2009The American College of Sports MedicineVolume 41(5) Supplement 1May 2009p 410The Effect Of Vision On Muscle Power In Trained And Untrained Males And Females: 2632: Board #26 May 29 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM[F-22 Free Communication/Poster - Clinical Exercise Physiology: MAY 29, 2009 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM ROOM: Hall 4F]Killebrew, Shanna; Hensarling, Robert W.; Jung, Alan P.; Petrella, John K.Samford University, Birmingham, AL.(No relationships reported)Recent studies have documented significant isokinetic strength and power differences in the visually impaired compared to age-and-sex matched sighted individuals. However, these differences have been solely attributed to a decreased activity level in the visually impaired.PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if vision affects muscle power production. In addition, the ability of a regular lower body strength training regimen (2x's per wk) to accommodate for the absence of vision was also examined.METHODS: Thirty college-aged participants performed a seated leg press with and without vision (blindfold) in two separate counterbalanced trials. Quadriceps' power was calculated using the following variables: distance the leg press footplate was displaced, time of concentric muscle activity, and an individualized force variable for each participant (60% of 1 Repetition Maximum). Muscle activity was measured using surface electromyography. An alpha level of.05 was established and separate repeated measures analysis of variance were performed to determine the effect of visual stimuli, training status, and gender on muscle power production.RESULTS: A significant main effect was found for visual stimuli (p<.01). There was a significant interaction between vision x training status (p<.05), but not vision x gender (p=.147). A Tukey HSD revealed untrained females saw the greatest decrease in power (p<.001). Power significantly decreases in the absence of vision, but a regular strength training program in the visually impaired can be implemented to help counteract such occurrences.CONCLUSIONS: Strength and power differences in visually impaired individuals are rightfully attributed to activity level, but these findings suggest the role of vision in muscle power production should also be considered.The Effect Of Vision On Muscle Power In Trained And Untrained Males And Females: 2632: Board #26 May 29 2:00 PM - 3:30 PMKillebrew, Shanna; Hensarling, Robert W.; Jung, Alan P.; Petrella, John K.F-22 Free Communication/Poster - Clinical Exercise Physiology: MAY 29, 2009 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM ROOM: Hall 4F541