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00005768-200905001-0284000005768_2009_41_412_olson_predicting_5miscellaneous< 17_0_1_0 >Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise©2009The American College of Sports MedicineVolume 41(5) Supplement 1May 2009pp 412-413Factors Predicting Adherence To 9 Months Of Supervised Exercise In Healthy Older Women: 2640: Board #34 May 29 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM[F-23 Free Communication/Poster - Determinants of Physical Activity and Health Behaviors in Various Populations: MAY 29, 2009 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM ROOM: Hall 4F]Olson, Erin; Visek, Amanda; DiPietro, Loretta FACSMThe George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Washington, DC.(Sponsor: Loretta DiPietro, FACSM)Email: olsoneao@gwu.edu(No relationships reported)The determinants of physical activity participation in older people have been well-documented. Less is known, however, about factors affecting adherence to highly-structured and supervised exercise programs.PURPOSE: To determine factors related to adherence to a 9-month exercise trial among previously-inactive, healthy older (> 65 y) women (N=30).METHODS: Subjects were randomized into a: 1) higher- (ATH - 80% VO2peak); or 2) moderate- (ATM - 65% VO2peak) intensity aerobic; or 3) lower-intensity resistance (RTL; 50% VO2peak) group. All three groups were identical in exercise frequency (4 days/week); however, subjects in the AT groups exercised for a duration necessary to expend 300 kcal/session. All sessions were supervised at on-site facilities and subjects exercised in groups to enhance convenience and social support. Heart rate was measured continuously and recorded throughout exercise. Attendance was defined as the proportion of completed to prescribed exercise sessions (N=144). Adherence was defined as the proportion of prescribed sessions in which subjects achieved their: 1) prescribed heart rate; and 2) their prescribed duration. Determinants of adherence included age, BMI, lean mass (kg), %body fat, VO2peak, prescribed intensity (METs) and prescribed duration (min), and exercise self-efficacy score.RESULTS: Age, VO2peak, and body composition were similar among the three groups. Attendance was greatest in the ATH group (94%) and lowest in ATM (90%). Adherence to the prescribed duration was 95%, 91%, and 85% in the RTL, ATH, and ATM groups, respectively. Adherence to the prescribed intensity was 100% for all three groups. We observed a positive (rather than inverse) correlation between the prescribed METs and attendance (r=0.48; p<0.03), as well as adherence to the prescribed duration (r=0.53; p<0.01). Prescribed duration was not associated with attendance (r=0.14; p<0.46); however, the prescribed duration of each session was the strongest determinant of adherence to that duration (r=-0.72; p<0.0001).CONCLUSIONS: Exercise duration (not intensity) may negatively affect adherence to structured exercise programs. Programs comprising exercise of shorter duration, but greater frequency may be more effective in helping older adults achieve the health benefits of an active lifestyle.Factors Predicting Adherence To 9 Months Of Supervised Exercise In Healthy Older Women: 2640: Board #34 May 29 3:30 PM - 5:00 PMOlson, Erin; Visek, Amanda; DiPietro, Loretta FACSMF-23 Free Communication/Poster - Determinants of Physical Activity and Health Behaviors in Various Populations: MAY 29, 2009 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM ROOM: Hall 4F541