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00005768-200805001-0117100005768_2008_40_s110_otto_exercise_5miscellaneous< 16_0_1_0 >Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise©2008The American College of Sports MedicineVolume 40(5) Supplement 1May 2008p S110The Effect of Diet Versus Diet Plus Exercise on Class II and III Obesity: 994: May 30 3:30 PM - 3:45 PM[F-51 Free Communication/Slide - Weight Control and Obesity: May 30, 2008 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM ROOM: 103]Otto, Amy D.; Jakicic, John M. FACSM; Goodpaster, Bret H.; The Renew Study Research GroupUniversity of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.Email: ayotto@pitt.edu(No relationships reported)Obesity is associated with significant health problems that include increased risk of chronic diseases. Unfortunately, weight loss treatment for severely obese individuals (Class II and III obesity) often is centered on pharmacotherapy or surgery, and rarely focuses exclusively on changes in lifestyle through a behavioral weight loss intervention.PURPOSE: To examine the effect of diet only (D) versus diet plus exercise (DE) on weight loss in individuals classified with Class II (BMI: 35.0-39.9 kg/m2) or III (BMI: ≥40 kg/m2) obesity.METHODS: Fifty-three severely obese individuals (age = 46.0±6.2 years; weight = 116.2±18.2 kg) participated in a behavioral weight loss intervention. Subjects were randomized to either a D or DE intervention group. Both D and DE received a reduced calorie diet (1200-2000 kcal/wk) determined by their initial weight and provision of meal replacements to replace 2 meals and 2 snacks/day for 12 weeks with provision of meal replacements for 1 meal and 1 snack per day thereafter. For DE only, exercise was progressively increased from 50 to 225 min/wk by week 20. Body weight was measured at baseline and week 20.RESULTS: Overall weight loss was 10.0±6.1 kg (8.5±4.5%) from 0 to 20 weeks when D and DE were combined (p<0.05). A non-statistically significant weight loss difference of 2.4±1.7 kg was observed between D (8.7±4.7 kg) versus DE (11.1±6.9 kg). Similar results were observed when expressed as percent weight loss (D=7.7+4.0% vs. DE=9.2±5.0%)CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that severely obese individuals can lose a significant amount of weight in response to a behavioral weight loss intervention, with the addition of exercise contributing an additional 2.4 kg of weight loss compared to diet alone. While this weight loss difference is not statistically significant, this additional weight loss may be of clinical significance in the treatment of severely obese adults. Moreover, exercise may have additional independent effects on chronic disease risk factors. These results support the hypothesis that behavioral weight loss interventions that include diet and exercise can provide effective alternative approaches to pharmacotherapy or surgery in the treatment of severe obesity.The Effect of Diet Versus Diet Plus Exercise on Class II and III Obesity: 994: May 30 3:30 PM - 3:45 PMOtto, Amy D.; Jakicic, John M. FACSM; Goodpaster, Bret H.; The Renew Study Research GroupF-51 Free Communication/Slide - Weight Control and Obesity: May 30, 2008 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM ROOM: 103540