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00005768-200605001-0280600005768_2006_38_s460_wilk_adolescents_5abstract< 15_0_1_0 >Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise© 2006 American College of Sports MedicineVolume 38(5) SupplementMay 2006p S460Does Training in the Cold Enhance Body Weight and Fat Loss in Obese Adolescents?: 2472: Board#204 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM[Friday Morning Poster Presentations: Posters displayed from 7:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.: One-hour author presentation times are staggered from 8:30–9:30 a.m. and 9:30–10:30 a.m.: E-33 Free Communication/Poster – Weight Control: FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 2006 8:30 AM – 10:30 AM ROOM: Hall B]Wilk, Boguslaw FACSM; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kubacki, Marta; Trott, Raymond; Bar-Or, Oded FACSMMcMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.Email: wilkb@mcmaster.ca Despite published studies on the use of cold environment as a means for weight loss in adults, we are not aware of similar studies in obese adolescents. Training in the cold may be particularly effective for weight loss in children and adolescents, since cold-induced thermogenesis is more intense in children than in adults.PURPOSE: To determine whether training in a cold environment would enhance body weight and body fat loss in obese adolescents.METHODS: Twenty obese (>30% body fat), otherwise healthy, adolescent boys, ages 12 to 16 years participated in a 6-week (3 times per week) exercise training program. The boys were asked not to change their normal activity and eating patterns throughout the study. A nutritional assessment was done pre- and post-training to check compliance. Boys were randomly allocated to train in the cold C (5 °C, n=1 0) or a thermoneutral environment TN (24.5 °C, n=10). Each 70 min training unit (3 × 20 min exercise bouts with 5 min rests in between) was performed in a climatic chamber. The boys alternated between treadmill walking and cycling (both at 60 % predetermined VO2max) throughout the 6 weeks. Height (Ht), weight (Wt), body composition (by DEXA) and VO2max on a treadmill were measured before and after the 6-week training period. Two-way ANOVAs with between (C vs. TN environment) and within (pre- vs. post-training) factors were used (level of significance p < 0.05).RESULTS: Initial values (Mean±SE) for age 14.11 ± 0.36 yr vs. 14.08 ± 0.34 yr were similar but Ht 166.5 ± 2.6 cm vs. 168.2 ± 3.0 cm, Wt 89.27 ± 6.94 kg vs. 92.51 ± 7.51 kg and body fat (%Fat) 40.97±2.45 % vs. 43.03±1 .76 % were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in TN than in C, respectively. VO2max per kilogram was almost identical: 32.8±1.7 mL·kg−1min−1in C and 33.0±3.1 mL·kg−1. min−1 in TN. Over the 6-weeks training the boys gained weight (1.93 %BW, p=0.11 vs. 0.67 %BW, p=0.97), and reduced % body fat (−1.21 %, p=0.02 vs. −0.39 %, p=0.62) in C and in TN, respectively. However the differences between C and TN were insignificant (p > 0.05) for both weight gain and %fat loss.CONCLUSION: The 6-week exercise training in the cold induces significant %fat loss in obese boys, without losses in total body weight. Although the %fat loss was threefold greater in C (1.2%) than in TN (0.4%) this difference was statistically insignificant.Does Training in the Cold Enhance Body Weight and Fat Loss in Obese Adolescents?: 2472: Board#204 9:30 AM – 10:30 AMWilk, Boguslaw FACSM; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kubacki, Marta; Trott, Raymond; Bar-Or, Oded FACSMFriday Morning Poster Presentations: Posters displayed from 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: One-hour author presentation times are staggered from 8:30-9:30 a.m. and 9:30-10:30 a.m.: E-33 Free Communication/Poster - Weight Control: FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 2006 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM ROOM: Hall B538