Skip Navigation LinksHome > January 2014 - Volume 46 - Issue 1 > Effects of a Low-Volume Aerobic-Type Interval Exercise on V˙...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182a38da8
Basic Sciences

Effects of a Low-Volume Aerobic-Type Interval Exercise on V˙O2max and Cardiac Mass

MATSUO, TOMOAKI1,2; SAOTOME, KOUSAKU3; SEINO, SATOSHI4; SHIMOJO, NOBUTAKE4; MATSUSHITA, AKIRA3; IEMITSU, MOTOYUKI5; OHSHIMA, HIROSHI1; TANAKA, KIYOJI4; MUKAI, CHIAKI1

Collapse Box

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of time-efficient, low-volume interval exercises on cardiorespiratory capacity and left ventricular (LV) mass with traditional continuous exercise in sedentary adults.

Methods: Forty-two healthy but sedentary male subjects (age 26.5 ± 6.2 yr) participated in an 8-wk, five times per week, supervised exercise intervention. They were randomly assigned to one of three exercise protocols: sprint interval training (SIT, 5 min, 100 kcal), high-intensity interval aerobic training (HIAT, 13 min, 180 kcal), and continuous aerobic training (CAT, 40 min, 360 kcal). Cardiorespiratory capacity (V˙O2max) and LV mass (3T-MRI) were measured preintervention and postintervention.

Results: We observed significant (P < 0.01) increases in V˙O2max in all three groups, and the effect of the HIAT was the greatest of the three (SIT, 16.7% ± 11.6%; HIAT, 22.5% ± 12.2%; CAT, 10.0% ± 8.9%; P = 0.01). There were significant changes in LV mass, stroke volume (SV), and resting HR in both the SIT (LV mass, 6.5% ± 8.3%; SV, 5.3% ± 8.3%; HR, −7.3% ± 11.1%; all P < 0.05) and HIAT (LV mass, 8.0% ± 8.3%; SV, 12.1% ± 9.8%; HR, −12.7% ± 12.2%; all P < 0.01) but not in the CAT (LV mass, 2.5% ± 10.1%; SV, 3.6% ± 6.6%; HR, −2.2% ± 13.3%; all P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Our study revealed that V˙O2max improvement with the HIAT was greater than with the CAT despite the HIAT being performed with a far lower volume and in far less time than the CAT. This suggests that the HIAT has potential as a time-efficient training mode to improve V˙O2max in sedentary adults.

© 2014 American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Connect With Us