Low-Volume, High-Intensity Interval Training in Patients with CAD

CURRIE, KATHARINE D.1; DUBBERLEY, JONATHAN B.2; McKELVIE, ROBERT S.1,2,3; MacDONALD, MAUREEN J.1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31828bbbd4
Clinical Sciences
Abstract

Purpose: Isocaloric interval exercise training programs have been shown to elicit improvements in numerous physiological indices in patients with CAD. Low-volume high-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is effective in healthy populations; however, its effectiveness in cardiac rehabilitation has not been established. This study compared the effects of 12-wk of HIT and higher-volume moderate-intensity endurance exercise (END) on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak) in patients with CAD.

Methods: Twenty-two patients with documented CAD were randomized into HIT (n = 11) or END (n = 11) based on pretraining FMD. Both groups attended two supervised sessions per week for 12 wk. END performed 30–50 min of continuous cycling at 58% peak power output (PPO), whereas HIT performed ten 1-min intervals at 89% PPO separated by 1-min intervals at 10% PPO per session.

Results: Relative FMD was increased posttraining (END, 4.4% ± 2.6% vs 5.9% ± 3.6%; HIT, 4.6% ± 3.6% vs 6.1% ± 3.4%, P ≤ 0.001 pre- vs posttraining) with no differences between groups. A training effect was also observed for relative V˙O2peak (END, 18.7 ± 5.7 vs 22.3 ± 6.1 mL·kg−1·min−1; HIT, 19.8 ± 3.7 vs 24.5 ± 4.5 mL·kg−1·min−1, P < 0.001 for pre- vs posttraining), with no group differences.

Conclusions: Low-volume HIT provides an alternative to the current, more time-intensive prescription for cardiac rehabilitation. HIT elicited similar improvements in fitness and FMD as END, despite differences in exercise duration and intensity.

Author Information

1Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CANADA; 2Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CANADA; and 3Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CANADA

Address for correspondence: Maureen MacDonald, Ph.D., Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4K1; E-mail: macdonmj@mcmaster.ca.

Submitted for publication August 2012.

Accepted for publication February 2013.

© 2013 American College of Sports Medicine