Exercise-Induced Insulin-Like Growth Factor I System Concentrations after Training in Women

GREGORY, SARA M.; SPIERING, BARRY A.; ALEMANY, JOSEPH A.; TUCKOW, ALEXANDER P.; RARICK, KEVIN R.; STAAB, JEFFERY S.; HATFIELD, DISA L.; KRAEMER, WILLIAM J.; MARESH, CARL M.; NINDL, BRADLEY C.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182750bd4
Basic Sciences
Abstract

Introduction: This study examined the effects of short-term physical training on the acute hormonal response (i.e., growth hormone, total and free insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I], and IGF binding proteins [IGFBP]-1, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3) to resistance exercise (RE) in women.

Methods: Forty-six women (20.3 ± 0.3 yr, mass = 64.1 ± 7.3 kg, height = 165.7 ± 1.0 cm) were randomly assigned to an endurance training (E), resistance training (R), combined training (R + E), or control (C) group for 8

wk. Subjects completed a standardized bout of RE (six sets of back squats at 10 repetition maximum) before and after training. Blood samples were obtained at rest (PRE), after the third set, immediately postexercise (POST), and at 15 min and 30 min after exercise.

Results: Acute RE significantly increased (P < 0.05) serum growth hormone (mean ± SD; change from PRE to POST = +10.9 ± 7.5 μg·L−1), total IGF-I (+66.1 ± 25.4 μg·L−1), IGFBP-1 (+2.5 ± 3.1 μg·L−1), IGFBP-2 (+86.0 ± 86.8 μg·L−1), and IGFBP-3 (+0.69 ± 0.25 mg·L−1) concentrations and decreased free IGF-I concentrations (−0.14 ± 0.21 μg·L−1). After 8 wk of training, total IGF-I concentrations were significantly increased (change in POST concentrations from week 0 to week 8 = +82.5 ± 120.8 μg·L−1), and IGFBP-1 concentrations were significantly decreased (−6.7 ± 13.6 μg·L−1) during exercise in groups that participated in resistance training (R and R + E); no significant changes were seen after E or C.

Conclusions: Participation in resistance training increased total IGF-I and reduced IGFBP-1 concentrations during acute RE, indicating exercise mode-specific adaptations in the circulating IGF-I system.

Author Information

1Military Performance Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA; 2Deparment of Exercise and Sports Studies, Springfield College, Springfield, MA; 3Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; 4Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; and 5Department of Kinesiology, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI

Address for correspondence: Bradley C. Nindl, Ph.D., F.A.C.S.M., Military Performance Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA; E-mail: Bradley.nindl@us.army.mil.

Submitted for publication May 2012.

Accepted for publication September 2012.

© 2013 American College of Sports Medicine