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Effects of Priming Exercise on V˙O2 Kinetics and the Power-Duration Relationship

BURNLEY, MARK; DAVISON, GLEN; BAKER, JONATHAN ROBERT

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: November 2011 - Volume 43 - Issue 11 - p 2171-2179
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31821ff26d
Applied Sciences

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the influence of prior heavy- and severe-intensity exercise on the oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and the power-duration relationship.

Methods: Ten cyclists performed 13 exercise tests during a 4-wk period, consisting of a ramp test to determine the gas exchange threshold (GET) and the peak V˙O2, followed by a series of square-wave tests to exhaustion under three conditions: no prior exercise (control), prior heavy exercise (6 min at a work rate above GET but below critical power [CP)], and prior severe exercise (6 min at a work rate above the CP). Pulmonary gas exchange was measured throughout the exhaustive exercise bouts and the parameters of the power-duration relationship (CP and the curvature constant, W′) were determined from the linear work-time model.

Results: Prior heavy exercise increased the amplitude of the primary V˙O2 response (by ∼0.19 ± 0.28 L·min−1, P = 0.001), reduced the V˙O2 slow component trajectory (by 0.04 ± 0.09 L·min−2, P = 0.002), and increased the time to exhaustion (by ∼52 ± 92 s, P = 0.005). The CP was unchanged (control vs prior heavy: 284 ± 47 vs 283 ± 44 W; 95% confidence interval, −7 to 5 W), whereas the W′ was increased by heavy-intensity priming (16.0 ± 4.8 vs 18.7 ± 4.8 kJ; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-5.2 kJ). Severe-intensity exercise had a similar effect on the V˙O2 kinetics but had no effect on the time to exhaustion, the CP (275 ± 45 W), or the W′ (16.7 ± 4.7 kJ).

Conclusions: Prior heavy-intensity exercise primes the V˙O2 kinetics and increases the amount of work that can be performed above the CP.

Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion, UNITED KINGDOM

Address for correspondence: Mark Burnley, Ph.D., Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Carwyn James Building, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, SY23 3FD, United Kingdom; E-mail: mhb@aber.ac.uk.

Submitted for publication September 2010.

Accepted for publication April 2011.

©2011The American College of Sports Medicine