Physical Activity as a Long-Term Predictor of Peak Oxygen Uptake: The HUNT Study

ASPENES, STIAN THORESEN1,2; NAUMAN, JAVAID1,2; NILSEN, TOM IVAR LUND3; VATTEN, LARS JOHAN1,4; WISLØFF, ULRIK1,2

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318216ea50
Epidemiology
Abstract

Introduction: A physically active lifestyle and a relatively high level of cardiorespiratory fitness are important for longevity and long-term health. No population-based study has prospectively assessed the association of physical activity levels with long-term peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak).

Methods: 1843 individuals (906 women and 937 men) who were between 18 and 66 yr at baseline and were free from known lung or heart diseases at both baseline (1984-1986) and follow-up (2006-2008) were included in the study. Self-reported physical activity was recorded at both occasions, and V˙O2peak was measured at follow-up. The association of physical activity levels and V˙O2peak was adjusted for age, level of education, smoking status, and weight change from baseline to follow-up, using ANCOVA statistics.

Results: The level of physical activity at baseline was strongly associated with V˙O2peak at follow-up 23 yr later in both men and women (Ptrends < 0.001). Compared with individuals who were inactive at baseline, women and men who were highly active at baseline had higher (3.3 and 4.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) V˙O2peak at follow-up. Women who were inactive at baseline but highly active at follow-up had 3.7 mL·kg−1·min−1 higher V˙O2peak compared with women who were inactive both at baseline and at follow-up. The corresponding comparison in men showed a difference of 5.2 mL·kg−1·min−1 (95% confidence interval = 3.1-7.3) in V˙O2peak.

Conclusions: Physical activity level at baseline was positively associated with directly measured cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak) 23 yr later. People who changed from low to high activity during the observation period had substantially higher V˙O2peak at follow-up compared with people whose activity remained low.

Author Information

1K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NORWAY; 2Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NORWAY; 3Human Movement Science Program, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NORWAY; and 4Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NORWAY

Address for correspondence: Ulrik Wisløff, Ph.D., Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postboks 8905, Medisinsk teknisk forskningssenter, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; E-mail: ulrik.wisloff@ntnu.no.

Submitted for publication December 2010.

Accepted for publication February 2011.

©2011The American College of Sports Medicine