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Heart Rate Variability, QT Variability, and Electrodermal Activity during Exercise

BOETTGER, SILKE1; PUTA, CHRISTIAN2; YERAGANI, VIKRAM K.3,4; DONATH, LARS2; MÜLLER, HANS-JOSEF2; GABRIEL, HOLGER H. W.2; BÄR, KARL-JÜRGEN1,5

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: March 2010 - Volume 42 - Issue 3 - p 443-448
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181b64db1
Basic Sciences

Purpose: Various measures of autonomic function have been developed, and their applicability and significance during exercise are controversial.

Methods: Physiological data were therefore obtained from 23 sport students before, during, and after exercise. Measures of R-R interval variability, QT variability index (QTvi), and electrodermal activity (EDA) were calculated. We applied an incremental protocol applying 70%, 85%, 100%, and 110% of the individual anaerobic threshold for standardized comparison.

Results: Although HR increased stepwise, parasympathetic parameters such as the root mean square of successive differences were not different during exercise and do not mirror autonomic function satisfactorily. Similar results were observed with the approximate entropy of R-R intervals (ApEnRR). In contrast, the increase in sympathetic activity was well reflected in the EDA, QTvi, and ApEn of the QT interval (ApEnQT)/ApEnRR ratio.

Conclusion: We suggest that linear and nonlinear parameters of R-R variability do not adequately reflect vagal modulation. Sympathetic function can be assessed by EDA, QTvi, or ApEnQT/ApEnRR ratio.

1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, Jena, GERMANY; 2Department of Sports Medicine, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena, GERMANY; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI; 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CANADA; and 5Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Ruhr-University, Bochum, GERMANY

Address for correspondence: Karl-Jürgen Bär, M.D., Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, Jena, Philosophenweg 3, 07743 Jena, Germany; E-mail: Karl-Juergen.Baer@med.uni-jena.de.

Submitted for publication April 2009.

Accepted for publication July 2009.

©2010The American College of Sports Medicine