Effects of Quercetin and EGCG on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Immunity

NIEMAN, DAVID C.1; HENSON, DRU A.2; MAXWELL, KENDRA R.2; WILLIAMS, ASHLEY S.2; MCANULTY, STEVEN R.1; JIN, FUXIA1; SHANELY, R. ANDREW1; LINES, THOMAS C.1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318199491f
Basic Sciences
Abstract

Purpose: To test the influence of 1000 mg of quercetin (Q) with or without 120 mg of epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), 400 mg of isoquercetin, and 400 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (Q-EGCG) on exercise performance, muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, and changes in measures of immunity and inflammation before and after a 3-d period of heavy exertion.

Methods: Trained cyclists (N = 39) were randomized to placebo (P), Q, or Q-EGCG and ingested supplements in a double-blinded fashion for 2 wk before, during, and 1 wk after a 3-d period in which subjects cycled for 3 h·d−1 at ∼57% Wmax. Blood, saliva, and muscle biopsy samples were collected before and after 2 wk of supplementation and immediately after the exercise bout on the third day. Blood and saliva samples were also collected 14 h after exercise.

Results: Two-week supplementation resulted in a significant increase in plasma quercetin for Q and Q-EGCG and granulocyte oxidative burst activity (GOBA) in Q-EGCG. Immediately after the third exercise bout, significant decreases for C-reactive protein (CRP), and plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were measured in Q-EGCG compared with P. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and CRP were reduced in Q-EGCG 14 h after exercise. No group differences were measured in muscle messenger RNA expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator α, citrate synthase, or cytochrome c.

Conclusions: Two-week supplementation with Q-EGCG was effective in augmenting GOBA andin countering inflammation after 3 d of heavy exertion in trained cyclists.

Author Information

1Departments of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science and 2Biology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC

Address for correspondence: David C. Nieman, Ph.D., F.A.C.S.M., Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, PO Box 32071, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608; E-mail: niemandc@appstate.edu.

Submitted for publication October 2008.

Accepted for publication December 2008.

©2009The American College of Sports Medicine