Resistance Training and Diastolic Myocardial Tissue Velocities in Obese Children

NAYLOR, LOUISE HALEH1,2; WATTS, KATIE3; SHARPE, JOAN ANDREE4; JONES, TIMOTHY WILLIAM3,5; DAVIS, ELIZABETH ANN3,5; THOMPSON, ALISHA3,5; GEORGE, KEITH6; RAMSAY, JAMES MICHAEL4; O'DRISCOLL, GERRY2,7; GREEN, DANIEL JOHN1,6

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318182a9e0
CLINICAL SCIENCES: Clinically Relevant
Abstract

Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resistance exercise training on early diastolic myocardial velocities (E′) in an obese pediatric population.

Methods: Twenty-three obese adolescents were selected to participate in either a resistance-based training program (RT; n = 13, 12.2 ± 0.4 yr, body mass index [BMI] = 32.5 ± 1.9 kg·m−2) or a nonexercise control intervention (n = 10, 13.6 ± 0.7 yr, BMI = 30.2 ± 2.6 kg·m−2) for 8 wk. All subjects had repeated echocardiographic assessments to determine left ventricular (LV) geometry, early transmitral flow velocity (E), and E′.

Results: LV mass and wall thicknesses did not significantly change with training or in controls. RT improved E′ (11.9 ± 0.5 to 13.3 ± 0.5 cm·s−1, P< 0.01) in the presence of a decrease in E/E′ (8.17 ± 0.39 to 7.06 ± 0.30 cm·s−1, P < 0.01), a marker of left atrial pressure. No changes were evident in the inactive control subjects.

Conclusions: A supervised 8-wk RT exercise program improved early diastolic tissue velocity in obese children, independent of changes in LV morphology.

Author Information

1School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley; 2Cardiac Transplant Unit, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth; 3Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Crawley; Departments of 4Cardiology, 5Endocrinology and Diabetes, Princess Margaret Hospital, Subiaco, AUSTRALIA; 6Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, UNITED KINDOM; and 7School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, AUSTRALIA

Address for correspondence: Louise H. Naylor, Ph.D., School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, The University of Western Australia, M408 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6907, Australia; E-mail: louisenaylor@westnet.com.au.

Submitted for publication April 2008.

Accepted for publication June 2008.

©2008The American College of Sports Medicine