Knee Strength and Knee Adduction Moments following Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy

STURNIEKS, DAINA L.1; BESIER, THOR F.2; HAMER, PETER W.3; ACKLAND, TIMOTHY R.1; MILLS, PETER M.1; STACHOWIAK, GWIDON W.4; PODSIADLO, PAWEL4; LLOYD, DAVID G.1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318167812a
CLINICAL SCIENCES: Clinically Relevant
Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between muscular strength about the knee and knee joint moments during gait in patients who had undergone arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM).

Methods: One hundred and two APM patients and 42 age-matched nonoperated controls underwent strength testing and three-dimensional gait analysis. Patients were divided into weak and normal subgroups and compared with controls for spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic gait parameters.

Results: Spatiotemporal parameters, kinematics, and sagittal plane kinetics were similar between APM patients and controls. The APM group displayed weaker concentric knee extension and flexion strength compared with controls. The weak APM subgroup had an increased average and peak knee adduction moments over stance compared with the APM subgroup with normal strength levels and controls. The normal strength APM subgroup had a larger peak knee adduction moment in early stance compared with controls.

Conclusion: Achieving normal lower limb muscle strength following APM appears important to resume normal frontal plane loading of the knee while walking.

Author Information

1School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, AUSTRALIA; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; 3School of Physiotherapy, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, AUSTRALIA; and 4School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, AUSTRALIA

Address for correspondence: David G. Lloyd, Ph.D., School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, M408 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia; E-mail: dlloyd@cyllene.uwa.edu.au.

Submitted for publication August 2007.

Accepted for publication December 2007.

©2008The American College of Sports Medicine