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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/mss.0b013e318157936d
BASIC SCIENCES: Original Investigations

A Single Session of Resistance Exercise Induces Oxidative Damage in Untrained Men

RIETJENS, SASKIA J.1; BEELEN, MILOU2; KOOPMAN, RENE2; VAN LOON, LUC J. C.2,3; BAST, AALT1; HAENEN, GUIDO R. M. M.1

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Abstract

Purpose: During exercise, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species significantly increases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single session of resistance exercise on antioxidant capacity, oxidative damage, and inflammation.

Methods: Muscle biopsies, urine, and blood samples were collected from seven healthy men before and after a single bout of resistance exercise.

Results: A single session of resistance exercise was found to induce oxidative damage, as shown by a 40% increase in the concentration of urinary F-isoprostanes (P < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity of plasma increased 16% (P < 0.05). This increase seemed to be predominantly attributable to an increase in plasma uric acid concentrations of 53% (P < 0.05). Similar to uric acid, but to a relatively much smaller extent, vitamin C and vitamin E levels in plasma were also elevated (P < 0.05). Moreover, the erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) concentration increased 47% during exercise (P < 0.05). Also in skeletal muscle, uric acid levels were found to increase after exercise (P < 0.05). Moreover, 30 min after exercise, skeletal muscle glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase activity increased 28 and 42%, respectively (P < 0.05). Skeletal muscle GSH and glutathione disulphide (GSSG) concentrations were not affected by exercise. The Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was not increased by exercise, indicating that a NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response does not occur.

Conclusion: We conclude that a single session of resistance exercise induces oxidative damage despite an adaptive increase in antioxidant capacity of blood and skeletal muscle.

©2007The American College of Sports Medicine

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