Energy Cost of Physical Activities in Children: Validation of SenseWear Armband

ARVIDSSON, DANIEL1; SLINDE, FRODE1,2; LARSSON, SVEN3; HULTHÉN, LENA1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: November 2007 - Volume 39 - Issue 11 - pp 2076-2084
doi: 10.1249/mss.0b013e31814fb439
SPECIAL COMMUNICATIONS: Methodological Advances

Purpose: To examine the validity of SenseWear Pro2 Armband in assessing energy cost of physical activities in children, and to contribute with values of energy costs in an overview of physical activities in children.

Methods: Energy cost was assessed by SenseWear Pro2 Armband in 20 healthy children, 11-13 yr, while lying down resting, sitting playing games on mobile phone, stepping up and down on a step board, bicycling on a stationary bike, jumping on a trampoline, playing basketball, and walking/running on a treadmill at the speeds 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 km·h−1. During these activities, energy cost was also assessed from V˙O2 and V˙CO2 measured by Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system, which was used as criterion method.

Results: The difference in energy cost between SenseWear Pro2 Armband and Oxycon Mobile was −0.7 (0.5) (P < 0.001) for resting, −2.0 (0.9) (P < 0.001) for playing games on mobile phone, −6.6 (2.3) (P < 0.001) for stepping on the step board, −12.0 (3.7) (P < 0.001) for bicycling, −2.7 (11.9) (P = 0.34) for jumping on the trampoline, and −14.8 (6.4) kJ·min−1 (P < 0.001) for playing basketball. The difference in energy cost between SenseWear Pro2 Armband and Oxycon Mobile for increasing treadmill speed was 1.3 (3.1) (P = 0.048), 0.1 (2.9) (P = 0.82), −1.2 (2.6) (P = 0.049), −1.6 (3.2) (P = 0.044), −3.1 (3.7) (P = 0.0013), −4.9 (3.7) (P < 0.001), −5.3 (3.7) (P < 0.001), and −11.1 (3.5) kJ·min−1 (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: SenseWear Pro2 Armband underestimated energy cost of most activities in this study, an underestimation that increased with increased physical activity intensity. A table of energy costs (MET values) of physical activities in children measured by indirect calorimetry is presented as an initiation of the creation of a compendium of physical activities in children.

1Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, SWEDEN; 2School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, SWEDEN; and 3Department of Internal Medicine/Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, SWEDEN

Address for correspondence: Daniel Arvidsson, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden; E-mail: daniel.arvidsson@nutrition.gu.se.

Submitted for publication March 2007.

Accepted for publication July 2007.

©2007The American College of Sports Medicine