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Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection following Exercise in Resistance-Trained Men

HEFFERNAN, KEVIN S.; JAE, SAE YOUNG; ECHOLS, GEORGE H.; LEPINE, NICOLAS R.; FERNHALL, BO

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2007 - Volume 39 - Issue 5 - pp 842-848
doi: 10.1249/mss.0b013e318031b03c
BASIC SCIENCES: Original Investigations

Purpose: Resistance training increases arterial stiffness and pressure wave reflection. We tested the hypothesis that potentially greater tonic arterial stiffness in resistance-trained (RT) men may alter the vascular response to an acute exercise stressor.

Methods: Thirty participants (age 22 ± 0.5 yr; 15 highly RT men and 15 sedentary non-RT men) underwent measures of central (carotid femoral) and peripheral (femoral dorsalis pedis) pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx; index of central pressure wave reflection derived from radial artery applanation tonometry and pulse wave analysis) before and 10, 20, and 30 min after maximal aerobic exercise.

Results: RT men were significantly stronger (bench press 143 ± 7 vs 85 ± 2 kg, P < 0.05) and heavier (93 ± 3 vs 82 ± 3 kg, P < 0.05) than sedentary men. Groups did not differ in resting central/peripheral PWV or in AIx. AIx was not changed at 10 min after maximal aerobic exercise in both groups and was reduced similarly in both groups at 20 and 30 min after maximal aerobic exercise (P < 0.05). Peripheral PWV decreased similarly at all time points after maximal aerobic exercise in both groups and was not recovered by 30 min (P < 0.05). There was no change in central PWV after maximal aerobic exercise.

Conclusions: The arterial response to maximal aerobic exercise was similar in highly RT and non-RT men. There was no change in intensity of central pressure wave reflection 10min after exercise, despite significant reductions in peripheral muscular artery stiffness. Arterial reactivity to an acute exercisestressor is not impaired in young, highly RT men.

The Exercise and Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL

Address for correspondence: Kevin S. Heffernan, M.S., Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, Exercise and Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Rehabilitation Education Center, 1207 S. Oak St. Champaign, IL 61820; E-mail: kheffer2@uiuc.edu.

Submitted for publication April 2006.

Accepted for publication December 2006.

©2007The American College of Sports Medicine